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The French dig great defensive positions and the Germans outflank them ?
Actually, according to French Army sources, it has tended to be the German elements and the restrictions that they work under that have put the brakes on the brigade's utility and usefulness and resulted in it being a bit of a backwater avoided by thrusting career-minded French officers.
 

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LE
Kit Reviewer
Actually, according to French Army sources, it has tended to be the German elements and the restrictions that they work under that have put the brakes on the brigade's utility and usefulness and resulted in it being a bit of a backwater avoided by thrusting career-minded French officers.
So I heard.
But given that when the Bde kicked off the major similarity between l'Armée deTerre and the Bundeswehr was that they're both part of NATO, I'm not sure there was ever any general feeling that it was going to be an unprecedented success.
 
So I heard.
But given that when the Bde kicked off the major similarity between l'Armée deTerre and the Bundeswehr was that they're both part of NATO, I'm not sure there was ever any general feeling that it was going to be an unprecedented success.
It has always been a very political exercise.
 

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LE
Kit Reviewer
It has always been a very political exercise.
Such has always been the way, qv. Clausewitz.

While at the formation France was out of NATO but a major player in the EEC.
The politicos wanted or needed more sway militarily, and the only other main EEC mover they'd play with was obviously the Boxes, I don't think an Anglo-French, sorry, a Franco-British Bde would have got further than a Gallic shrug.

The indecorous scrabble by the politicians to rejoin the alliance on the transfer of responsibility for FRY from the UN to NATO was I believe heavily, and understandably, fuelled by their farmers who often appear to be the major political influence in France.
 
Such has always been the way, qv. Clausewitz.

While at the formation France was out of NATO but a major player in the EEC.
The politicos wanted or needed more sway militarily, and the only other main EEC mover they'd play with was obviously the Boxes, I don't think an Anglo-French, sorry, a Franco-British Bde would have got further than a Gallic shrug.

The indecorous scrabble by the politicians to rejoin the alliance on the transfer of responsibility for FRY from the UN to NATO was I believe heavily, and understandably, fuelled by their farmers who often appear to be the major political influence in France.
France was a founder member of NATO, only leaving the integrated military structure in 1966, but remaining part of the alliance politically and still under its mutual obligations. It returned to the military structure in 2009.


 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
France was a founder member of NATO, only leaving the integrated military structure in 1966, but remaining part of the alliance politically and still under its mutual obligations. It returned to the military structure in 2009.
I met many French troops, including Legionnaires, on UNPROFOR.
Come the end of December in 1995 (?) I was redicked to go back for IFOR, and later SFOR, but thereafter only saw French offrs and then only at Tuzla.
Never got to MND-SE, but our Shed said that the French had rejoined NATO.

I, and hopefully some of the leadership, are now better informed - if none the wiser.

Was this the first NATO operation involving French ground forces since de Gaulle pulled the pin ?
 
I met many French troops, including Legionnaires, on UNPROFOR.
Come the end of December in 1995 (?) I was redicked to go back for IFOR, and later SFOR, but thereafter only saw French offrs and then only at Tuzla.
Never got to MND-SE, but our Shed said that the French had rejoined NATO.

I, and hopefully some of the leadership, are now better informed - if none the wiser.

Was this the first NATO operation involving French ground forces since de Gaulle pulled the pin ?
I did three tours in the FRY in the nineties (with BritMil, well after my stint in the FFL). My second tour was under SFOR and in MND SE. The were plenty of French and they were still often nicknamed "the fourth warring faction".My fluency in French, knowledge of their army and its jargon was particularly useful on several occasions.

As to it being their first Op back under the NATO integrated military structure, I'm not sure. Maybe @fantassin can comment when he's back online.
 

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LE
Kit Reviewer
My fluency in French, knowledge of their army and its jargon was particularly useful on several occasions.
Did the French know you were so fluent, or did you let it come as a surprise after some internal comments ?
 
Did the French know you were so fluent, or did you let it come as a surprise after some internal comments ?
It was useful to keep it hidden on occasion. ;)
 
On my first tour, I was in Sarajevo, where I had some liaison with the 13 RDP. I explained the term "it's the dog's bollocks" to them. The next time I visited their place, they had a wooden sign up representing a pair of hairy gonads with "13eme RDP = les couilles du chien" engraved on it.

Edited to add: They seemed particularly pleased that it was British English and not an Americanism.
 
Just discovered this thread thanks to @Condottiere.

Rewinding to the beginning and the discussion of Poles in the UK. Perth has had a large Polish community since WWII. There are over 300 war graves in the local cemetery. An annual commemoration is held. Many of my classmates were of Polish extraction. My Dad employed 2, Stefan and Peter, who fought all the time! My grandparents had Polish soldiers billeted with them



A detachment of 309 Squadron Lysanders was stationed in our village at RAF Scone.

In 1976 I represented my school at the funeral of a teacher, Bogdan Machula. He taught maths as well as fencing and archery. A soft spoken gentleman, the crematorium was packed with local Polish. The singing was haunting, you could feel pain even though I didn't understand a word. I only learned recently he suffered a terrible war and was in a camp, I think Auschwitz, before settling in Perth.

The link below gives more details about Poles in Scotland during WWII.


Apologies for thread drift. I just wanted to give recognition to those who never went home.
 
Just discovered this thread thanks to @Condottiere.

Rewinding to the beginning and the discussion of Poles in the UK. Perth has had a large Polish community since WWII. There are over 300 war graves in the local cemetery. An annual commemoration is held. Many of my classmates were of Polish extraction. My Dad employed 2, Stefan and Peter, who fought all the time! My grandparents had Polish soldiers billeted with them



A detachment of 309 Squadron Lysanders was stationed in our village at RAF Scone.

In 1976 I represented my school at the funeral of a teacher, Bogdan Machula. He taught maths as well as fencing and archery. A soft spoken gentleman, the crematorium was packed with local Polish. The singing was haunting, you could feel pain even though I didn't understand a word. I only learned recently he suffered a terrible war and was in a camp, I think Auschwitz, before settling in Perth.

The link below gives more details about Poles in Scotland during WWII.


Apologies for thread drift. I just wanted to give recognition to those who never went home.
Still plenty of their descendants around, along with more recent Polish migrants. I know many from both groups. Some of the descendants that I know have recently rediscovered their roots in Poland, to their great joy.
 
Just discovered this thread thanks to @Condottiere.

Rewinding to the beginning and the discussion of Poles in the UK. Perth has had a large Polish community since WWII. There are over 300 war graves in the local cemetery. An annual commemoration is held. Many of my classmates were of Polish extraction. My Dad employed 2, Stefan and Peter, who fought all the time! My grandparents had Polish soldiers billeted with them



A detachment of 309 Squadron Lysanders was stationed in our village at RAF Scone.

In 1976 I represented my school at the funeral of a teacher, Bogdan Machula. He taught maths as well as fencing and archery. A soft spoken gentleman, the crematorium was packed with local Polish. The singing was haunting, you could feel pain even though I didn't understand a word. I only learned recently he suffered a terrible war and was in a camp, I think Auschwitz, before settling in Perth.

The link below gives more details about Poles in Scotland during WWII.


Apologies for thread drift. I just wanted to give recognition to those who never went home.

Well before moving to Scotland my wife and I did a touring holiday around the country as a break from working on contract in the Gulf. One of the stopovers was Perth and we visited the cemetery. The Polish war graves were quite poignant, even more so when I found my own surname on one. Quite likely a distant relative.
 

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