Orde quits NI police for new role.

#1
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/northern_ireland/8000815.stm

Northern Ireland's Chief Constable Sir Hugh Orde is to leave his post and become president of the Association of Chief Police Officers (Acpo).

Sir Hugh, who has been in charge of the PSNI for seven years, narrowly missed out on becoming Metropolitan Police Commissioner earlier this year.

Acpo's 342 members voted on Wednesday for their choice of president.

Sir Hugh said his time in Northern Ireland had been "a rough and challenging ride".

He said he was leaving the Police Service of Northern Ireland in a healthy state.

"I've been here for nearly seven years - I said I'd come for five. I've got mixed emotions about going - this is a great organisation to lead and it's done outstandingly well.

The security threat is at its highest level for a decade, and it is likely that the next chief constable will be a senior officer parachuted in from England.

It has been known for some time in Belfast that Surrey-born Sir Hugh was looking to get back to London.

Only this week, he spoke in a BBC Radio Ulster interview about his hopes of becoming president of the Association of Chief Police Officers (Acpo).

In the same interview, he was asked to choose his favourite music. The first song he chose was Bruce Springsteen's 'Born to run'.

"The time has come (to leave) - fresh eyes look at things differently and we need to move in a slightly different direction."

Home Secretary Jacqui Smith said Sir Hugh had an outstanding record of public service.

"I look forward to working with him as we embed the reforms to policing announced in last year's Green Paper, from further cutting police red tape to building public confidence and tackling local issues that matter to people across the country," she said.

Sir Ken Jones, current Acpo President, said Sir Hugh "brings a wealth of experience and leadership" to the association.

"Increasingly the service and its leadership are being drawn into political controversies and it will fall to Sir Hugh to steer us on a sure path through the forthcoming period, both up to and beyond the next general election," he said.

The chairman of Northern Ireland's Policing Board, Sir Desmond Rea, congratulated Sir Hugh but added that he regretted losing him.

The chief constable will assume his new role in the Autumn, and the process for appointing a successor will now begin, Sir Desmond added.

The Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, Sean Woodward, said Sir Hugh had changed the face of policing in Northern Ireland.


WHAT IS ACPO?
National body comprising chief police officers in England, Wales and Northern Ireland
Almost 350 members, representing 44 constabularies
Provides a bridge between local focus and national concerns
Acpo works with Home Office to set priorities
Members develop strategies, such as for knife crime
Guidance underpins day-to-day to operations

Profile: Sir Hugh Orde

Sir Hugh told the BBC's World at One that policing and politics were "inextricably linked" but the strength of UK policing was that chief constables were operationally independent and held to account.

"I think our model of accountability is very good, we need to hold on to that principle, but that doesn't mean you don't communicate and have sensible conversations and influence and advise," he said.

"I do think that the president of Acpo and other chief officer colleagues are the professional voice of the policing service and politicians need to listen to us."

On the issue of how long suspects should be detained without charge, Sir Hugh said: "No chief constable I know wants to keep anyone in custody a day longer than they absolutely have to, but we have an over-riding obligation to protect our communities and our people."

Sir Hugh said it was important to learn lessons from incidents such as the death of Ian Tomlinson, who was pushed by a police officer at a G20 protest in London and later died.

"Policing is not a science, policing is as much an art as a science, and it needs individual officers to take the ultimate responsibility for the actions they undertake and they do on behalf of the public.

"When they get them wrong, that frankly needs to be acknowledged."
 
#2
"Policing is not a science, policing is as much an art as a science, and it needs individual officers to take the ultimate responsibility for the actions they undertake and they do on behalf of the public.

Wise words IMO, considering he's been HOPSNI for 7 years & admitted it's been a rough & challenging ride, improvements through-out the Force is still needed & as he stated lesson's still to be learned ie: G20

The members of the ACPO have spoken & voted for a new president, good luck to Hugh in his new post
 
#3
One of 'Liarbours' police apparachicks who wasn't a bad operator when under the control of John Stevens at Cambridge. Gets a sniff of high office and turns into a tree hugging, marathon running buffoon, ensuring that 'Tone, the Grinning One's' will and intent was carried forward into the nascent PSNI. The Martin & Gerry song and dance act featured most prominently in his considerations or was it his instructions?

As Napoleon once remarked - "We're promoted to our level of incompetence".

Got fcuked off at the high port at the interview for Met Police Commissioner to relieve another of Blair's apparachicks. As with all good party members however, there's always a consolation prize.
 
#5
Sir Hugh has done a great job as a Chief Con. Well respected as a Coppers Cop. Personally can't see another Englishman 'parachuted' in. I think that Judith Gillespie one our ACCs may get the job. She is respected and would be a safe bet. With the current high threat from the DR crowd somebody with years of experience is needed. Apart from the Met very few ACCs on the mainland would have the experience to lead the Force in these challenging times.
 
#6
Killaloe said:
Sir Hugh has done a great job as a Chief Con. Well respected as a Coppers Cop. Personally can't see another Englishman 'parachuted' in. I think that Judith Gillespie one our ACCs may get the job. She is respected and would be a safe bet. With the current high threat from the DR crowd somebody with years of experience is needed. Apart from the Met very few ACCs on the mainland would have the experience to lead the Force in these challenging times.
Great job? Well respected as a coppers cop? Maybe by a few, not by the majority of us. But that's just my opinion (and most, if not all others I know and work with). A New Labour appointment sent in to do a hatchet job, and that he did very efficiently. Came good with an honest and heartfelt speech at Stevie Carroll's funeral. My estimation of him went up a notch for those undoubtedly genuine words alone. If it's a coppers cop with the experience to take us on during this current climate I'd say Paul Leighton, or Drew Harris at an outside bet. Best of luck to Hugh. Can't say I'll miss him though.
 
#7
Agree FB. Paul Leighton may get the job. However the first ever Female Chief Con of the RUC/PSNI would tick a few boxes. Gillespie may not be the best candidate but I think there are lot of politics involved at the moment.
 
#8
Fancy running a tote? :D My money is each way on either Paul Leighton or a blow-in from across the water. The lovely Judith for Deputy Chief Con. Actually, on second thoughts there's bound to be something about betting on the next Chief Con's appointment in the Code of Ethics. Woe betide he that goes against the good book :D
 
#10
I don't know. As you said, plenty of politics in the job at the moment. May be one or two Bramshill graduates from the Met looking for an excuse to exit the capital fairly soon :D Fresh start and chance of redemption and all that.
 
#12
Judith Gillespie, Paul Leighton, Drew Harris. All with 20+ years experience, all with relevant courses/quals, all have spent their whole careers in and amongst the associated issues peculiar to policing here. Any one of which would be a popular choice of the rank and file. Of course they're not up to it. Better someone with no experience of here eh? Blank canvas, new ideas, fresh approach........ no R.U.C. baggage, sorry service :roll:
 
#13
Here's a wee outsider for you guys..........a birdy tells me Stephen House at Strathclyde has itchy feet already.

You know where you heard it first..........

:batman:
 
#14
Alec_Lomas said:
One of 'Liarbours' police apparachicks who wasn't a bad operator when under the control of John Stevens at Cambridge. Gets a sniff of high office and turns into a tree hugging, marathon running buffoon, ensuring that 'Tone, the Grinning One's' will and intent was carried forward into the nascent PSNI. The Martin & Gerry song and dance act featured most prominently in his considerations or was it his instructions?

As Napoleon once remarked - "We're promoted to our level of incompetence".

Got fcuked off at the high port at the interview for Met Police Commissioner to relieve another of Blair's apparachicks. As with all good party members however, there's always a consolation prize.
Cambridge/3rd report?
 
#15
From the BBC

The criteria for the job of PSNI chief constable states that the successful candidate must have served at least two years at assistant chief constable level or an equivalent post in a police service outside Northern Ireland.

None of the senior PSNI team meet that criteria so whoever gets the job he, or she, will not be a serving PSNI officer.
So basically a colonial police service, but it does leave it open to someone from the Garda
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/northern_ireland/8002935.stm
 
#16
Paul Leighton is retiring in a couple of months.


" Gets a sniff of high office and turns into a tree hugging, marathon running buffoon, ensuring that 'Tone, the Grinning One's' will and intent was carried forward into the nascent PSNI. The Martin & Gerry song and dance act featured most prominently in his considerations or was it his instructions " ?

:D :D :D :D
 
#19
western said:
Dennis48 said:
There's a rumour flying around in the local press over here that someone from the Garda might be in line for the job.
I was joking, so don't blame me.
Not Chief of Detectives Murphy who led the Shergar Inquiry?

Their immediate investigation was not helped by a smart piece of planning by the gang, which had selected the same day as the biggest horse sales in the country, when horseboxes had passed along every road in Ireland. Leading the investigation into the kidnapping was trilby-wearing Chief Superintendent Jim "Spud" Murphy, who became a media hero. His detection techniques were unconventional and a variety of clairvoyants, psychics and diviners were called in to help. During one interview Mr Murphy told reporters: “A clue... that is what we haven’t got.”
 

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