Parachute Wings worn over rank?

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Saw this photo online the other day. Never seen wings worn over stripes before. Does anyone know the significance of this?

Cheers,

AP.
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
It's how they were originally worn, however this pic is a bit odd as by the date it was taken, the usual method had been adopted, possibly either A) an early attempt at being ally or B) For some reason he had to use an old smock, it's also notable that he wasn't in all likelihood jumping as the Sten would be under the harness
 
Don’t look now Corporal, but you’re about to meet the Queen and your gimp maskchinstrap is inside out.

And what fcuking dîckhead gave the King a map?
 
It's how they were originally worn, however this pic is a bit odd as by the date it was taken, the usual method had been adopted, possibly either A) an early attempt at being ally or B) For some reason he had to use an old smock, it's also notable that he wasn't in all likelihood jumping as the Sten would be under the harness

Ta very much!
 
View attachment 620169

Saw this photo online the other day. Never seen wings worn over stripes before. Does anyone know the significance of this?

Cheers,

AP.

WW2.... back in the day some regiments wore their B grade and above Small Arms Instructors crossed rifles over their chevrons...perhaps he was from one of those units prior to volunteering for Airborne Forces and followed suit.
Whatever the reason that young lad probably dropped at Arnhem...in my mind he can wear them how he likes!
 
FWIW, some research into the photo suggests that they may be Canadians.

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It's how they were originally worn, however this pic is a bit odd as by the date it was taken, the usual method had been adopted, possibly either A) an early attempt at being ally or B) For some reason he had to use an old smock, it's also notable that he wasn't in all likelihood jumping as the Sten would be under the harness

I've seen some suggestions - but not sure how credible they are - that the Canadians continued this practice for some time after we did, and that it ceased to become common only after the end of the war; I have seen a photo dating from the mid-50s of an old and bold Sergeant who was still wearing a badge (couldn't tell what) directly on top of his stripes.
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
FWIW, some research into the photo suggests that they may be Canadians.

View attachment 620175



I've seen some suggestions - but not sure how credible they are - that the Canadians continued this practice for some time after we did, and that it ceased to become common only after the end of the war; I have seen a photo dating from the mid-50s of an old and bold Sergeant who was still wearing a badge (couldn't tell what) directly on top of his stripes.
Possible, but the chap next to him has the wings in the usual place.
 
Possible, but the chap next to him has the wings in the usual place.

I don't think - pardon the unintended pun - that the habit was uniform, and I suspect that you're probably spot on with the idea that it's a old smock, or perhaps one kept for special occasions - if it's from the series of photos I think it is, then the King appears in a number of them, so best bib and tucker all round if the RSM had anything to do with it...
 
FWIW, some research into the photo suggests that they may be Canadians.

View attachment 620175



I've seen some suggestions - but not sure how credible they are - that the Canadians continued this practice for some time after we did, and that it ceased to become common only after the end of the war; I have seen a photo dating from the mid-50s of an old and bold Sergeant who was still wearing a badge (couldn't tell what) directly on top of his stripes.
Didn’t the Canadians wear a different style of wings on their chest rather than arm?
 

exspy

LE
I have seen a photo dating from the mid-50s of an old and bold Sergeant who was still wearing a badge (couldn't tell what) directly on top of his stripes.

Different Corps have different ways of indicating whether or not a sergeant is substantive or a lance appointment. In the cavalry, the practice was for a substantive sergeant to wear a cap badge (or similar metallic device) on the rank centered at the point where the chevrons meet. Other Corps had a cloth badge sewn above the chevrons. A study unto itself.
 
It's how they were originally worn, however this pic is a bit odd as by the date it was taken, the usual method had been adopted, possibly either A) an early attempt at being ally or B) For some reason he had to use an old smock, it's also notable that he wasn't in all likelihood jumping as the Sten would be under the harness

The Sten is tied down with rope. Was that a common thing? Get it into action quicker or while still dangling in the air?
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
The Sten is tied down with rope. Was that a common thing?
Honestly don't know, it might be a toggle rope but looks a bit narrow, but if he jumps like that he's likely to get it full in the face. another thing that along with the chin strap, looks like he was hastily dragged into the picture.
 
View attachment 620169

Saw this photo online the other day. Never seen wings worn over stripes before. Does anyone know the significance of this?

Cheers,

AP.
The picture appears on page 90 of the book "Go To It" The Illustrated History of The 6th Airborne Division. First published in 1990 by Peter Harclerode.

The caption reads:

Queen Elizebeth is seen here talking to Corporal 'Jungle' Jones of 22 Independent Parachute Company. Before enlisting, Corporal Jones was a physical training instructor in the Metroplolitan Police.

The Police was a reserved occupation until 1942 when younger members of the Force could volunteer to join the military. Many joined the Commandos, Airborne Forces and became Aircrew in Bomber Command.

John Durnford-Slater , the CO of 3 Army Commando related in his history of 3 Commando that in 1942 after the losses the Commando had received at Dieppe, he contacted the Commando Training Depot in Scotland. They had just finished training 600 volunteers from the Police.

He said "This intake of police was perfect Commando materiel. The men were big, strong and intelligent and had all their police discipline and training behind them. They were real volunteers, keen for the contest. I had 120 of them posted to 3 Commando. This was the best single intake we ever received and every man was a potential leader; many of course were later commissioned and others exerted a fine influence as senior NCO's."
 
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