Otterburn

#1
Many of us will have travelled up the road from Newcastle to the Otterburn training area at some point. At various stages on the route, as you near the Otterburn village there are a number of old WW2 pill boxes, some with additional concrete fortifications added on. These form a number of lines of defence for the high ground facing north. Anyone any idea why? were we expecting Jerry to invade Scotland and march south or were we really expecting the Jocks to trade sides and invade our green and pleasant land? anyone with any background to these shout out, I would be interested since I drive past them every day now.

Cheers
 
#2
No

There was a regional seat of govenment bunker at the top of the hill - now a cat's home...

look for the masts....
 
#4
Aye, noticed the masts and some contrsuctions around it.

And yes, it was slashing down again today. Sleet, the horizontal kind.
 
#7
I've been there, albeit, not on any kind of military posting, this last summer. I was up in Northumberland visiting a friend from University who then decided I had to see Otterburn, so we went to see his friend up there. He lives in a farm - right next to the base, in sight of in fact. He then attempted to convince me how his family pay cheaper rent for the place on account of his house being between the base and a mortar range. Other than that he just spent the day telling the delinquents of the village that I wasn't from these parts.
 
#9
March_Hare said:
I've been there, albeit, not on any kind of military posting, this last summer. I was up in Northumberland visiting a friend from University who then decided I had to see Otterburn, so we went to see his friend up there. He lives in a farm - right next to the base, in sight of in fact. He then attempted to convince me how his family pay cheaper rent for the place on account of his house being between the base and a mortar range. Other than that he just spent the day telling the delinquents of the village that I wasn't from these parts.
Many years ago they certainly used to fire in (Guns but not mortars) )from the smaller ex area just to the SE of Otterburn to the main ex area. Doubt if it happens any more but his story may have some basis of fact.
 
#11
It's been a little while since I've been down to Otterburn - Barrybuddon seems to be the barren wasteland of choice these days - so my memory is a little hazy.

Jagman, where is the hill with the masts and the bunker?
 
#13
in_the_cheapseats said:
jagman said:
Just to add, more specific to the ones you refer to, its actually the Coquet Stop Line

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coquet_Stop_Line
I'd never even heard of this. Wiki is a great thing.
Couldn't remember the name of that particular line :D Hence the Wiki link.
The whole country is riddled with them, fortunatly some of them are now listed and the historical value is slowly being rcognised.
Even some of the Lake District pass's have pillbox's tucked away on them. Many rivers where designated as stop lines against tanks, the Eden in Cumbria still retains many of its features, lots of the bridges still have fortifications hidden away near them. If you know where to look there is a huge quantity of fortifications still surviving
 
#16
rickshaw-major said:
Dandy-Angus said:
Im trying to think of an army ex area that was worse than Otterburn ?? :x
Garlochhead :evil: I claim my 15 year old Malt :D

A wetter Otterburn with velociraptor midges.
Seconded. The hills of Little Africa are evil and on the main area, that swamp valley that the powerline runs down is simply a breeding ground for no see ums.
 
#17
tarpaulin said:
It's been a little while since I've been down to Otterburn - Barrybuddon seems to be the barren wasteland of choice these days - so my memory is a little hazy.

Jagman, where is the hill with the masts and the bunker?
Err not sure what is in the public domain and what is still restricted.
Sub-Brit has a pretty good databaxe on the places that aren't on the not for public sonsumption list-

http://www.subbrit.org.uk/rsg/sites/

That covers most of the post war stuff.
 
#18
jagman said:
in_the_cheapseats said:
jagman said:
Just to add, more specific to the ones you refer to, its actually the Coquet Stop Line

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coquet_Stop_Line
I'd never even heard of this. Wiki is a great thing.
Couldn't remember the name of that particular line :D Hence the Wiki link.
The whole country is riddled with them, fortunatly some of them are now listed and the historical value is slowly being rcognised.
Even some of the Lake District pass's have pillbox's tucked away on them. Many rivers where designated as stop lines against tanks, the Eden in Cumbria still retains many of its features, lots of the bridges still have fortifications hidden away near them. If you know where to look there is a huge quantity of fortifications still surviving
I still remember fortifications and tank-traps on the beaches in Northumberland, - going back a bit though.
What interests me is who thought that the Boxheads had the capacity to land on the Northumbrian beaches, and to what end?

Also if the Boxheads had arrived at the Coquet stop line then I would suggest that we would have been royally screwed by that point, and getting to the Game Over stage. How could we have mounted a credible counter-offensive from here with most of England occupied and only Scotland free?

So why was so much effort expended on putting in these fortifications in the first place, when it could have been better used elsewhere?

Dandy, I LIKED Otterburn. (Most of the time anyway, apart from the piranha-midges, and the cold, and the rain/snow, which narrows it down a bit.)
 
#19
tarpaulin said:
It's been a little while since I've been down to Otterburn - Barrybuddon seems to be the barren wasteland of choice these days - so my memory is a little hazy.

Jagman, where is the hill with the masts and the bunker?
..look on google maps at Otterburn in sat image. Follow the A696 south to Raylees. Carry on for another 4km.. There are a number of buildings on the east side of the road... follow the tracks up to the masts.. They are quite clear in shadow..
 
#20
At one point the Northumberland Coast was considered as a possible landing point for ze Germans.
Lots of good beaches and no realistic hope of the British mounting a credible defence there for several days after the invasion. The North East did get a fair bit of attention from the Luftwaffe suring the battle of Britain.
The Stop Lines were intended as defence in depth, theory being had the Germans landed then we would defend all the way upto Scotland if necessary
 

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