Out of date FFD's

First Field Dressings have the use by date on them that after which they are no longer "sterile."

How much does this really matter? Not for a Range First Aid Bag or on ops or anything that is "official" but chucking some old ones in the boot of your car with the wee first aid kit. Surly something like that is miles better then using your snotty scarf or muddy jumper if you happen on an RTA or what ever.

Is it different cases for the old brown ones vs the new Israeli ones?
 
You answered your own question.

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spaz

LE
I carry a full paramedic trauma kit plus defibrillator in the boot of my car and drive round looking for RTAs to assist at. If I can't find any I sometimes swerve at people or randomly slam my brakes on to try and speed things up a bit.

Just getting in before chocolate_log makes a similar statement.
 
I've got old and new type stashed in the boot of my car. Hopefully I'll never need them but if I was ever pissing arterial blood the 'best before' date will be the last thing on my mind. You could stuff your nutella coated crackers in the wound and I'd still be grateful.
 
I carry a full paramedic trauma kit plus defibrillator in the boot of my car and drive round looking for RTAs to assist at. If I can't find any I sometimes swerve at people or randomly slam my brakes on to try and speed things up a bit.

Just getting in before chocolate_log makes a similar statement.
Your my Hero spaz! :number1:
 

spaz

LE
You could stuff your nutella coated crackers in the wound and I'd still be grateful.
Does the offer still stand for my angry rod? If so I can be found on the Tesco roundabout in Aldershot most evenings. I like to get a few hundred laps in just in case.
 
I had a medic tell me recently that under no circumstances would she use one of the old FFDs because "they just soak up blood". She'd apply pressure manually instead.

Quite how she would manage to do anything else at the same time such as "get some help" etc wasn't forthcoming.

God help anybody she comes across with a bleeding head injury.....
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
I'd be wary just in case God is watching, otherwise crack on.


Posted from the ARRSE Mobile app (iOS or Android)
 
I like nutella brownies.
 
I had a medic tell me recently that under no circumstances would she use one of the old FFDs because "they just soak up blood". She'd apply pressure manually instead.

Quite how she would manage to do anything else at the same time such as "get some help" etc wasn't forthcoming.

God help anybody she comes across with a bleeding head injury.....

Oddly enough, we seemed to manage with the old design for .... ooh .... 80+ years? I appreciate where she is coming from but lets face it, if the wound is bleeding badly enough to fill the feckers up with blood, then I'm guessing you'd need a wee bit of pressure as well. Unless Spaz had hit you in his car because you'd be dead from his revved up defibrillator / nutella cracker action.
 
C

cloudbuster

Guest
I had a medic tell me recently that under no circumstances would she use one of the old FFDs because "they just soak up blood".
Help me out here, lads; I've been OOL for a while, but isn't that the general idea? What does she think tampons do, apart from enabling a doris to go hang-gliding and swimming with sharks and stuff?
 

Bravo_Bravo

On ROPS
On ROPs
Does the offer still stand for my angry rod?
Obviously, as long as the gaping wound is no wider than 3mm.

Or attached to a grandma in Yorkshire.
 
Oddly enough, we seemed to manage with the old design for .... ooh .... 80+ years? I appreciate where she is coming from but lets face it, if the wound is bleeding badly enough to fill the feckers up with blood, then I'm guessing you'd need a wee bit of pressure as well. Unless Spaz had hit you in his car because you'd be dead from his revved up defibrillator / nutella cracker action.

Well as you say, I get the idea about compression but that's why it was taught that you bind the thing on tightly if necessary. Still better than improvising in my opinion. For non catastrophic bleeding I think it would be just as good if not possibly better. Scalp wounds for instance bleed very profusely but slowly. There's no real way to apply pressure effectively. It's a case of holding it in place until it clots, otherwise the cas has got blood pouring down his fizzog. I've treated (significant) wounds of this nature on two occasions and applying pressure wouldn't have helped.
 
T

Tinman74

Guest
I carry a full paramedic trauma kit plus defibrillator in the boot of my car and drive round looking for RTAs to assist at. If I can't find any I sometimes swerve at people or randomly slam my brakes on to try and speed things up a bit.

Just getting in before chocolate_log makes a similar statement.
That's because you have been castrated you numb ****.


Just saying.


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ACAB

LE
The first FFD I was issued in 1976 as a Junior Leader was dated 1942. So had seen more action than most of the ******* who post on here nowadays.
 
T

Tinman74

Guest
You're hardly qualified to comment on road side first aid. You killed the last poor ******.
You have too be in it to loose it, have a go, it's sweet.

You have to agree, cracking ribs whilst performing chest compressions on a waxy looking piece of meat, looks super awesome.

Posted from the ARRSE Mobile app (iOS or Android)
 
The first FFD I was issued in 1976 as a Junior Leader was dated 1942. So had seen more action than most of the ******* who post on here nowadays.
Same here--1942---must have been a warehouse full of them somewhere.
 
I remember, in the distant past when I was a yoof doing a padbrats interest week, a hardened, steely-eyed medic demonstrated a technique with FFD's. With a particularly bleedy wound you burned one FFD, preferred method was in a mess tin, creating a pile of sterile ash. Apply ash to bleedy hole, tightly apply second FFD over the now ash filled bleedy hole. The idea was that the ash acts as a DIY sterile clotting agent.

It made sense to me, still does, but I have never,ever, seen it demo'ed any other time........the medic impressed all the 15 and 16 year old padbrats by telling us it was a THEM technique. He also showed us how to do a trach using a clasp knife and biro, honestly......is it any wonder I became a stacker.
 

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