Parachute Course-Balloon

Blimey... I dunno now. :oops: Or was it an Andover crash in... Cyprus? ISTR a PJI getting an AFM for something.
 
No, that was an incident which occurred at Shobdon ( Herefordshire). It was on a sport para sortie with the despatcher, an SAS soldier, Sgt. Mick Reeves in control. Mick got the GC.

Mick's actions became the BPA SOP for such incidents, should they occur and called for an integral brief on students undertaking their initial static- line phase.

Mick continued his military career post demob from Uk Forces, with the Rhodesian SAS.
Only works if the jumper is still attached to the static line. We had a fatality where the canopy deployed and departed from the bag, only to get hooked on the tail wheel of the PC6. He wasn't taught to use the Capewells to release the main so ended up landing with the aircraft.

JM wanted to climb down the static line and try to swing across, but that would have left an aircraft full of unattended studes in even more shit if things went sideways.

They put down as short as possible in the grass along the side of the runway, but he'd also lost his helmet and didn't survive. Not sure the helmet would have helped anyway.

The pilot of the PC6 later died when the Spitfire he was flying torque rolled into the ground turning final.
 
Blimey... I dunno now. :oops: Or was it an Andover crash in... Cyprus? ISTR a PJI getting an AFM for something.
The Andover crash was in !972 in Siena, Italy. The Falcons had undertaken a parachute display sortie and climbed back on board. The pilot undertook a tactical take-off for the air display crowd. Some technical issue arose with one of the engines, causing the airframe to 'cartwheel' down the runway. All of the crew and three PJI's were killed in the incident.

Following impact, the surviving Falcons, managed to find a split in the fuselage and crawl free. Some horrific photographs at the time in the public domain on that incident.

I'm not aware of any AFM's being awarded following that incident, though I know of three gents in particular who should have received some award of merit for their actions on the day.
 
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The Andover crash was in !972 in Siena, Italy. The Falcons had undertaken a parachute display sortie and climbed back on board. The pilot undertook a tactical take-off for the air display crowd. Some technical issue arose with one of the engines, causing the airframe to 'cartwheel' down the runway. All of the crew and three PJI's were killed in the incident.

Following impact, the surviving Falcons, managed to find a split in the fuselage and crawl free. Some horrific photographs at the time in the public domain on that incident.

I'm not aware of any AFM's being awarded following that incident, though I know of three gents in particular who should have received some award of merit for their actions on the day.
I was on a Skyvan load at Sibson when Ronnie O'brien, at significant risk to himself, saved the life of an unconscious tandem master Mike Smith, and passenger.


At the BPA AGM a few months later when it was announced FAI Man of the Year .....Ronnie O'brien everyone in the room leapt off their chairs and were spontaneously roaring.

It was a powerful moment.
 
I landed on a kid on his bike there. No amount of shouting at him would get him to move.
No chance of steering away?

During my time as a part-time paragliding instructor I witnessed many amusing landings involving livestock, lone trees and a student's cars. It wasn't uncommon for a descending student to fixate on an object in the turkey patch (landing zone) and bee line for it.

The first proper flights are off a 200' hill and are is pretty gentle, however occasionally a honking thermal would push through, sucking the shocked student well above take off. 500' ATO was not impossible on their first flight. At this point they would have more than likely adopted the 'starfish': a position consisting of fully widespread, rigid arms and legs and a rictus grin of fear. The student pilot would also be oblivious to our shouts of encouragement and advice. Leaving them to their fate, the school's CFI, Rick, would watch them drift away over the back of the hill and declare to the watching students 'Bigeye will be be hosing down that harness tonight'.

The canopy we use is all about weight shift and so it's probable that the terrified student would look at the earthbound object thinking: 'Shite, a big cow, I really want to land but I mustn't bloody hit that...' whilst continuing to stare at it and turn towards the thing.. until finally the indignant friesian is unceremoniously mounted.
 
No chance of steering away?

During my time as a part-time paragliding instructor I witnessed many amusing landings involving livestock, lone trees and a student's cars. It wasn't uncommon for a descending student to fixate on an object in the turkey patch (landing zone) and bee line for it.

The first proper flights are off a 200' hill and are is pretty gentle, however occasionally a honking thermal would push through, sucking the shocked student well above take off. 500' ATO was not impossible on their first flight. At this point they would have more than likely adopted the 'starfish': a position consisting of fully widespread, rigid arms and legs and a rictus grin of fear. The student pilot would also be oblivious to our shouts of encouragement and advice. Leaving them to their fate, the school's CFI, Rick, would watch them drift away over the back of the hill and declare to the watching students 'Bigeye will be be hosing down that harness tonight'.

The canopy we use is all about weight shift and so it's probable that the terrified student would look at the earthbound object thinking: 'Shite, a big cow, I really want to land but I mustn't bloody hit that...' whilst continuing to stare at it and turn towards the thing.. until finally the indignant friesian is unceremoniously mounted.
:) :) You obviously never jumped a PX mk5
 
:) :) You obviously never jumped a PX mk5
No hauling on the risers then!

I've taught a few parachutists to convert to paragliding and the hardest task is getting them not to stall through using too much brake. We turn with our arrse cheeks and gentle dabs on the brake-lines.
 
No chance of steering away?

During my time as a part-time paragliding instructor I witnessed many amusing landings involving livestock, lone trees and a student's cars. It wasn't uncommon for a descending student to fixate on an object in the turkey patch (landing zone) and bee line for it.

The first proper flights are off a 200' hill and are is pretty gentle, however occasionally a honking thermal would push through, sucking the shocked student well above take off. 500' ATO was not impossible on their first flight. At this point they would have more than likely adopted the 'starfish': a position consisting of fully widespread, rigid arms and legs and a rictus grin of fear. The student pilot would also be oblivious to our shouts of encouragement and advice. Leaving them to their fate, the school's CFI, Rick, would watch them drift away over the back of the hill and declare to the watching students 'Bigeye will be be hosing down that harness tonight'.

The canopy we use is all about weight shift and so it's probable that the terrified student would look at the earthbound object thinking: 'Shite, a big cow, I really want to land but I mustn't bloody hit that...' whilst continuing to stare at it and turn towards the thing.. until finally the indignant friesian is unceremoniously mounted.
The moth to a flame bit seems to be common to a lot of landing cenarios.
I did a couple of summers teaching off Pilling sands south of Lancaster.
When the tides were low you had got 5 miles by half a mile of pristine sand with nowt to hit. well I say that but there was the odd sunken cars roof here and there and the occasional post from shrimp netting that stuck out of the sand maybe a foot. You would swear there was a tractor beam or a rope hauling the student in on finals.On a. Calm day I even reversed the circuit to see if there was a left/ right bias going on.No the buggers just reversed the swing and still headed towards doom.
 
The moth to a flame bit seems to be common to a lot of landing cenarios.
I did a couple of summers teaching off Pilling sands south of Lancaster.
When the tides were low you had got 5 miles by half a mile of pristine sand with nowt to hit. well I say that but there was the odd sunken cars roof here and there and the occasional post from shrimp netting that stuck out of the sand maybe a foot. You would swear there was a tractor beam or a rope hauling the student in on finals.On a. Calm day I even reversed the circuit to see if there was a left/ right bias going on.No the buggers just reversed the swing and still headed towards doom.
We used to use 'big hands' to direct the student when to initiate a turn. The problem was that we were facing the buggers as they worked along the ridge so we would have to show the opposite direction. Inevitably the instructor...(ahem, me) would get confused causing the student to turn sharply the wrong way into a fence or somesuch.

The all time classic bit of mis-instruction happened at the top of Baba Dag in Turkey. Take off is 7000' above the beach at Olu Deniz.
The instructor for the SIV course was watching a student working their way along the ridge with binos.

The student kept coming up on the radio saying that they felt they were too low on the ridge line and were really worried they were going to go over the back of the mountain. Butterfly Botha, the instructor, distracted by beach babes, repeated that the student was fine and to plough on. Unfortunately Butterfly was observing the wrong wing. The actual student was indeed too low and ended up heading downwind on the wrong side of the Mountain, flying into the middle of Fuckarwe.

It took the poor sod 2 days to walk out of the valley. He said he'd been pursued by bears and homosexual Turkish mountain men... but that was probably the dehydration.
 
Only works if the jumper is still attached to the static line. We had a fatality where the canopy deployed and departed from the bag, only to get hooked on the tail wheel of the PC6. He wasn't taught to use the Capewells to release the main so ended up landing with the aircraft.

JM wanted to climb down the static line and try to swing across, but that would have left an aircraft full of unattended studes in even more shit if things went sideways.

They put down as short as possible in the grass along the side of the runway, but he'd also lost his helmet and didn't survive. Not sure the helmet would have helped anyway.

The pilot of the PC6 later died when the Spitfire he was flying torque rolled into the ground turning final.
Was that Jack Malloch? The Rhodesian sanctions buster in his DC7.
 
Nope. Snox was flying. Think the bloke's name was Justus someoneorother. MM was the JM.

No chance of steering away?

During my time as a part-time paragliding instructor I witnessed many amusing landings involving livestock, lone trees and a student's cars. It wasn't uncommon for a descending student to fixate on an object in the turkey patch (landing zone) and bee line for it.

The first proper flights are off a 200' hill and are is pretty gentle, however occasionally a honking thermal would push through, sucking the shocked student well above take off. 500' ATO was not impossible on their first flight. At this point they would have more than likely adopted the 'starfish': a position consisting of fully widespread, rigid arms and legs and a rictus grin of fear. The student pilot would also be oblivious to our shouts of encouragement and advice. Leaving them to their fate, the school's CFI, Rick, would watch them drift away over the back of the hill and declare to the watching students 'Bigeye will be be hosing down that harness tonight'.

The canopy we use is all about weight shift and so it's probable that the terrified student would look at the earthbound object thinking: 'Shite, a big cow, I really want to land but I mustn't bloody hit that...' whilst continuing to stare at it and turn towards the thing.. until finally the indignant friesian is unceremoniously mounted.
Did something similar landing on a barbed wire fence once. round canopy so limited steering. Still have the scars on my abdomen where the thing snagged me under the reserve and opened me up.

Seen a lot of target fixation by studes as well. Even on square canopies with a lot of maneauvrability, they manage to hit vehicles, power lines and anything else that worries them. Experienced it as well going into tight DZs but making a conscious effort and a strongly developed sense of survival helps.

Also had it and seen it in free fall when tracking away from a formation and fixating on the ground. Took a bit of thought to drag my eyes off the rapidly approaching oblate spheroid and fumble for the pilot chute.
 

JJWRacing

Clanker
Over Sennybridge B, mid 90's. I was at No.7 Starboard, after exiting the aircraft, I found that the MT SNCO still hanging outside the plane. I then proceeded to stove his head in with my size 9's and knocking him off the dope rope. He landed with no helmet, broken nose, jaw and palate. The BOI was interesting as it was conducted during our FF program. First question I was asked was why did you leave the plane if he was still the there, I said he had left the aircraft he had gone, how the hell did I know he was hanging around outside!!!
 

giatttt

Old-Salt
No hauling on the risers then!

I've taught a few parachutists to convert to paragliding and the hardest task is getting them not to stall through using too much brake. We turn with our arrse cheeks and gentle dabs on the brake-lines.
Some of the lads in Aberdeen got really into paragliding, one of them forgot what he was doing and hauled down on both risers as he was coming into land. He wasn't badly injured, but he wasn't running around for a few months.
 
Regarding the footage of the bloke tangled, at first I thought it was a balloon jump but I thought the ballon was finished in the early 90s?
 
Over Sennybridge B, mid 90's. I was at No.7 Starboard, after exiting the aircraft, I found that the MT SNCO still hanging outside the plane. I then proceeded to stove his head in with my size 9's and knocking him off the dope rope. He landed with no helmet, broken nose, jaw and palate. The BOI was interesting as it was conducted during our FF program. First question I was asked was why did you leave the plane if he was still the there, I said he had left the aircraft he had gone, how the hell did I know he was hanging around outside!!!
What unit were you out of curiosity?
 

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