Panasonic Viera TV won't switch on

What kit/leads do you need to do that?

A mate has given me a 42" flatscreen he no longer wanted, and since I do everything via my PC and a 32" curved monitor, I can't currently find a use for it, or work out how I could connect it to my home network.
What's the make and model, some have wifi built in, some have a LAN port, some would need a PC or media server connected via HDMI or a VGA input.
 
Brian the guitar playing TV repair man is going to see if there is any hope for the dear old telly tomorrow.
Fingers crossed, will keep you posted as to what is wrong, if it's a common fault, and how to fix it (or not, as the case may be)
:)
 
Brian the guitar playing TV repair man is going to see if there is any hope for the dear old telly tomorrow.
Fingers crossed, will keep you posted as to what is wrong, if it's a common fault, and how to fix it (or not, as the case may be)
:)
Best of luck.
 
Many of the problems with the larger TV's is heat build-up when they are too close to radiators, or other heat generating appliances.

If there is a vent at the back, try pouring a significant quantity of water on it.
 
Many of the problems with the larger TV's is heat build-up when they are too close to radiators, or other heat generating appliances.

If there is a vent at the back, try pouring a significant quantity of water on it.
Top tip!
Would tea/red wine/orangina be an acceptable substitute?
As the tap is a long way from the TV.
:)
 
Top tip!
Would tea/red wine/orangina be an acceptable substitute?
As the tap is a long way from the TV.
:)
I'm no expert but I believe a diet vimto aids conductivity. Something to do with the saccharine.
 
Before I call the repair man, any ideas?
I have Googled it and no joy. The red stand by light is on, but it just flickers on and off without changing to green when I press the on button, on the remote.
Yes, I have switched it off and on again at the wall.
And switched the Interweb off and on again.
:rolleyes:
What was the outcome? If TV is no more can I buy remote off you please. Mines gone AWOL
 
Probably not helped by killing the power at the wall every night instead of leaving it in standby, if that is your habit. Probably succumbed to one too many start-up surges. As said already, easier/cheaper to buy a nice shiny new one than get it fixed, unless it's a simple back off, basic component out, new component in, back on job.

Alternatively, source a hammer. If in doubt, give it a clout.
Brian reckons better to turn TV off at night/when not in use.
:rolleyes:
 
Switch it on.
Press one then proceed to factory setup.
He's on Yell.com TV repairs Brian Williams.
Apparently, he has had similar problems with other TVs recently.
Samsung notably.
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
Switch it on.
Press one then proceed to factory setup.
He's on Yell.com TV repairs Brian Williams.
Apparently, he has had similar problems with other TVs recently.
Samsung notably.
Did you ask him about horizontal blue lines?
 
Now that's sorted my Sony has developed a small bluefish line that runs horizontaly across the screen about a quarter of the way up, it's about the same thickness as a pencil line and is damn annoying. It's a 40" LCD HD about nine years old. No I didn't crayon on it after Utds last match.

Any ideas?
A bit late I know, but it could be a problem with the tuna.







Sorry.
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
A bit late I know, but it could be a problem with the tuna.







Sorry.
Oh dear me. All solved, it's in a skip down the tip and I have a new one. It's smaller but the screen is bigger. I can't believe how slim these new tv's are , the technology has come on since I was a young kid and you had to give it 5 minutes to warm up!
 
If anyone bumps into this thread searching for inspiration on how to revive their Panasonic Viera Plasma telly and can't get the thing to come to its senses with combinations of buttons held down and swearing, there is a likely and cheap to fix alternative.
Panasonic, along with many other makes had(/have?) problems with duff capacitors affecting products ranging from wall-wart transformers to high end tvs. After a few years (7-8 in the case of my Home Theatre, DVD Recorder and now TV) the goo inside fails and the capacitors, usually on the power supply board, blow. The telly then goes into the originally described mode of red light on - flashes when the remote is activated, but no turn-on.
The parts are cheap and available; my DVD Rec needed about 6 caps, totaling under £10, the telly, 1 biggie, costing under £6. RS components do them post free!
Armed with the knowledge of the likely cause, if you can't DIY, it should be possible to circumvent the sucked teeth and exorbitant estimate of a competent repairer, by looking like you know a bit.
The back of the set is easy to remove (but bloody sharp!). Give the set a day to discharge and DON'T poke fingers in as any good capacitor can give a belt (ahem!) Discharge with a good bit of wire to an earth. Tell-tale signs of duff caps are gunge leaking from burst tops or bases, or more likely, bulged tops.


Last year I got the DVD Rec going for under £10 and would have got the Home Theatre going for about the same, if I hadn't fried an amplfier chip with an errant soldering iron shorting an undischarged cap (hence warning above!).
I managed to get my 50" Viera up and running again for £6, but found that it had developed a screen based 'buzz' that drove me nuts. I rushed out and spent mucho dosho on a LG OLED, to be told by my next door neighbour electronics geek that it was probably down to the new cap providing more power to the system and it would probably burn in. After 2 days being left on as my new PC monitor (I'm going to go blind, before I find the porn) and it's quieting down already.
OOPS!
 

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