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Our first Press Release

#2
I think this government has to save money following the reckless, indiscriminate, irresponsible, dogma driven madness of the Blair-Brown-Balls Terror. That is what I think.
 
#3
Please tell us what you think.

I see the Police are going for a Judicial Review regarding there pensions change from RPI to CPI.


Press Release 1

http://jlrrac.org/gallery/albums/userpics/Press_Release.pdf
I think thats exactly the kind of thing that will piss civvies off. Telling them they should pay more tax to pay for RPI on military pensions.
Where did you get some of those facts from?
The most relevant point to note is that a service career often comes to an end after 22 years
at the age of 40. Getting on the housing ladder then becomes an option that is taken much
later in life for Armed Forces personnel rather than those in civilian life. This is one of the
main reasons why it is so important to align service pensions with the RPI.
Soldiers normally have an advantage over the majority of civvies in that they can buy a house and rent it out because the MOD will also give them subsidized housing. If anything its a perk that well out of reach of most civilians.
 
#4
Agree....but why hit the military pensioner...why not hit the bankers and some of the others who caused the problems.

We worked hard for our pension then they degrade it as soon as we get out. They are only doing it to use because we are toothless to fight back.
 
#5
Yes that might be true now and in the last ten years...but not when I was serving.
I think thats exactly the kind of thing that will piss civvies off. Telling them they should pay more tax to pay for RPI on military pensions.
Where did you get some of those facts from?


Soldiers normally have an advantage over the majority of civvies in that they can buy a house and rent it out because the MOD will also give them subsidized housing. If anything its a perk that well out of reach of most civilians.
 
#6
I admire your determination but you are pissing up a rope. For years the Treasury have wanted to rein in military pensions: it is, for all intents and purposes, non-contributory, generous in the extreme and indexed linked. They hate it and always have.

The Police can bleat and moan as much as they like and, I suspect, the judicial review will fail.
 
#7
Yes that might be true now and in the last ten years...but not when I was serving.
From what I remember a great deal of squaddies left the army and use to buy their house outright with their lump sum because they got the council discount.
So that statement I quoted wasn't true back then just as it isnt true now.
 
#8
So...I left the army with a lump sum of £30k and bought a house outright... Errrrr sorry not many houses about at that price.

Even a Council House...... and you have to be living in a Council House before you can buy it anyway there are none.


From what I remember a great deal of squaddies left the army and use to buy their house outright with their lump sum because they got the council discount.
So that statement I quoted wasn't true back then just as it isnt true now.
 
#9
Yes agree, unfortunately but. It is contributory in one way as the pay board take into account the oension when working out any pay adjustments. We have paid for our pension with our small and inadequate pay rises over the years. AND why should they be allowed to degrade our pension when we are receiving it ? That is surely criminal !


I admire your determination but you are pissing up a rope. For years the Treasury have wanted to rein in military pensions: it is, for all intents and purposes, non-contributory, generous in the extreme and indexed linked. They hate it and always have.

The Police can bleat and moan as much as they like and, I suspect, the judicial review will fail.
 
#10
So...I left the army with a lump sum of £30k and bought a house outright... Errrrr sorry not many houses about at that price.

Even a Council House...... and you have to be living in a Council House before you can buy it anyway there are none.
And when did you leave the army?

Are you saying you could have moved into a council house and then bought it?
 
#12
Thats 36 years of council discounts (asuming you joined at 18, one year off because they stopped the council discounts in 1996).
You couldnt find a council house for 30K?
My father left in 1996, got about 40 odd k he paid 58K for a four bedroom semi detached house that he bought PRIVATELY.
 
#13
Stacker1 / swingfire, as you say it depends on when you left the service, remember AF pay was not good in the 60's/70's and the non contributory pension (not until at least 12+ yrs srvce) was part of the package, finally salary upon which pensions were based had a massive rise in 1987 (I think) and many things were not disclosed, for instance prior to then only your 1st wife got a widows pension, if you divorced and re married TS to No2, in 1985 as I recall you were not allowed as a seviceman to buy a council house or service house discounted, so it really depends on when you left the service, 1% of £20 quid is less than 1% 0f £35 and so increments continually increase the income gap of pensioners but not the costs, there are always 2 sides and a lot of grey between black & white. Like the state pension to be maybe the 'conditions' should only apply going forward? I enjoy your banter.
 
#14
Swingfire,

One small but important point. You have used multiple Army, Navy and Air force images, which, to the casual observer infers that your newsletters are MOD documents. Do you have permission to use these copyrighted images?

Shiny
 
#19
I served from 1961 to 1997 and the only 'huge' pay-rise I can recall was on Day 1 of Mrs. Thatcher's first government - 30% ish as I recall.
I cannot quote exact dates as I am away from home but in about 1987 there was a large increase in pensions going forward, I left in 1985 and myfriend (same rank, svce, trade etc.) left 3 years later with av. large difference in pension which related to a change in pay etc.
 
#20
The main point I would like to make about this is:
I served for 40 years coming out in 1998 (ok joining boys service at 15) After drawing my pension for nearly 14 years the Government make a decision to reduce it by at least 1.5% a year. OK that may not effect an old codger like me but it does effect; Widows pensions and those guys injured who are young and face a loss of around £600,000 over their lifetime.
Its these youngsters who have given their all and are not being rewarded.

excerpt from our Release:
CPI excludes mortgage interest payments, which are not relevant to the majority of pensioners and benefit recipients: only 7% of pensioners have mortgages
The Veterans answer that with:
This is a misuse of statistics, the figure does not include service personnel. In fact following a request under the Freedom of Information Act the DWP admitted they have no figures for service pensioners who have a mortgage.
The most relevant point to note is that a service career often comes to an end after 22 years at the age of 40. Getting on the housing ladder then becomes an option that is taken much later in life for Armed Forces personnel rather than those in civilian life. This is one of the main reasons why it is so important to align service pensions with the RPI.
The CPI does not take account of the mortgage interest rate, rent, and many other costs associated with housing, which can be the largest item in any family budget.
Many spouses of service pensioners gave up working to be with their husbands/wives and children when they were posted within the UK or abroad, reducing their ability to accrue a private or public sectorpensionoracareer. Thisisreflectedinthemilitarypaystructure,throughtheXFactor.
The Coalition Say:
The methodology used to calculate the CPI takes into account the fact that many people tend to trade down to cheaper goods when prices rise - the RPI does not
The Veterans answer that with:
The stated aim of the DWPʼs is to “protect the purchasing power of pensions” it seems contradictory to use the CPI, which takes account of those needing to trade down.
 

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