Our IT companies may relocate to other European countries, India warns UK

#1
Our IT companies may relocate to other European countries, India warns UK - The Times of India

LONDON: India today warned the UK that its IT majors may relocate their business to other European countries, if the British government insists on tough visa rules which affect Indian IT professionals.

The issue came up for discussion during meeting of commerce and industry minister
Anand Sharma
with UK secretary of state for business, innovation and skills
Vince Cable
and the chancellor of the exchequer
George Osborne
.

However, Osborne assured Sharma that the British government has decided not to make any change in the 'intra-company transfers' for the next two years. The proposal had upset the Indian IT industry and the government as it meant that the professionals on intra company transfers to UK would be treated "prospective immigrants".

Sharma said this rule has badly affected the performance of Indian companies operating in the UK.
:cry:

"Sharma also expressed concern that this move may force Indian companies, especially IT companies to relocate to other European capital," an official statement said.

The minister also raised the issue of the restrictions imposed on non-EU immigration into Britain which is adversely affecting the operations of Indian companies here.

"He specifically referred to the
UK border agency
treating
intra-company transfers
of IT experts, professionals and highly skilled workers as prospective immigrants which has affected has badly affected the performance of Indian companies operating in the UK," it said.
:nod:

Besides, Sharma also expressed concern over the issue that Indian companies who want to acquire UK firms have been facing considerable delay and long legal hassles.

"He highlighted the concerns of Indian companies who want to visit UK for business meetings and also the long delay in obtaining visa by Indian nationals," it said. He said Indian experts coming to the UK leave the country after completion of their contractual obligations with their employers in the UK and "therefore they cannot be treated as economic migrants".

Highlighting the vast contributions of Indian professionals to the UK economy, Sharma said that stoppage of post -study work permits to students has not found favourable to Indian students who are not able to recover the cost of their education in the UK universities and therefore they are now looking for options to study in other countries.

"He stressed that this development is expected to impact the UK universities where at present over 40,000 Indians students have been studying," it added.

Sharma was here for the 8th round of India-UK Joint Economic and Trade Committee (
JETCO
) meeting.
Bit of an old news. So what do you guys think?
 
#2
O dear, how sad. Never mind.

Methinks this is a reaction to the clamping down on bogus colleges and IT firms. HSBC and L/rover Jag don't seem to have problems.
 
#3
O dear, how sad. Never mind.

Methinks this is a reaction to the clamping down on bogus colleges and IT firms. HSBC and L/rover Jag don't seem to have problems.
Actually it was a reaction for the new visa rules which make the life of Indian IT professionals in UK miserable. Lets see what unfolds:nod:
 
#4
Tata are shite anyway. No loss if they disappear. But all the Europeans (Capgemini etc) and Yanks (CSC, HP, Accenture etc) are at it too.

If this stops the constant offshoring of UK IT jobs to India all well and good. It's outrageous how much money is getting pumped out of this country - most of it UK Government money. All of it money that is leaving the economy forever, most to France or the US as profit , the rest to Chennai & Pune unti lthey get too expensive just like Hungary and Egypt did.
 
#5
Tata are shite anyway. No loss if they disappear. But all the Europeans (Capgemini etc) and Yanks (CSC, HP, Accenture etc) are at it too.

If this stops the constant offshoring of UK IT jobs to India all well and good. It's outrageous how much money is getting pumped out of this country - most of it UK Government money. All of it money that is leaving the economy forever, most to France or the US as profit , the rest to Chennai & Pune unti lthey get too expensive just like Hungary and Egypt did.

Mate, i suggest you to broaden your mind and look beyond the protectionist mindset. What about the stuff UK exports? Can the Importing countries ban it too, for protecting their local goods? Tit for Tat? If UK does not respect free trade and thinks about banning imports(here Services) then what will happen if the other countries don't import your stuff?
 
#6
Tata are shite anyway. No loss if they disappear. But all the Europeans (Capgemini etc) and Yanks (CSC, HP, Accenture etc) are at it too.

If this stops the constant offshoring of UK IT jobs to India all well and good. It's outrageous how much money is getting pumped out of this country - most of it UK Government money. All of it money that is leaving the economy forever, most to France or the US as profit , the rest to Chennai & Pune unti lthey get too expensive just like Hungary and Egypt did.
Hmm. Interesting view on a completely different issue to the one the OP raised.

Back to topic. The government is between a rock and a hard place on the visa issue. They can't put in place immigration controls that will satisfy Daily Mail readers without upsetting the employers of mobile specialist staff, and they cant get the FDI they need for the economy with the immigration controls they promised a segment of the population to secure their vote. It'll probably end in tears....
 
#7
A complete non-story; Indian students are hardly big players in the Universities sector - the Chinese have got that one sewn up quite nicely. Indian students are prolific in FE colleges and colleges of dubious merit e.g. the UK College of Excellence, undertaking non-challenging studies alongside their real intention in coming to the UK to work in McDonalds and or Tescos. The post-study work visa was wide-open to abuse. Oh, and Indian IT workers (I hesitate to use the term 'professionals' because many IMHO are absolute crap) are not business visitors - they are renumerated and therefore require work visas in order to undertake employment (gainful or otherwise) in the UK. So no, I don't feel sorry for either Indian students or Indian IT workers. Next question please.
 
#8
Mate, i suggest you to broaden your mind and look beyond the protectionist mindset. What about the stuff UK exports? Can the Importing countries ban it too, for protecting their local goods? Tit for Tat? If UK does not respect free trade and thinks about banning imports(here Services) then what will happen if the other countries don't import your stuff?
Might I suggest you look at protectionist measures embedded in the Indian economy. India is no friend to free trade.
 
#9
Until they can write code that doesn't need extensive remediation by European and US developers they won't be too missed. Cheap and quality they don't do.
 
B

Biscuits_AB

Guest
#10
A complete non-story; Indian students are hardly big players in the Universities sector - the Chinese have got that one sewn up quite nicely. Indian students are prolific in FE colleges and colleges of dubious merit e.g. the UK College of Excellence, undertaking non-challenging studies alongside their real intention in coming to the UK to work in McDonalds and or Tescos. The post-study work visa was wide-open to abuse. Oh, and Indian IT workers (I hesitate to use the term 'professionals' because many IMHO are absolute crap) are not business visitors - they are renumerated and therefore require work visas in order to undertake employment (gainful or otherwise) in the UK. So no, I don't feel sorry for either Indian students or Indian IT workers. Next question please.
Indian IT workers....10 a penny.
 
#11
It might be no bad thing, I contracted to a company that were a locally based, wholly owned subsidiary of an Indian concern. IT field.

2/3 of the employees at every level were Asian, of the full-time permanent employees (most were temp), HR was the only department which was not 100% Asian staffed.

You could see through it in a lot of mainland cities (maybe) but the ethnic population of Belfast is comparatively very small, so it's definitely a company policy.

Mind you, you had Bsc level grads working working for minimum wage plus a quid an hour on unsociable shifts for a company with a puritanical attitude on matters like dress and conduct.... Not sure locals would do it.
 
#12
Heard some horror stories about india and IT workers taking te piss re visas paying TAX etc.
Although somebody who'd been sacked and replaced by indians was rehired as a contractor to sort the mess they'd made out at
A silly rates and took his own sweet time to solve the probems karmas a bitch :)
 
#13
Heard some horror stories about india and IT workers taking te piss re visas paying TAX etc.
Although somebody who'd been sacked and replaced by indians was rehired as a contractor to sort the mess they'd made out at
A silly rates and took his own sweet time to solve the probems karmas a bitch :)
I was hired, as opposed to rehired but the rest... Yep, pretty much.
 
#14
Does this mean the call centres will have English speakers ?
 
#15
If this stops the constant offshoring of UK IT jobs to India all well and good. It's outrageous how much money is getting pumped out of this country - most of it UK Government money. All of it money that is leaving the economy forever, most to France or the US as profit , the rest to Chennai & Pune unti lthey get too expensive just like Hungary and Egypt did.
I think the whole point is that they're not 'UK jobs'. They belong to the employer, not the nation and it's entirely up to them what they do with them.

We all of us buy into the liberal-economic theory of free trade every time we make a purchase. We can hardly turn round after proselytising it abroad for centuries and go, "Oh, hang on a minute" just because everybody else is learning how to play the game too.
 
#16
Might I suggest you look at protectionist measures embedded in the Indian economy. India is no friend to free trade.

India is loosening up while the UK seems to be tightening itself. As i said, if UK does some thing provocative , India will do something in retaliation. Newton's third law.

At the end of the day, it is all numbers game:nod:
 
#17
A complete non-story; Indian students are hardly big players in the Universities sector - the Chinese have got that one sewn up quite nicely.
They're the second largest nationality of overseas student in the UK.

Indian students are prolific in FE colleges and colleges of dubious merit e.g. the UK College of Excellence, undertaking non-challenging studies alongside their real intention in coming to the UK to work in McDonalds and or Tescos.
True, but that's a factor of numbers rather than quality. We've got our fair share of muppets indulging in HE or FE as have the Indians. They've also got a hell of a lot of good students coming here - a lot fewer than before PBS though.

My take on it, as someone involved with international students on a daily basis, is that the UKBA won't stop abuse of the visa system until they get their act together and police it better. Foisting the policing onto the very institutions with a vested financial interest in recruiting them proved a bloody awful idea since it relies on the academic integrity of the institution. Having spent 20-30 years removing attacking that integrity within education and trying to replace it with a dependence on making money from non-government sources had consequences that really shouldn't have been that hard to predict.

The post-study work visa was wide-open to abuse. Oh, and Indian IT workers (I hesitate to use the term 'professionals' because many IMHO are absolute crap) are not business visitors - they are renumerated and therefore require work visas in order to undertake employment (gainful or otherwise) in the UK. So no, I don't feel sorry for either Indian students or Indian IT workers. Next question please.
Again, down to policing of the system but PSW was brought in specifically at the behest of the business community. They'd seen the benefits of the 'Fresh Talent Initiative' north of the border and wanted a piece of the pie.

As to the quality of Indian students, my own purely anecdotal experience is that the good ones are extremely good indeed but the average distinctly pedestrian. Their government hasn't really got a grip of the expanding education system and their attempt to bring in private partners has had distinctly mixed results. I've attended a 'lab session' in a university quite famous for its biotechnology programmes where the students put on white coats to sit in a lecture theatre taking notes while the lecturer demonstrated the experiment. On the other hand, I can think of quite a few MSc Distinctions in the same field that have gone from my own place to the subcontinent.
 
#18
Seriously, is this something to worry about?
 
#19
Seriously, is this something to worry about?
We live in a world where talent is highly-mobile and business extremely promiscuous. Think of this as a test-case for our response to that fact of life.

It'll be something to worry about if we're not able to find a way to adapt successfully: I for one don't fancy a standard of living comparable to a 14th Century peasant, which is about all we could manage from our own resources.
 
#20
We live in a world where talent is highly-mobile and business extremely promiscuous. Think of this as a test-case for our response to that fact of life.

It'll be something to worry about if we're not able to find a way to adapt successfully: I for one don't fancy a standard of living comparable to a 14th Century peasant, which is about all we could manage from our own resources.
Doubt we could manage that without shedding a couple of tens of millions population.
 

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