Pack material life expectancy

Hi I was recommended military gear for durability for proper hikes. So I use Snugpak sleeping bags etc, if it can pass NSN muster it must be more than a gimmick.

I got a few packs in 1000d in different colours because they were described as durable and I can prepack them and know what I want for where I'm going as they are colour coded.

Exactly how long are these things expected to last? It was plenty durable for two trips. The bottom of it, where it would rest on the ground, has abrasions heading towards hole formation. I may have packed it with a pointy thing in that location and created a pressure point, but this is supposed to be super thick and durable.

Is this normal? What type of life expectancy should I expect from this type of gear?

Can I mush some super glue in to the abrasions to enhance it?

What's the story here?
 
Hi I was recommended military gear for durability for proper hikes. So I use Snugpak sleeping bags etc, if it can pass NSN muster it must be more than a gimmick.

I got a few packs in 1000d in different colours because they were described as durable and I can prepack them and know what I want for where I'm going as they are colour coded.

Exactly how long are these things expected to last? It was plenty durable for two trips. The bottom of it, where it would rest on the ground, has abrasions heading towards hole formation. I may have packed it with a pointy thing in that location and created a pressure point, but this is supposed to be super thick and durable.

Is this normal? What type of life expectancy should I expect from this type of gear?

Can I mush some super glue in to the abrasions to enhance it?

What's the story here?
Durable, not indestructible.

If you have packed a pointy bit downwards, then had that poke into the ground, then it's quite likely that it will eventually develop into a hole.

There is an element of personal care and thinking that is still required with kit.

As for fixing it? Dunno. If it were mi e I'd probably chuck some green cloth tape over it - or you could get a 1000d patch sewn over the new weak spot.
 
Correct, Bergan packing is the reverse of what sounds right, heavier stuff at the top so the weight is on your shoulders, if you have the heavy stuff low down the load pulls on your lower back.
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
Hi I was recommended military gear for durability for proper hikes. So I use Snugpak sleeping bags etc, if it can pass NSN muster it must be more than a gimmick.

I got a few packs in 1000d in different colours because they were described as durable and I can prepack them and know what I want for where I'm going as they are colour coded.

Exactly how long are these things expected to last? It was plenty durable for two trips. The bottom of it, where it would rest on the ground, has abrasions heading towards hole formation. I may have packed it with a pointy thing in that location and created a pressure point, but this is supposed to be super thick and durable.

Is this normal? What type of life expectancy should I expect from this type of gear?

Can I mush some super glue in to the abrasions to enhance it?

What's the story here?

Forget superglue.

For reference, I use super glue (which is the household term for Cyanoacrylate, commonly known as CA) a lot in my workshop. If you get super glue on fabric, it soaks into the fibres, and then sets hard, like plastic. The fibres can't deal with the stiffness and, where they would normally flex/bend/stretch/move they will in fact break, therefore making a crispy-outlined hole which will undoubtedly be worse than the small hole/tear/worn area you are trying to fix.
 
Hi I was recommended military gear for durability for proper hikes. So I use Snugpak sleeping bags etc, if it can pass NSN muster it must be more than a gimmick.

I got a few packs in 1000d in different colours because they were described as durable and I can prepack them and know what I want for where I'm going as they are colour coded.

Exactly how long are these things expected to last? It was plenty durable for two trips. The bottom of it, where it would rest on the ground, has abrasions heading towards hole formation. I may have packed it with a pointy thing in that location and created a pressure point, but this is supposed to be super thick and durable.

Is this normal? What type of life expectancy should I expect from this type of gear?

Can I mush some super glue in to the abrasions to enhance it?

What's the story here?

Check the labels.
The Snugpack, which you like, will say Made in UK ( Yorkshire actually ).

You didn't give the packs makes.
If their labels say Made in China - theres your answer.

But they were cheap were'n't they ?
 
Unless it was there when you bought it, it's either very, very cheap or you've damaged it (pointy item in the bottom (ooer!), dragged on rocks. ember from fire etc. Or was it secondhand?

Sew/stick a rounded-corner patch on. If it's a big hole, melt (carefully) the loose threads of the hole & patch inside & out. edit: Depending on size of hole, gaffa tape might do you, and most glues will work, not superglue, it doesn't flex. Even PVA can work. Test on an unobtrusive area.)

For proper hiking, proper hiking packs are nicer and as tough as you're likely to need. Exception for external frame packs if you start carrying deer carcasses or the like
 
People running around the plains and mountains in hot dry places are using kit made from 500D and it is lasting for a couple or three six month tours, so 1000D should last a good while.

Unless it was there when you bought it, it's either very, very cheap or you've damaged it (pointy item in the bottom (ooer!), dragged on rocks. ember from fire etc. Or was it secondhand?

Sew/stick a rounded-corner patch on. If it's a big hole, melt (carefully) the loose threads of the hole & patch inside & out. edit: Depending on size of hole, gaffa tape might do you, and most glues will work, not superglue, it doesn't flex. Even PVA can work. Test on an unobtrusive area.)

For proper hiking, proper hiking packs are nicer and as tough as you're likely to need. Exception for external frame packs if you start carrying deer carcasses or the like

I can't see PVA working, isn't it made for glueing paper together and for plasters to put on walls before the skim coat. What would do well is the same rounded corner patch you describe along with the contact cement/adhesive that shoe repair blokes use as that has flex.
 
Take it to a tent maker and get them to put a strip of ripstop canvas on the entire bottom side, also covering the hole. Should last you years.
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
The clue to repairing most things is to look how they were made in the first place, in this case, stitched. Open thread ends are most likely fused so this would be the most effective repair method.
Cut oversize patches for both interior & exterior, fuse all thread ends, also fuse the ends of the hole - enlarge slightly if necassary to get them all. Apply external patch with some silicone based adhesive (for flexibility and water repellency) apply internal patch if required and stitch the whole lot together with suitable rot-proof thread.
 
People running around the plains and mountains in hot dry places are using kit made from 500D and it is lasting for a couple or three six month tours, so 1000D should last a good while.



I can't see PVA working, isn't it made for glueing paper together and for plasters to put on walls before the skim coat. What would do well is the same rounded corner patch you describe along with the contact cement/adhesive that shoe repair blokes use as that has flex.

oh yeah, that's the stuff 'Shoegoo' (or seamsealer for tents?).
I've used PVA (wood glue rather than paper glue); it does work temporarily, small holes , flexible, can work it into fabric. Not for anything structural though, as would be expected.
 
I can't see PVA working, isn't it made for glueing paper together and for plasters to put on walls before the skim coat. What would do well is the same rounded corner patch you describe along with the contact cement/adhesive that shoe repair blokes use as that has flex.
PVA was made for gluing wooden joints. For example I fixed a broken neck on my acoustic guitar with PVA and clamps, and the join is now probably stronger than the wood around it.
9BBBF508-10D0-48EA-AC29-748415117B69.jpeg

(Obviously I cleaned off the excess when I’d finished)
 
oh yeah, that's the stuff 'Shoegoo' (or seamsealer for tents?).
I've used PVA (wood glue rather than paper glue); it does work temporarily, small holes , flexible, can work it into fabric. Not for anything structural though, as would be expected.

Thats it...."Shoegoo", couldn't remember the name of it earlier.
 

CC_TA

LE
Canvas repair tape either side of bit needing repairing / hole then stitch all over it.

Virtus bergans and daysacks will outlast any other equipment. (It's not the build quality it's the fact they are still in their wrappers stuffed in the cupboard never to be used.)
 
One thing that comes out from this discussion is that people will pay £ $€ 100s for a beautifully designed and built piece of kit.

They will use it for years, decades maybe - but they wont take it on Ops.
If you have paid loads of your money for something - you will treat it with kid gloves.

If you are sent into the crucible, you will maintain your kit as best you can.

If it gets fcuked - go get another from Stores
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
One thing that comes out from this discussion is that people will pay £ $€ 100s for a beautifully designed and built piece of kit.

They will use it for years, decades maybe - but they wont take it on Ops.
If you have paid loads of your money for something - you will treat it with kid gloves.

If you are sent into the crucible, you will maintain your kit as best you can.

If it gets fcuked - go get another from Stores
Ummm... a lot of the kit I used on ops was my own, not all expensive but fit for purpose. It outlasted some of the issue kit - maybe I looked after it more, maybe it was more hardwearing, I don't remember thinking of the cost, just ensuring all my kit was maintained to the best standard given the environment. Getting stuff replaced wasn't always an option when you're a (long) wokka ride away from the QM's Last op for me was eleven years ago so maybe there's a 'tactical QM's support' role which carries all the gucci kit to the front line for 'hot swaps' these days? ;)
 
the contact cement/adhesive that shoe repair blokes use
It's called Evo-stik. Nice smell. Quite addictive really.

It's a contact adhesive (apply to both surfaces and allow to dry before bringing the two surfaces together) and not really intended to flex a great deal. Fine for soles (which are quite stiff) but less suited to fabrics. While it will provide a quick, easy and effective temporary repair, it could prevent a subsequent permanent repair. Generally OK if used in conjunction with sewing to make a permanent repair, less so if the gluing and sewing are done separately.
 
Ummm... a lot of the kit I used on ops was my own, not all expensive but fit for purpose. It outlasted some of the issue kit - maybe I looked after it more, maybe it was more hardwearing, I don't remember thinking of the cost, just ensuring all my kit was maintained to the best standard given the environment. Getting stuff replaced wasn't always an option when you're a (long) wokka ride away from the QM's Last op for me was eleven years ago so maybe there's a 'tactical QM's support' role which carries all the gucci kit to the front line for 'hot swaps' these days? ;)

Hot swaps - unlikely.
As soon as practical it is your Platoon commanders job to find out how much kit has been used, lost , broken.
He will call the man at QM and amongst the order for ammunition, food, water, batteries there will be " and a new pair of Size 9s for Smiffy; a back pack for Jonesy"

A few quids worth of privately bought Molle pouch is not a problem - but trashing a £250 back pack would really piss you off.
 

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