Oxbridge Entry For Underprivileged

#1
Amid all the gloom and depressing news from around the world I found this ray of light.

School achieves highest entry to Oxbridge

For so many schools these days an education appears to be anything but literacy and numeracy, however, this school, in a poorer area of London, is achieving results out of all proportion to its size and demographic but applying some specialist skills and reinforcing the message to their students that they can achieve. They are to be congratulated.
 
#2
Good on them!
 
#3
The cynic in me notes that while the school may be in a "deprived" borough, the pupils, having travelled for up to two hours to attend, probably aren't.

Add in the selection process and it begins to look as though it's the cream of Greater London non-public scholars that get a place.

And 5 Oxbridge graduates to help them get Oxbridge places? And where is the funding coming from to pay the salaries of these (apparently) non-teaching staff? Surely such august institutions aren't cooking the books to get a PC tick in the box.

It also seems that "ethnic minority" equates to "disadvantaged". How many pupils are the children of disadvantaged doctors and lawyers? That would explain how they're able to meet the travel costs that would be beyond the means of the truly poor families.

Well done to the token kid that managed to beat the odds though.
 
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#4
The cynic in me notes that while the school may be in a "deprived" borough, the pupils, having travelled for up to two hours to attend, probably aren't.
I went to a school like that. It was a brand new school with state of the art facilities. Teachers were queueing up to work there so management could pick and choose the best, including some who came from public (i.e. private) schools.

A bloke in the year above me went to Oxford which was unheard of for state school pupils in Scotland. In fact, it's still the case that there are more Chinese students than Scottish students at Oxford.

I had a look at the place a while ago. Hardly anybody goes to university now from my old school, let alone Oxbridge. There's a police station with a permanent police presence inside the school. They do have an LGBT Bronze Charter though and this seems to involve teachers who enjoy discussing their sex lives with children.

Add in the selection process and it begins to look as though it's the cream of Greater London non-public scholars that get a place.
Isn't that to be expected? Oxford and Cambridge are globally elite universities. They only accept people who are academically gifted and, err, members of the Royal Family with a B and a C at A-level.

And 5 Oxbridge graduates to help them get Oxbridge places? And where is the funding coming from to pay the salaries of these (apparently) non-teaching staff? Surely such august institutions aren't cooking the books to get a PC tick in the box.
Funding probably comes out of the same pot used to pay for "teachers" who are full time union reps. My nephew had to give up Spanish half way through his course because one of the Spanish teachers was giving up teaching to become a full time unionista with her own office in the school and, somehow, still drawing a teacher's salary. I believe she even managed to get promoted to some sort of senior teacher while not teaching.

It also seems that "ethnic minority" equates to "disadvantaged". How many pupils are the children of disadvantaged doctors and lawyers? That would explain how they're able to meet the travel costs that would be beyond the means of the truly poor families.
School kids get free bus travel in London.
 
#8
It also seems that "ethnic minority" equates to "disadvantaged". How many pupils are the children of disadvantaged doctors and lawyers? That would explain how they're able to meet the travel costs that would be beyond the means of the truly poor families.
If you really want to know look up the ofsted report and see how many are on free school meals.

edited to add info from the 2011 ofsted

Brampton Manor became an academy-converter school in April 2011. It is a larger than average school serving a culturally diverse community. Half the academy’s population are known to eligible for free school meals and over 80% of students are from minority ethnic groups. Over twothirds of students speak English as an additional language. Over three times the number of students compared to the national average has special educational needs, with over 12% having a statement of special educational need or supported by school action plus. The July 2010 interim assessment carried out by Ofsted identified that the academy’s strong performance had been sustained. The purpose-built sixth form that will accommodate approximately 400 students will open in September 2012. The academy exceeds the government's 2011 floor standard, which sets the minimum expectations for students' attainment
 
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#9
Grammar school in all but name?
 
#10
If you really want to know look up the ofsted report and see how many are on free school meals.

edited to add info from the 2011 ofsted
The report is from the year before it became a 6th Form, 3 years before it got it's first (sole of that year) Oxbridge offer.

Do you think it still has 12% SEN when 100% of the pupils progress to university?

"Entry Requirements

Our Sixth Form is heavily over-subscribed. Selection is based on academic achievement, with students required to meet all of the following criteria:

At least a grade 7 at GCSE in all subjects they intend to study at A Level.

A grade point average of at least 7.0 across all GCSEs studied (minimum entry criteria a grade point average of 6.5).

A minimum of a grade 5 in English Language and Mathematics, regardless of the subjects studied at A Level.

Please note that the above represent theminimum entry criteria. Where courses are oversubscribed the best grades will prevail and significantly higher grades may be required in order to secure a place."
 
#11
@putteesinmyhands As I was going out I did not expand on the clip from the ofsted report which was outstanding. This means that the next a future ones will be light touch until standards drop. You will also see that the 2011 one gave the pupils at 1400 or so and the latest one they have a capacity of 2k but an actual strength of 2.2k. Which for a college is normal as not all student will be in at all times. Many SEN go on to uni and it is understanding what SEN means. Just because a student is funded under SEN (a good income stream for primary schools which follows the student to the next school) it does not mean they are stupid, it could also mean autism, requiring information in different ways, blind, hearing, or dyslexia.

The free school meals is a good indicator of the income levels of the community and also opens extra funding.

Your claim that 100% go on to uni is not shown in the schools own info;

  • Destinations (percentage of students who continue in education or training or move on to employment in the year after the end of key stage 4): 93% (Newham: 86%; England: 88%
Not all students completing year 11 will move onto the sixth form as the courses they offer look to be more classroom based academic than others colleges who teach more practical how to bang nails into wood. As to the entry criteria I take it you have not had a child move onto an A level course as all A level courses have an entry requirement, infact all courses have an entry requirement. The course I ran had a very low level entry at GCSE D but we were running an NCFE course, my colleague was running a BTEC and needed Cs and Bs or the students couldn't handle the workload.
 
#12
My lad was encouraged to apply to Oxbridge next year. He did his research and opted for Durham instead. Those from an underprivileged background are not treated as equals by the majority of students and staff at Oxbridge.
 
#13
@putteesinmyhands As I was going out I did not expand on the clip from the ofsted report which was outstanding. This means that the next a future ones will be light touch until standards drop. You will also see that the 2011 one gave the pupils at 1400 or so and the latest one they have a capacity of 2k but an actual strength of 2.2k. Which for a college is normal as not all student will be in at all times. Many SEN go on to uni and it is understanding what SEN means. Just because a student is funded under SEN (a good income stream for primary schools which follows the student to the next school) it does not mean they are stupid, it could also mean autism, requiring information in different ways, blind, hearing, or dyslexia.

The free school meals is a good indicator of the income levels of the community and also opens extra funding.

Your claim that 100% go on to uni is not shown in the schools own info;


Not all students completing year 11 will move onto the sixth form as the courses they offer look to be more classroom based academic than others colleges who teach more practical how to bang nails into wood. As to the entry criteria I take it you have not had a child move onto an A level course as all A level courses have an entry requirement, infact all courses have an entry requirement. The course I ran had a very low level entry at GCSE D but we were running an NCFE course, my colleague was running a BTEC and needed Cs and Bs or the students couldn't handle the workload.
"Sam Dobin, the director of sixth form at Brampton Manor, said: “Every student here goes to university. We have a very traditional approach with no gimmicks or shortcuts.""
From the link in the original post.

This school is now a 6th Form College - only.

The story gave the impression that Brompton Manor is doing amazing things with local kids in its deprived catchment area when the reality seems to be that its pupils, creamed from a catchment area of more than 100 square miles, would be capable of achieving Oxbridge entry without attending this particular school. This school does, however, seem to have a means of introducing pupils (via the Oxbridge graduates) to the Old Boys' Network to secure an unfair advantage in the Oxbridge selection process.
 
#14
My lad was encouraged to apply to Oxbridge next year. He did his research and opted for Durham instead. Those from an underprivileged background are not treated as equals by the majority of students and staff at Oxbridge.
Not quite the experience of my daughter, academic ability is lauded with little regard to background. Fellow students really didn't care where others were educated and often it was those from "underprivileged" backgrounds who made a point about it, and were not willing to take people for who they were rather than their background.

Staff were either completely neutral in their treatment of students or favoured marginally those from "underprivileged" backgrounds, do you think that my daughters Director of Studies who was a local Labour councillor and displayed his political views overtly would favour those from public schools?
 

Caecilius

LE
Kit Reviewer
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#15
Those from an underprivileged background are not treated as equals by the majority of students and staff at Oxbridge.
This is simply untrue. Some students may treat people from different backgrounds differently but that's just life and not an Oxbridge-specific problem. I'd argue it's worse at Durham because the public schoolboys tend to be focussed in specific colleges (Hatfield particularly) while at Oxbridge academic merit conquers all.
 
#16
My daughter just got an offer to read Economics at Oxford. She goes to a normal comprehensive school. The offer was pretty reasonable too, A*AA. I would have thought they could ask for A* across the board, given the competition for places.

Maybe having interviewed the candidates and seen their entrance results, they want to ensure there's no last minute slip-ups to get their selectees in the door.
 
#17
My daughter just got an offer to read Economics at Oxford. She goes to a normal comprehensive school. The offer was pretty reasonable too, A*AA. I would have thought they could ask for A* across the board, given the competition for places.
It's going back yonks but... ...a lad in my class received an offer of 2 Es from Oxford. He was an absolute whiz at Maths and talked the right talk in the interview. The reason for such a low offer was that they wanted him and didn't want to put him under pressure in his A level exams.
 

Caecilius

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#19
It's going back yonks but... ...a lad in my class received an offer of 2 Es from Oxford. He was an absolute whiz at Maths and talked the right talk in the interview. The reason for such a low offer was that they wanted him and didn't want to put him under pressure in his A level exams.
My cousin got the same from Cambridge in the early 2000s. I think they've pretty much stopped the practice now.
 
#20
There really are some miserable bastards on here. They moan about the privileges of public schools and when those schools reach out and help state schools they whine that it's just charity.
 

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