Orders of Dress

#1
My general interest in military traditions, uniforms and my recent thread on tent caps got me thinking; what is the most ludicrous order of dress you have seen a member (most likely an officer) of the British Army in?

When I was in the CCF about 9/10 years ago, we had one teacher who had recently joined the profession from a cavalry regiment. He would turn up on parades and exercises in tropical combats (the luminous type) with a 58 belt & scrim net as a cravat. To top it all off, he wore his SD hat and carried a riding crop. Everyone else was in C95s.
 
#5
Me in 1984 attending the All Arms Tactics Course. As an officer in N Battery the Eagle Troop of 2nd Field Regiment my summer order barrack dress included nothing issued by the giovernment and no insignia other than my cap badge that identified me as a member of the British Army.

2nmd Regiment Stone coloured shirt, 2nd Regiment Stone coloured trousers, battery stable belt, Eagle battery Buttons on side hat, 2nd Regiment pattern rank slides.
 

BuggerAll

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#6
The London Scottish officer's Patrols take some beating. Known as the Pink Panther suit it consists of Hodden Grey Trews and a No1 dress type jacket with Scottish cutaway front in Hodden Grey with blue collar and gauntlet cuffs and one of those nasty self coloured belts that have crept back into FAD topped off with a Glen Garry.

Hodden Grey is one of the smartest tartans going but the Pink Panther suit is a step too far!
 
C

cloudbuster

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#7
Quite possibly one of those threads where it's best not to ask for photographs.........
 
#8
My general interest in military traditions, uniforms and my recent thread on tent caps got me thinking; what is the most ludicrous order of dress you have seen a member (most likely an officer) of the British Army in?

When I was in the CCF about 9/10 years ago, we had one teacher who had recently joined the profession from a cavalry regiment. He would turn up on parades and exercises in tropical combats (the luminous type) with a 58 belt & scrim net as a cravat. To top it all off, he wore his SD hat and carried a riding crop. Everyone else was in C95s.
Hmm sounds familiar; would fit into the yeomanry rather well. The ICCY C1990 had a squadron leader who was regularly seen on exercise in boots, DPM trousers, worn loose at the ankles, WDgns stable belt (don't ask me where he got that or why he wore it rather than his own squadron's) SD shirt with cravat, barrack dress jersey, barbour (worn open), 58 pattern belt with pistol and S10 pouch, riding crop. Amazingly James wasn't (quite) as mad as this suggests: anybody who can bollock the then Home Secretary (Leon Brittan) on an exercise while dressed like that can't be all bad
 
#10
Hmm sounds familiar; would fit into the yeomanry rather well. The ICCY C1990 had a squadron leader who was regularly seen on exercise in boots, DPM trousers, worn loose at the ankles, WDgns stable belt (don't ask me where he got that or why he wore it rather than his own squadron's) SD shirt with cravat, barrack dress jersey, barbour (worn open), 58 pattern belt with pistol and S10 pouch, riding crop. Amazingly James wasn't (quite) as mad as this suggests: anybody who can bollock the then Home Secretary (Leon Brittan) on an exercise while dressed like that can't be all bad
What's wrong with that form of dress? Perfectly respectable to me!
 
#11
Before Combat 95 was issued the Watchkeepers pool had some very sartorial officers.

In those days the pool had no formal QM dept but did have a large number of officers who had served in regiments long gone from the army list. In 1993 I was on exercise with officers dressed as West African Frontier Force (he had been in the pools since finishing his National Service), Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) and the only two Scots Guards in the TA (allowed to keep their cap badges by kind permission of GOC London District, who had been a subaltern in Peters company).

The oddest item of dress I have seen was one of those dpm twat hats (the baseball type thing) that had had a piece of material sewn on to make it look like a foreign legion kepi, worn by the Brigade Commander of 19 Lt Bde.
 
#12
My JSC had several watchkeeper/PInfo/CIMIC/PQO types whoe were resplendant in HDiv rig. No strange in itself until one wondered why there was a Life Guard, Guardsman and ALS Officer on a TA course.
 
#13
Before Combat 95 was issued the Watchkeepers pool had some very sartorial officers.

In those days the pool had no formal QM dept but did have a large number of officers who had served in regiments long gone from the army list. In 1993 I was on exercise with officers dressed as West African Frontier Force (he had been in the pools since finishing his National Service), Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) and the only two Scots Guards in the TA (allowed to keep their cap badges by kind permission of GOC London District, who had been a subaltern in Peters company).

The oddest item of dress I have seen was one of those dpm twat hats (the baseball type thing) that had had a piece of material sewn on to make it look like a foreign legion kepi, worn by the Brigade Commander of 19 Lt Bde.
From the same Watchkeeper pool I recall such sartorial delights as:

- Khaki WW2-era (?) V-neck jumpers with the draw-string at the waist
- green woolly-pullies with near-white patches
- official pattern woolly-pullies in brown, khaki, puce, sage green, desert, etc
- all shades of puttees, from near-white, through green, to some russet-coloured examples
- web anklets, on someone for whom puttees were a bit nouveaux..
- 1950s-era jungle boots (the type like high-top plimsolls)
- various Scottish things which I have no idea were uniform or not
- green denims
- desert denims + desert boots (original dezzies, that is)
- a huge green parka with a furry hood ("it was issued to me in Gander in '64...)
- about 500 different Gunner jumpers/trousers/footwear combinations ("you can check with my Ajdt, but unfortunately the Battery went into suspended animation in '67...")
- several small dogs
- blackthorn/bamboo/mahogany/hazel - staffs, canes, walking sticks(?), etc

In c.1985 my Regiment in BAOR compelled all its 12-odd subalterns to attend a Divisional "Young Officer Study Day". We thus ensured that we attended wearing 12 different orders of dress - mostly created. Combined with the other Gunner regiments - most of which already had a "special" type of jumper or trouser - we must have come close to 40 different orders of dress. This compared favourably with the rather earnest subbies from the infantry & armoured Regiments, who were depressingly clone-like in their turnout. The Div Comd duly had one of his anti-Gunner "turns", and wrote a snotty note to our CO. Extras all round, although our CO was the first to recognises that "extras all round" between 12 subalterns - all with track records - in fact made no difference at all to the duty roster....
 
#15
I was once inspected by the duty officer wearing a hussar braided jacket held to her quite delightful figure by several large visible safety pins. Punk yeomanry
 
#16
Before Combat 95 was issued the Watchkeepers pool had some very sartorial officers.

In those days the pool had no formal QM dept but did have a large number of officers who had served in regiments long gone from the army list. In 1993 I was on exercise with officers dressed as West African Frontier Force (he had been in the pools since finishing his National Service), Cameronians (Scottish Rifles)..............
I've met all of those. At the same time. In one man. Ploce in 1995 and the senior Watchkeeper for 24 AirMob Bde was a octogenarian half Colonel, mad as cheese and originally from one of the Highland regiments.

I say originally as no-one was quite sure exactly which regiment was home for him.

He threw a young Frrrrrrrrrench liasion NCO out of the Ops Room, citing the killer fact that the Frrrrrrrrench bottled it in 1940, established the Vichy regime and thus were not to be trusted.

I can see him now: venting his spleen against this v handsome (the girlies all had the damps for Jean-Phillipe), v fit, clean of eye and sound of limb Frenchman, all the while leaning on his cromach and dressed in a jaggy bonnet without cap badge, tropical shirt with QOH half-colonel stuff on them, a civvy leather belt holding up trews (he only wore these if he'd soiled his 95s): the trews could'nt be identified, even by our tame Jocks, DMS and Orfficers puttees.

Nice chap, as it happened. But, as I say, barking. Absolutely.
 
#17
40C If it's the chap I think you're talking about he lived on a highland farm with his mother. He walked into the local police station one day and gave himself up for murder. For no apparent reason he killed his mum and torched the house. Currently kept somewhere safe.
 
#18
40C If it's the chap I think you're talking about he lived on a highland farm with his mother. He walked into the local police station one day and gave himself up for murder. For no apparent reason he killed his mum and torched the house. Currently kept somewhere safe.
Ah, well, that's croft-living for you. Suppose it must be sniffing burning peat that does it.

.........though he was definately a game of two halves: heard him, one day, giving one of the RLC Laundry blokes a right verbal seeing-to - all over a missing sock as I recall. He then steps outside the laundry and he and I spend a pleasant 20 minutes as he humorously abuses the local Croat Chief of Police: had me in stitches. As I said - absolutely barking.
 
#19
Resurrecting this thread as just had a funny memory.

Whilst a cadet we had an officer badged Royal Signals. I say "we" but he actually was not affiliated to any school or cadet force. He had the grandiose title of Cadet Forces Signal Advisor and was Captain M*** B*****y. To say he was weird was overstated. His garden was full of old Austin Champs. He also somehow had a military Land Rover series 3 with military plates and decked out with full Clansman signals rig in the back. This was in the early 2000s. It was a military vehicle I am sure, as on visits to Blandford the LAD would service it.

Anyway he had some frankly bizarre orders of dress. His standard rig for almost everything was lightweights tucked into the top of combat highs, no 2 shirt with a scrim cravat and an old 60s pattern dpm jacket open. Head dress depended on his mood or whatever was in his landrover; SD hat, beret, side hat or jungle hat.
 
#20
He also somehow had a military Land Rover series 3 with military plates and decked out with full Clansman signals rig in the back. This was in the early 2000s. It was a military vehicle I am sure, as on visits to Blandford the LAD would service it.
Colonel QOY used to run about in a Range Rover with full secure Clansman rig, but that was the man who offered to purchase CVR[T] for his squadron to replace the Foxes.
 
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