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Paint & Tools Paint Sticky

Daz

LE
As a result of the Airbrush sticky, once again me & @Dads203 have been jiffied to start a new sticky, this time on “Paint” to supersede the previous “Paint & Tools Etc” thread, so as a starter I volunteered to repost some previous reviews of mine while @Dads203 sorts out the grown-up parts.


So, without any further adieu, here’s the review of the AK Interactive Acrylic WW2 IJN Aircraft colours boxed set first posted in 2017
s-l1600.jpg


As is standard for AK Interactive Acrylic sets, it comes in a sturdy end opening box with a pull-out tray, unlike the Vallejo equivalent that comes with a top opening flap and loose bottles – inside the box, the set comprises of 8 bottles of the following paints:

_ AK2061 J3 HAI-RO (Grey)
_ AK2062 J3 SP (Amber Grey)
_ AK2063 D1 Deep Green Black
_ AK2064 D2 Green Black
_ AK2065 C2 Trainer Yellow
_ AK2066 Q1 Anti-Glare Blue-Black
_ AK2067 M3 (M) Mitsubishi Interior Green
_ AK2068 M3 (N) Nakajima Interior Green


Colour matching can be quite hard to quantify, as it depends on the source you use, however, these paints do seem to be a close match to real-life examples, so I’m happy with them.

As to the quality of the paint, I was impressed, at the time I’d only tested the Nakajima Interior Green at that stage, but it spayed wonderfully without any thinners added at around 8-9 PSI, with no clogging in evidence – normally, using Vallejo at that pressure means using thinners/retarders and a lot of tip cleaning, which is a bit of a pain.
The paint was sprayed with an el-cheapo airbrush rather than anything fancy, so anyone with a better airbrush should archive great results – test shot below.
Paint 2.jpg


Since then, the sets been used for other projects such as Tamiya 148 Kawanishi N1K1 KYOFU Type 11 and the Tamiya Nakajima Saiun (Myrt) C6N1 using most of the colours in the set including the weird blue/black so beloved by the IJN & IJA.

3.jpgIMG_20200608_205750_edited.jpgIMG_20200608_205826_edited.jpg

One thing to note is that the paint can be a bit delicate, so clear coating with varnish is a must otherwise you could rub some of the paint off while handling it.

Most online stockists seem to carry it in stock, prices range between £16 & £20 depending on if the sets on offer, even at £20, it's worth the money if you’re building WW2 IJN aircraft.
 

Daz

LE
Here’s another paint review from a little while back, in this case, it was the go-to set for the Pacific Group Build as recommended by @Simmerit, it’s the Vallejo Model Air Set 71.157 US NAVY & USMC Colours WWII 1940-1945
us 1.jpg




This set comes in Vallejo standard box with a top opening flap and loose bottles inside, not quite up to the standard of the AK boxing reviewed previously, but it is up to the job and it’s not really a deal-breaker, but it does mean that the paints can’t be stored close to hand resting in the tray– inside the box, there’s the standard colour chart applicable to this set with suggested schemes along with 8 bottles of the following paints:

· 71.109 Faded P.R.U. Blue
· 71.121 Light Gull Grey
· 71.277 Dark Gull Grey
· 71.279 Insignia White
· 71.295 USN Sea Blue
· 71.298 M495 Light Grey
· 71.299 Intermediate Blue
· 71.300 Glossy Sea Blue



As noted on previous reviews, colour matching can be quite hard to quantify, as it depends on the source you use and what source the paint makers used, saying that, there have been no complaints by any of the builds participants as to colour matching.

As for the quality of the paint, I’ve had no real problems with them apart from weather-related issues – spraying during the hot weather was a bit of a pain due to how quick the paint dried, so I can’t blame the paint for that, however, as noted on the last review, acrylics can be fussing when handling as its quite delicate until varnished.

If you are going to be using thinners/retarders, the makers do recommend that you use Vallejo’s own items, however, I tend to use whatever’s lying around the workbench, such as Tamiya’s thinners with no adverse effects. Other people, however, have different thoughts & experiences so it might be wise to experiment on some scrap first if you’re not going to follow the manufacture's guidelines.

I would reiterant that acrylics can be prone to chipping & scratching, so it’s recommended that you do use a decent basecoat/undercoat, followed by a clear varnish coat when using them.

The only addition to the set that most modellers might not have in the paintbox is Vallejo Model Air 71.091 Signal Blue – You’ll need that if you fancy doing your own markings, see Si’s SBD build for inspiration

3 of the colours used on a Hellcat
side.jpg
 
Outstanding post.

To be honest, I'm just hanging about waiting for someone to post the thread titled "Glue Sticky".

I have several replies I shall be wanting to post.
 

Daz

LE
excellent Daz, a sticky on paint is a good idea, such a massive subject.
The idea in its current guise came from @Simmerit & @Helm - Mind you, this is the second attempt at a paint based thread :)

All contributions are welcome BTW
 

Daz

LE
If you can find the time, could you do a bit of a tutorial on the white glue glazing technique please.
In the glue thread that it :)
 

Daz

LE
I'm noticing an increased use of oil paints for blending and shading in certain corners of the miniature scene. Is anyone looking at or experimenting with those?
Paging @Helm
 
I was always a fan of Vallejo acrylics but they are not the best to spray with so I've ended up putting stacks of flow enhancer in with the paint to stop it clogging up the end of the airbrush. What you also find with it is it the finish is inconsistent. As I am a sad b@stard, I was discussing this on the blower with @Dads203 this morning. Sad but true......

I am currently switching over to MRP lacquer at a rapid rate on knots. It has the texture of water, so a very different air brush experience and the finish is factory - like the plane (in this case) has just been wheeled out of the paint shop. It's stunning. For those of you who have used it, its very much like Alclad - another amazing paint.

Paint technology is moving on a lot. I'd say for the more enthusiastic modeller (sad cnut to non-modellers), lacquer is the way forward. Its certainly where I'm heading anyway.
 
It's difficult for me to recommend a product like this as 1. It's £17 notes a box and 2. they are only good when used through and airbrush, useless for paint brushes, but for ready mixed shades of Olive drab, I can't fault it, in fact I'm going to get another box of this when these run out.
life colour US OD.jpg

lifecolour paints are water based or Acrylic, you can thin them with water, never tried it myself as, like I say, £17 a box, I used Humbrol ACRYLIC thinner (£5) before it goes through the airbrush, using a macdonalds coffee stirring stick, (other fast food outlets are available) when it's in the feed bowl of the airbrush, never spray on the model prior to a test spray on newspaper, if it splutters, you'll have spoilt your finish and will have to wipe and re start. But this set provides very realistic tones of olive drab.
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
I'm noticing an increased use of oil paints for blending and shading in certain corners of the miniature scene. Is anyone looking at or experimenting with those?
Big fan of oils, especially for faces and leather etc where you want a slight sheen. Pros you can blend and shade as you go as there is a long drying time, con there's a long drying time and they take a bit of practice. If there's a degree of interest I can do a SBS next time I start a figure.
 

Dads203

Old-Salt
MRP is one of those breakthrough products in my book, fantastic stuff. Sprays beautifully and drys in minutes. 5 quid a bottle so it’s a tad more expensive than most paints but by god it’s worth the extra few quid.
The primer coat has to be flawless though as it will show every lump, bump and scratch.
 

ches

LE
Ref oils. If you're going to be doing any blending, using subtle shades & the like esp for flesh painting then I'd recommend use of a wet palette. Since i discovered the delights of having one, a few years ago I've found oil work a real pleasure (for the most part). A wet palette gives you excellent opportunity to keep tweaking your work days down the line without the paint in the palette drying out requiring you to re-mix. Great idea.
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
Ref oils. If you're going to be doing any blending, using subtle shades & the like esp for flesh painting then I'd recommend use of a wet palette. Since i discovered the delights of having one, a few years ago I've found oil work a real pleasure (for the most part). A wet palette gives you excellent opportunity to keep tweaking your work days down the line without the paint in the palette drying out requiring you to re-mix. Great idea.
Oils don't usually need a wet palette, AFAIK that's an acrylics thing. Oils can be kept in the fridge if you want to preserve them longer but you're usually good for at least 4-5 days. You can also always revitalise oils with a drop of turps/white spirit if they are getting dry. Just remember to use a bit of cardboard to absorb the oil before you paint it on else it can dry glossy.
 

ches

LE
I've used it for both tbh, for acrylics its a must do but not that common for oils. Oil does last but if mixing a colour or shade, esp only a small amount will 'skin' over & dry out pretty quickly ime. Keeping in a wet palette (should have added that I use a small amount of W&N thinner in my 'sponge' reservoir) preserves the mixed colour for a lot longer......great for building up layers of thinner paint using flesh tones for example. Obv depends on individual methods, painting flesh with oils I prefer multiple thinner coats allowing me to blend & tone things all the while.
 

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