packing a bergen

#1
i know this basic stuff but iv never got system right for packing a bergin for excercise, anyone got any tips for a good organised system, they pass on would be a big help. thank you
 
#2
Don't ask questions like that on this site - most of the cold war warriors on here will most proberly not of been on exercise since 1971. They'll tell you, you don't need one of them 'rucksack' thingys - just line your large pack with a bin liner!!!!

Don't know what role your in or where your exercising - so best bet is to ask one of the senior blokes.
 
#3
Don't ask questions like that on this site - most of the cold war warriors on here will most proberly not of been on exercise since 1971. They'll tell you, you don't need one of them 'rucksack' thingys - just line your large pack with a bin liner!!!!

Don't know what role your in or where your exercising - so best bet is to ask one of the senior blokes.
Indeed my ol' man was still on 37 Pattern Large pack! My old section i.c. swore by his 58 pattern large pack, his reasoning was if you have a bigger bergan you'll just fill it.
 
#4
1)Spare boots in the very bottom. (If you're taking spare boots)
2)Spare clothes next, trousers, t-shirts, norwegian, smock, socks etc etc. (waterproofed)
3)Rations next
4)Then sleeping bag last

Daysack:-

1)Wet and warm kit (gortex top, trousers and socks. Fleece and/or norwegian, gloves, shemagh)
2)24 hours rations, cooker, wash kit.
3)Spare ammo

I usually use the insertion sacks that you put in your rocket pouches to put wet/warm kit in and put in the bottom of daysack, the another insertions sack to put in rations, cooker and wash kit. Then a final insertion sack for spare ammo. Then that just leaves your webbing to put water bottles, mess tin, magazines, grenades etc in.
 
#5
1)Spare boots in the very bottom. (If you're taking spare boots)
2)Spare clothes next, trousers, t-shirts, norwegian, smock, socks etc etc. (waterproofed)
3)Rations next
4)Then sleeping bag last

Daysack:-

1)Wet and warm kit (gortex top, trousers and socks. Fleece and/or norwegian, gloves, shemagh)
2)24 hours rations, cooker, wash kit.
3)Spare ammo

I usually use the insertion sacks that you put in your rocket pouches to put wet/warm kit in and put in the bottom of daysack, the another insertions sack to put in rations, cooker and wash kit. Then a final insertion sack for spare ammo. Then that just leaves your webbing to put water bottles, mess tin, magazines, grenades etc in.
You take a spare smock? Also what is your reasoning for sleeping bag last? I got taught (work experience) you put the items in order of needing them therefore sleeping bag in bottom? Out of compression sack compressed in bivvy bag in bottom of bergan to make most of space?
KUG
 
#8
You take a spare smock? Also what is your reasoning for sleeping bag last? I got taught (work experience) you put the items in order of needing them therefore sleeping bag in bottom? Out of compression sack compressed in bivvy bag in bottom of bergan to make most of space?
KUG
Nah not always take a spare smock, some lads do though. When you get into a harbour area once your all sorted and sentry's are out the 1st thing you do is whack your poncho up, roll matt down, grot bad out, admin, sleep! If you put your grot bag at the bottom you'll be emptying the bergen out to get to it. Also if you get bugged out or go out on patrol/ops then your grot bag is the last thing you stick in the top of the bergen.
 
#9
Common loading schemes for personal kit are really just excess administrative overheads. As long as everyone has the same kit in their bergens/daysacks then that ought to be enough. If you are in an emergency and want something from somebody else's kit - then I suggest a genteel unpack/repack is unlikely to happen. In normal admin then there is time to find item A, rather than know it will be three quarters of the way up on the left hand side as per the layout diagram...because in fact it seldom is!
 
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#11
Heaviest stuff at the bottom.

Always pack it in the same way so you know what is in which pouch/pocket/half.

If you use waterproof day bags (good idea) get them in different colours that way when you trying to find something in the pitch dark in the rain with frozen fingers you don't have to go through a number of identical looking black sacks rummaging for a clean pair of socks doing a squirrel nutley imitation.

Most military service is about digging holes, sleeping in them and bit of agressive camping while wearing green camo. It's not Rambo pt3.

If you do see active service common sense is worth a lot more than any ridiculous advice from internet from what sounds like the Storemen's Auxilary Brigade.
 
#12
funny how much disagreement / variety of views.
Is there not one single guide? ie one set up for patrols etc another one for long exercises etc.
The only 'official' guide is that in the Pam,the others are all more relevant and I imagine SOPs
 
#14
i know this basic stuff but iv never got system right for packing a bergin for excercise, anyone got any tips for a good organised system, they pass on would be a big help. thank you
Pack kit in the reverse order of likely need, if possible weight distribution close to the body and high. Clear poly bags for all and remember weight... one mess tin, half a toothbrush, no luxuries... Padding the straps and frame should not be necessary but make sure it fits perfect!
 
#17
i know this basic stuff but iv never got system right for packing a bergin for excercise, anyone got any tips for a good organised system, they pass on would be a big help. thank you
I'm afraid my batman isn't around to ask old boy.

Gentleman's relish and hip flask in top left smock pocket. Clean hankie and spangles in trouser pocket

I reckon gonk bag on top is a habit from 58 large pack days.

Commonsense says you put what you need most often on the top. If my brief Royal Signals experience, before going back to Infantry, is true then that confirms gonk bag on top.
 
#18
- Heaviest items at the bottom (ie sleeping bag)
- If possible soft items againist the back
- Most likely to be required in a hurry at the top or side pouch
 
#19
This idea of heaviest at the lowest point of the bergan really will **** up your lower back. heaviest at the top to keep the spine as upright as possible and pull your shoulder blades straight for best posture.
 
#20
Heaviest at the top is in line with ergonomics/biomechanics/Alexander principle etc. Moreover it is the heaviest stuff you carry - batteries, ammo etc. that usually is what you want in a hurry, early doors.
 
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