ORBAT

Discussion in 'Army Reserve' started by EX_STAB, May 21, 2010.

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  1. Does your unit have an ORBAT posted up in the TAC?

    I'm sure we always used to have one even if in practice we ran with a scratch ORBAT on weekends depending on who was there.

    I think it's a pretty useful reference for people to see who's in charge of what, where the CoC runs etc.

    Thoughts?


    (other than predictable ones such as "You are at the bottom of it" etc. :) )
     
  2. Yes, and so much more necessary since JPA annual appraisal reporting is now including Tpr-Pvt/ Lcpl, best to add on reporting lines so everybody knows who is in their immediate CoC, and when reports are produced, sent etc. Add wagons too with number plates. The experienced will know it all but it is the newest who need it.
     
  3. Exactly.
     
  4. msr

    msr LE

    Exactly this.
     
  5. The day we don't, I'll sack my 2IC.
     
  6. It does strike me as fairly fundamental.
     
  7. May as well posted a fruitbat. We just divided the numbers who attended into groups and called them sections. Some had a Cpl i/c some had a L/Cpl
     
  8. Basic common sense I should have thought. If the blokes don't know what sec / pl they're in, who's their boss etc, then God help us all.

    But none of it's likely to survive first contact with a Friday evening of course... :D
     
  9. don't have one, badly need one. I can't see our unit getting one put up, they are too busy trying to decide whether we should do any training on a Wednesday night to come up with a brainwave like that.
     
  10. For 50 weeks of the year, we don't really need one. For most weekends that we do, it's enough to either be divided into equal sized groups or herded together.

    There is a nominal ORBAT for each Team, but groupings within the Team depend on the task to be undertaken. On a construction-heavy Camp, Chartered Electrical Engineers will be found holding the idiot end of the tape. On electrical-heavy Camps, the Chartered Civil Engineers will be making the tea and reading up on CPR. Much time is spent deciding on the best match of trades to tasks during the pre-Camp period and identifying supplementary needs. Then at Camp it all changes to reflect the deficiencies and attachments. Even then, the ORBAT remains flexible, allocating resources to the areas of greatest need.

    It's not disorganised, it accurately reflects the reality of operations. It's a good test of management in identifying the changing needs of the the task and the informal skills held by each individual - not only those in the nominal ORBAT of the Team, but also by those who have been drafted in from other Teams - which wouldn't be achieved if we weren't frequently herded together.

    We're rather unique in that we work well by pulling in individuals from different backgrounds (and even units) to provide a mix that gets things done. But then, we are task-led rather than conforming to a rigid hierarchy.
     
  11. I would venture that you are the exception that proves the rule.
     
  12. We have nominal ORBAT


    However at a weekend what usually forms it is allocation of driving licences/FMT