Paramedic to Regular CMT

#1
Hi

I was wondering if there is anyone out there who has qualified as a uk Para, IHCD or Uni route and then joined the regulars as a CMT?
 
#2
Why would you want to do that ? Going from highly skilled, experienced and trained, multi skilled Prehospital practitioner to. Box painter ?

That said a lad I work with is in the Crab auxilliarys and has deployed in role with MIRT (MERT ?) Twice now.
 
#3
Glad to say days of box painting and getting head down on the scrim nets are over. Yes there is equipment maint but we all do that to some extent. Today it's a pretty full on cycle of training, ops and med covers.

Let's hope one day this will be recognised and some sort of equivalence can be gained.
 
#4
Glad to say days of box painting and getting head down on the scrim nets are over. Yes there is equipment maint but we all do that to some extent. Today it's a pretty full on cycle of training, ops and med covers.

Let's hope one day this will be recognised and some sort of equivalence can be gained.
They were on about that when I transferred to the medics in 87, and were still on about it when I left in 97
 
#5
They were on about it in the 60's when I joined up, so hurry up and wait.
 
#6
You'd have to be absolutely fuckin insane to join up as a CMT if you're already a Paramedic......

Untill the military formally recognise Paramedics as a stand alone profession, don't even think of signing on. Even at 4626, where Paramedics are actively encouraged to sign on, you'd still only be an RAF Medic that just happens to be a paramedic. Unlike Nurses and Docs (amoungst others), who have their own career strand and are commisionable...

On a separate note, those that hold their CMT1 (or regimental equivalent), should as the next step in their career, be able to attend the OSMC and move to enhanced CMT. That would give some an equivalence with civvies.
 
#7
The military knows that as soon as the recognition is given, the CMT cadre will sign off in droves! And why the flipping Eco wouldn't they?
 
#8
I take your point, and you are of course correct.
Other organisations have a similar problem with employees selected for some of the more gucci and potentially lucrative trg. They get around this issue via contractual obligation. In other words, if you want training at that level, then you need to commit to that employer. You're selected via application, skills assessments, scrutiny of a career and personal portfolio and a board interview. If you're successful, and having undertaken said training then decide to sign off/resign, the financial penalties are massive. Usually, you have to repay all of your training costs plus any admin and logistic cost to the company, and you'll usually be required to financially support your replacement whilst they're training.
That way, companies get the right people, with the right skills and experience in the right place at the right time. There's absolutely no reason why this wouldn't work within the armed services. Indeed, I'd be very surprised if it didn't already exist for some trades and professions.

Actually, if memory serves, I seem to remember a similar system for nurses, in that, a nurse can join as a student and train through the military, then to become a staff nurse S/NCO upon qualification - I'm sure they're contractually tied in. However, join as a qualified nurse, and you're commisionable. Might be wrong, but I'm pretty sure that was the score.
 
#9
What really gets me is that as a CMT (the artist formally known as MA) we were expected to deploy on med cover and provide all levels of primary health care as well as the emergency life support stuff, we were trained reasonably well, but most of it we picked up ourselves via osmosis from colleagues, books etc, but we were the bottom of the food gain when it came to pay. My niece recently ( well about two years ago) joined as a CMT kept failing the CMT class 3 qual, transferred to the QAs as a HCA and is pretty much instantly on a higher pay scale, how does that work?
 
#10
I have memories of the great redundancy rounds in the mid 90s and they first asked for approx 100 CMTs from Pte to WO1 and ended up getting around 500 applications (from a cadre of around 1,000 CMTs)! The package was too good not to go for it. Lol
 
#13
Well they ended up taking about 6 of the fat boys and two of the wheezy guys with a sick toe from Matron! Lol
 
#14
Why would you want to do that ? Going from highly skilled, experienced and trained, multi skilled Prehospital practitioner to. Box painter ?

That said a lad I work with is in the Crab auxilliarys and has deployed in role with MIRT (MERT ?) Twice now.
This is correct!

The RAF Reserve is the only service that recognises Paramedics and then has an actual role for them on Ops. As was born out on a recent thread, sadly, the Army doesn't see any need for the extra skills (outside of SF) .....

The whole rank, progression and parity with the QA thing is another of those little anomolies that only the Army could get away with .....

OP - 'don't bother' would be my suggestion - if you can get on tour with the Reserve (big 'if' nowadays - don't get conned into thinking your quals are worth a shit on selection), then fine, you'll get some good trauma exposure, but don't throw an NHS career away to down-skill as a CMT. (Sorry if that sounds harsh on CMTs - but in civvy terms, where diploma/degree education is now the only route into being a Paramedic , that's the reality)
 
#15
... but don't throw an NHS career away to down-skill as a CMT. (Sorry if that sounds harsh on CMTs
It's not harsh on CMT as a trade. A great deal of CMT's would be able to take the course on, but the actual job requirements are down skilling in a big way
 
#16
This is correct!

The RAF Reserve is the only service that recognises Paramedics and then has an actual role for them on Ops. As was born out on a recent thread, sadly, the Army doesn't see any need for the extra skills (outside of SF) .....

The whole rank, progression and parity with the QA thing is another of those little anomolies that only the Army could get away with .....

OP - 'don't bother' would be my suggestion - if you can get on tour with the Reserve (big 'if' nowadays - don't get conned into thinking your quals are worth a shit on selection), then fine, you'll get some good trauma exposure, but don't throw an NHS career away to down-skill as a CMT. (Sorry if that sounds harsh on CMTs - but in civvy terms, where diploma/degree education is now the only route into being a Paramedic , that's the reality)
Actually, it's a bit of a play on words, but 4626 do not recognise Paramedics as a service profession, which is a complete corporate hypocracy, because they actively recruit Paramedics. The Paramedics that they take on are RAF Medics. That's their formal trade, not Paramedic.

I say again, until the military recognise Paramedics in the same way that our colleagues in Nursing and Doctoral professions are recognised, then tell them to fook off, and don't sign on.

If you do, be mindful of the fact that you'll have someone who couldn't acheive state registration as long as they've got a hole in their arrse in charge of you. You'll be a CMT and nothing more, which will inevitably have a detrimental effect on your ability to stay on the HCPC register...........
 
#17
Actually, it's a bit of a play on words, but 4626 do not recognise Paramedics as a service profession, which is a complete corporate hypocracy, because they actively recruit Paramedics. The Paramedics that they take on are RAF Medics. That's their formal trade, not Paramedic.

I say again, until the military recognise Paramedics in the same way that our colleagues in Nursing and Doctoral professions are recognised, then tell them to fook off, and don't sign on.
Actively recruiting Paras and then putting them solely on pre-hospital roles with MERT, where their skills are used, is at least a sight better than using them as scribes and runners in Bastion......

Can't disagree with the last bit though
 
#18
Yep, I agree entirely. It's just the hypocracy, and dare I say, bloody mind knobs who quite clearly don't know what the profession offers, that lump Paramedics in with CMT/MA/RAF Medic etc.

Yet, in the next breath, the guys on MERT are issued MERT PARAMEDIC badges to wear on their war fighting kit. Then when the same are back in UK, and walking around in their Capt Scarlet rig (what the fook is that all about), they get the 'You're just an RAF Medic'.

I really can't see why any Paramedic would even consider signing on.
 
#19
If you do, be mindful of the fact that you'll have someone who couldn't acheive state registration as long as they've got a hole in their arrse in charge of you. You'll be a CMT and nothing more, which will inevitably have a detrimental effect on your ability to stay on the HCPC register...........
Couldn't of put it better myself. I couldn't imagine a Paramedic joining up, and getting sent to a Med Regt / Fd Hosp as a Pte. I think he/she would have got completely threaders and generally fed up by week 2 of Phase 2 training!
 
#20
Having joined the TA long before joining the ambulance service (although I've got the TA AMS to thank for making me realise it was a job I wanted to do), I have seen it from all angles. I only re-joined the TA once I'd qualified as a Para (I did the technician, then Uni Diploma route) and I've been staggered at the lack of knowledge (and/or interest) that much of the AMS shows towards the profession.

I had never bothered with rank, as it simply didn't mean anything to me, as the TA was only ever a 'spare time' thing (someone on another thread accused me of wanting to go on Ops because I needed to 'prove myself' - because obviously I don't do that enough in my day job!) - but with no rank, at least with the AMS, you simply get no credit for the role you have in civvy life.

At least the RAF are doing something to address that........
 

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