P*ssed as a newt and similar drinking expressions.

Three sheets to the wind ....

Sailing obviously, but can't remember how it could be used as a simile.
[Wah-shield on]


On a yacht, at least... The mainsail (the big one in the middle) is controlled by a sheet (rope) attached to the boom (the bit that clonks your head shortly after the skipper starts loudly telling you that he’s about ready for something). The jib (flappy sail at the front) has two sheets (ropes) running from the clew (free corner) to port and starboard (I think you know these ones) to control it.

So, three sheets left to the wind to do what it wants, makes progress somewhat random. Even if there is an attempt to steer in the right direction.

.

Er... is there any rum left?
 
[Wah-shield on]


On a yacht, at least... The mainsail (the big one in the middle) is controlled by a sheet (rope) attached to the boom (the bit that clonks your head shortly after the skipper starts loudly telling you that he’s about ready for something). The jib (flappy sail at the front) has two sheets (ropes) running from the clew (free corner) to port and starboard (I think you know these ones) to control it.

So, three sheets left to the wind to do what it wants, makes progress somewhat random. Even if there is an attempt to steer in the right direction.

.

Er... is there any rum left?
Well, well. I'd always thought it was something to do with sailor's bedding after I'd been told that RN sailors were issued three sheets to be used in rotation - top sheet, bottom sheet and one in the wash. I'd assumed that the phrase resulted from a sailor lagging his hammock, necessitating all three sheets being hung out to dry.
 

NSP

LE
Things like, ' point Percy at the porcelain', ' hold hands with the wife's best friend.' 'off to break the seal'. 'off for a lag/jimmy/slash/run off.
Boaty types various have often been heard to say, "Just going to drain the bilge," in that context. One chief engineering, on standing up from our table in the pub, announced cheerily, "Right, then - time to line up valves to discharge ballast to sea," before waddling off towards the gents head.

On the after-effects:-

"Ugh. I've got a mouth like the bottom of a parrot's cage."

"Well, you had a cockatoo in it last night, you slag!"
 
[Wah-shield on]


On a yacht, at least... The mainsail (the big one in the middle) is controlled by a sheet (rope) attached to the boom (the bit that clonks your head shortly after the skipper starts loudly telling you that he’s about ready for something). The jib (flappy sail at the front) has two sheets (ropes) running from the clew (free corner) to port and starboard (I think you know these ones) to control it.

So, three sheets left to the wind to do what it wants, makes progress somewhat random. Even if there is an attempt to steer in the right direction.

.

Er... is there any rum left?
Thanks Trig...:)


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driverRE

Clanker
One I like which I heard over here in Oz is "Got the wobbly boots on".
 
Terms I've heard and used:

Sloshed

Drunker than two barrels of shit

He was all fucky-toed, like a blind horse in a melon patch
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
There must be a wealth of drink related rhyming slang, such as:

Brahms & Liszt
Going for a pint of pigs ear down the old battle cruiser

Over to you ...
Forsyth Saga - Lager
Laugh & Titter - Bitter
 
There must be a wealth of drink related rhyming slang, such as:

Brahms & Liszt
Going for a pint of pigs ear down the old battle cruiser

Over to you ...
Point of order Sister Bob.

Cockerney Riming Slang doesn't use the second word and often truncates the first word despite the second word always being the rhyme. You wouldn't call some of our wilder posters a Berkeley Hunt (although they might well deserve the appelation).

It is more likely a Cockerney (certainly one from the ancient Lost Tribe) would say "lets 'ave a pig dahn the battle". It's even more likely they would mix backslang with rhyming slang and say "lets 'ave a reeb dahn the battle". This would make it even more indecipherable to a copper listening in.

Although, oddly enough, Brahms and Liszt is often used in full.

Maybe we should rename this site Khyberr. Or possibly Botttle.
 
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It's even more likely they would mix backslang with rhyming slang and say "lets 'ave a reeb dahn the battle". This would make it even more indecipherable to a copper listening in.
Wouldn't that require said Cockneys to have a spelling ability? They can't pronounce "thing" so spelling would stand no chance.
 
'Tired and emotional' - a euphamism coined by Private Eye in a spoof diplomatic despatch to describe the Labour Cabinet Minister George Brown. Fairly well know phrase nowadays and often used by Private Ey
I used tired and confused. ;)
 
One of my favourites:

‘He’s in drink’ (said with an Irish accent)

Or for the RMP out there.

‘His speech was slurred, his eyes were glazed and he was un steady on his feet. He was drunk’
You forgot his breath smelt strongly of alcoholic liquor. The correct phrase was his gait was unsteady. ;)
 
'Tired and emotional' - a euphamism coined by Private Eye in a spoof diplomatic despatch to describe the Labour Cabinet Minister George Brown. Fairly well know phrase nowadays and often used by Private Ey
'Overwrought as a newt'!

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Wouldn't that require said Cockneys to have a spelling ability? They can't pronounce "thing" so spelling would stand no chance.
To be fair, by the time rhyming slang and backslang were introduced most Cockerneez would have had elementary education.

So they would be able to both reverse words in backslang and slightly change the word if it was not easily pronounced backwards (i.e trousers becoming reswort). Some backslang has passed into common usage - yob is probably the best (maybe only) example I can think of.

What they could do was read but not necessarily pronounce correctly. So Berkeley Hunt becomes berk rather than bark because they had never heard it pronounced properly, maybe through not being too familiar with west country foxhunting..
 
What they could do was read but not necessarily pronounce correctly. So Berkeley Hunt becomes berk rather than bark because they had never heard it pronounced properly, maybe through not being too familiar with west country foxhunting..
I always thought berk was derived from Berkshire Hunt. Not that it makes any difference as the contracted version would be identical.
 

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