"Our War" BBC3 Raw Helmet Cam Footage

#1
Our War

Our War online showcases a unique range of over 35 exclusive self-shot films, exploring the different ways in which a decade of conflict in Afghanistan has affected young people.

Many of the videos have been shot by young people, from their perspectives, in their own words.Whether it's young soldiers fighting on the frontline, the families of serving troops back home, or Afghans living in a war torn country.

These shorts explore what it means and feels like to be affected by the Afghanistan war in your youth. Our War online also aims to provide the inside track on the Taliban and Afghanistan, using animation and archive, to delve into almost 200 years of British involvement in the region.
Saw this on the BBC News website (BBC News - Life at war captured through the eyes of soldiers) where the article generally discussed the idea that such raw footage was mostly unavailable to anybody but the soldiers who filmed it. Seemingly the documentary is 'unvarnished' and shows the reality of life in Afghanistan, not just for young soldiers but for older veterans and experienced seniors as well as families back home.

It'll first be shown on the 7th of June.
 
#4
I honestly didn't realise that you'd been on Herrick, Fally, I'd always pegged you as one of the much older crowd.

No offense and all that - please don't rip my anus out with a racing spoon.
 
#6
There was loads of footage taken from H4. I remember OC A Coy, 3 PARA saying "put the ******* cameras down, and get some rounds down the range!"
Haha, I've always been very surprised that filming is allowed, I'd imagine such things would be very strictly banned. Pissing around on operations is generally a no-no and I imagine fannying about to strap a camera to your helmet can be quite time consuming and a bit of a daft looking concept. Yet on the BBC preview it's quite clearly a Plt Sgt looking for the casualty. It seems like the idea was really popular even for seniors over there.
 
#12
I was interviewed for this programme and gave some video footage. Hopefully it'll show what the realities for the troops on the ground doing the fighting are really like.
You'll never really be able to show that in a video, book or interview. The vast majority of people have never been in a comparable situation, and simply can't relate.

You can tell someone that a tour is 6 months long, but 6 months doesn't seem all that long until you're 5 months in. You can tell someone that the troops haven't slept for 3 days, but very few civvies have ever gone that long without sleep. You can tell show a clip of the troops route clearing, but very few civvies know what it's like to inch forward waiting for a bang.
 
Z

Zarathustra

Guest
#14
You'll never really be able to show that in a video, book or interview. The vast majority of people have never been in a comparable situation, and simply can't relate.

You can tell someone that a tour is 6 months long, but 6 months doesn't seem all that long until you're 5 months in. You can tell someone that the troops haven't slept for 3 days, but very few civvies have ever gone that long without sleep. You can tell show a clip of the troops route clearing, but very few civvies know what it's like to inch forward waiting for a bang.
I gave up trying to explain this to my family and friends long ago, even the REMFs I currently work with can't grasp what soldiers on the front line living out of WMIKs or PBs have to endure over a 7 month deployment.
 
#15
I gave up trying to explain this to my family and friends long ago, even the REMFs I currently work with can't grasp what soldiers on the front line living out of WMIKs or PBs have to endure over a 7 month deployment.
Yep. Most soldiers haven't a clue what it's like to be in close contact with the enemy to be honest.
 
Z

Zarathustra

Guest
#16
Yep. Most soldiers haven't a clue what it's like to be in close contact with the enemy to be honest.
So true, in Bn it's not too bad as most people have walked the walk, but where I currently work there are only 4 people who been there and done it out of nearly 90 odd.
 
#19
I suppose I can give you the point of view from a civvy aspect, for those of you who have seen it. Not long ago the 'What Would You Do' adverts were on the telly, you know the ones, the Start Thinking Soldier types that were filmed with a helmet cam and showed everything from a troop delivering aid to a convoy coming across an unattended vehicle? Those adverts were fantastic in my opinion because they gave you this 'first person' concept of what the situation was like.

What the adverts don't mention is how tired you are, how heavy the kit you're wearing is, how tense the situation is and generally how much fear I imagine that you'd have to suppress. That side is incredibly difficult to convey. I've tried to read the books and watch the documentaries but it never really helps you to understand. I have been pissed off, wet and tired wandering around the British countryside in complete safety on the odd occasion. Double that up with extreme heat, a shitty landscape and the stress of people trying to kill you and you've got a different scenario altogether. One that I just cannae really imagine for myself.

Watch the BBC link. The preview they have is by far the best message for the fear and confusion involved if not the sleeplessness and the endurance required, it's the Anglians. A platoon sergeant is rushing forward from the very back of the squad shouting to find out where the casualty is. He's moving right up along the line and there's this since of urgency and fear there in his voice. So if this program can AT LEAST express that, it's a good thing, right?
 
#20
The cap badge doesn't mean a thing! Fally will probably back me up on this, on H4, 90% of the battle group engaged in combat.
I am obviously a REMF cap badge but was Inf Kandak on OMLT, attached to A Coy! I spent 6 months of pure lick out!.. I'm AAC!
 

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