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#1
British military loses hundreds of munitions to theft

Hundreds of munitions have been lost or stolen from the British military in the past year, according to a freedom of information request.
Bagged gunpower, electric detonators, boom charges and hundreds of bullets for rifles and compact submachine guns are among the items that have gone missing.
A Glock 17 handgun was also reported stolen from an armoury in Barbados, prompting the arrest and questioning of two local men. In addition more than 165 5.56mm cartridges, which are used in M16 assault rifles and the M4 carbines, disappeared.
The revelation follows a spate of other losses and thefts from the UK armed forces over the past decade, during which hundreds of guns have been left unaccounted for, including machine guns and pistols.
What are you lot doing these days? Back in the mists we had Chubbs, Ingersolls and MkIV Manifoils, not to mention Key Registers. Spending too much time on Diversity Training, no doubt, and too little on the grubby Trade. I am disappointed.
 
#2
Fings ain't wot they used ter be guv.

I wonder what a Glock was doing in Barbados, apart from getting lost (stolen, more like), obviously.
 

Purple_Flash

ADC
Moderator
#3
I like the idea of ‘bagged gunpower’ (sic). Are we still hanging onto War Stocks of the Brown Bess, just in case Boneparte comes back to life?
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
#4
Fings ain't wot they used ter be guv.

I wonder what a Glock was doing in Barbados, apart from getting lost (stolen, more like), obviously.
It heard a song on the radio and realised there were more favourable climes in which to cap someone's ass:

 
#5
Fings ain't wot they used ter be guv.

I wonder what a Glock was doing in Barbados, apart from getting lost (stolen, more like), obviously.
Yes, that well known London Borough, Barbados.

Maybe there is a training team out there.

As for:

In addition more than 165 5.56mm cartridges, which are used in M16 assault rifles and the M4 carbines, disappeared.
That wouldn't even cover a good range morning.
 
#6
Yes, that well known London Borough, Barbados.

Maybe there is a training team out there.

As for:



That wouldn't even cover a good range morning.
Hmm, a training team. Ours or theirs?
 
#8
British military loses hundreds of munitions to theft



What are you lot doing these days? Back in the mists we had Chubbs, Ingersolls and MkIV Manifoils, not to mention Key Registers. Spending too much time on Diversity Training, no doubt, and too little on the grubby Trade. I am disappointed.
Its ok the 5.56 round is reported as being used in the M16 and M4 carbine. Must have been stolen from THEM, who else uses these rifles in the British military!

Wonder if the reporter thinks we use the M!6.

You can do a FOI to find this info out but can't google to see what the British military rifle is. Maybe they just think the public assume we use M16s
 
#9
165 cartridges of the assault rifle type 5.56 mm have gone missing. Bad boys could use them to (GASP!) fire dangerous M16s and M4s (in full auto, no doubt) in the nearest high street. Nans pulling their shopping trollies are in danger! Who writes this stuff? :? Did they figure there wouldn't be any SA-80s at large in criminal hands that use this cartridge too? Maybe the writer figures that the discerning terrorist prefers to use an M-4 or M-16 to shoot up Dodge instead of the problematical SA-80 that hardly any body else uses.
 
#10
165 cartridges of the assault rifle type 5.56 mm have gone missing. Bad boys could use them to (GASP!) fire dangerous M16s and M4s (in full auto, no doubt) in the nearest high street. Nans pulling their shopping trollies are in danger! Who writes this stuff? :? Did they figure there wouldn't be any SA-80s at large in criminal hands that use this cartridge too? Maybe the writer figures that the discerning terrorist prefers to use an M-4 or M-16 to shoot up Dodge instead of the problematical SA-80 that hardly any body else uses.

If it had been 7.62mm no doubt they would have said as used in the AK47, GASP HORROR, even though it's a different round.

You were doing so well until the problematical SA80 bit. It is 2018 not 1985, the weapon has evolved a bit.
 
#12
Meh. Amateurs. This was lifted from a naval base, the navy not being known for their alliness in the first place. Imagine the amount of stuff going missing from police stations and military bases.

The remaining R1/FAL rifles were destroyed in the early years of the ANC regime being in power. Reason being that of the entire lot they could only account for a few, thousands having gone missing the minute the keys to the armouries were handed over to the new dispensation.

Firearms surrendered to the cops have a bad habit of getting themselves sold to gang members out the back door of police stations, not to mention serving police renting their weapons to criminals to commit robberies and hijackings (that's if the cop himself is not taking part as a member of the gang).

Arms theft apparently only the tip of the iceberg at Naval Base Simon’s Town
Written by defenceWeb, Thursday, 28 July 2016

The situation at Naval Base Simon’s Town is critical and an investigation, in the interests of every dedicated sailor – and South Africa – is overdue, according to the Chief Whip of the Western Cape provincial parliament, who was reacting to the theft of arms and ammunition from the base.

Firearms, ammunition and hand grenades were stolen from six storerooms at base’s armoury. The Hawks are investigating the matter but no arrests have been made so far.

According to The Times, some of the items stolen in the burglary included 77 hand grenades, Uzi submachineguns and R1 assault rifles. A military source told the publication that 12.7 mm and 20 mm weapons as well as explosives may also have been taken, but an audit is being conducted. Another source said four Uzis, 72 grenades and at least one R1 assault rifle were stolen.

Democratic Alliance Chief Whip Mark Wiley maintains in a statement the theft, last weekend, could have been prevented had the (naval) authorities done their duty many months ago when, on several occasions, they had been warned of a climate a lawlessness and decay taking hold in parts of the base.

“This can potentially contaminate the very institution of the Navy, whose primary mission is to protect the country’s coastal sovereignty,” he said adding he was calling for a Commission of Inquiry into the management of the base which, in addition to being fleet headquarters also houses the dockyard and the Institute for Maritime Technology (IMT).

Wiley, who is also the Democratic Alliance’s (DA) constituency head in the area including Simon’s Town, said he had received information from “several reliable sources of alleged criminal behaviour and abuse of power which no armed service can tolerate”.

The allegations include racism, political favouritism and factionalism, interference in functions, breaching of finance and security protocols, unauthorised use of vehicles, theft of equipment and stores, dereliction of duty and conduct unbecoming, heritage violations and “alarmingly, allegations of seditious (possibly treasonous) behaviour”.

He said informants did not want to lay charges fearing “intimidation or worse”.

Wiley said his “long association” with South Africa’s military had precluded him for making political mileage out of the issue but he had reported incidents to police and the Hawks, as well as advising his informants to do the same.

“The fact that many of these allegations point to the involvement of officers of high rank, one in particular, indicates a grave situation. It is also alleged that the responsible Minister has tried to protect one or several individuals from being disciplined and overruled a recommendation by the Chief of the Navy to transfer a senior admiral to Pretoria while an investigation was about to happen. This has entrenched a culture of hopelessness, fear and silence,” Wiley said.

He also maintains relationship with the local community – “a navy town” – are strained and at times alienated.

“This cannot continue. People who are privileged to lead our armed services have to be above reproach – morally and professionally. Individuals who tolerate a culture of ill-discipline, contempt for the rule of law, entitlement and empire building have no place in a nation’s military. This is how ‘war lords’ take root,” he said.

Western Cape Community Safety MEC Dan Plato said the theft of firearms from Simon’s Town will impact the safety of local residents as they weapons will likely end up being used by gangsters. He said there were other burglaries at the base in March and April this year.

"The police deny knowledge of these burglaries but we continue to receive information about them and this is the third security breach at the base."

Earlier this month Afrikaans newspaper Rapport revealed that security contracts for five of the country’s biggest munitions depots had lapse after the military failed to pay security contractors.
 
#13
Who writes this stuff?
People who think that if it meets these criteria:-

a) It has an engine
b) It is green
c) It does not have rotors
c) It belongs to the army

then it is a tank.

Y'know - morons.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#14
Good job he only asked about munitions!
Imagine the answer if the FOI request had asked for everything nicked from the military.
The number of Stalwarts would have been interesting. :biggrin:
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#17
Black powder? RCK? Camouflet charge?

No .No. No.
To be fair it said gunpowder, any propellant falls into this category. As I recall the RCK was sealed units.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#20
Wasn't part of it a bg of some kind of powereded explosive?...
Bagged HE isn't propellant, well not a safe one for any form of gun you want to use twice and survive firing but yes its a bagged high explosive.
70feb79d-1de7-4ef6-af21-92e8ccd5cde5Rapid-Crater-Kit.jpg
 

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