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OPMI(L) or MIL LING

Sheepay

War Hero
At the risk of sounding precious and old fashioned, I rather think this thread is getting into levels of detail which might get uncomfortable. Could we leave it with a warm endorsement of Sheepay's excellent, informative and informed post and with the simple statement that "Int Corps linguists have a variety of interesting, operational and vital roles"?

Gosh, I am blushing!
As I stated in the initial post, the detail is often highly sensitive, and I for one am not willing to go into it, as I'm not 100% confident in where the boundaries might lie.


However . . .


Through reading this, am I right in thinking that SIGINT is not a mandatory part of a Linguist's career or training and SIGINT and HUMINT are the two trades that Linguists can specialise in BUT if one wants to produce intelligence, not only gather information, then SIGINT is the best option.

Are they options to you or are these roles that are forced upon you depending on your skill and capability?

Are SIGINT and HUMINT the only two trades available to OPMI(L)'s?

With combat operations in Afghanistan nearing to an end, what might a Linguist find himself/herself doing in 5 years time and where in the world?

As I stated in my last post, you are not considered a trade-trained OPMI(L) until you have undergone SIGINT TRAINING. Therefore, I would consider it to be mandatory.

The linguist trade CAN be as varied as you like, don't be put off by the thought of being pigeon-holed into a room with no windows. There are options available to do interesting things, and options available to do very mundane things, just like every other job. And just like every other job, sitting around moaning about your lot won't get you anywhere. Be proactive and see where it leads.
 

ehwhat

Old-Salt
Book Reviewer
At the risk of sounding precious and old fashioned, I rather think this thread is getting into levels of detail which might get uncomfortable. Could we leave it with a warm endorsement of Sheepay's excellent, informative and informed post and with the simple statement that "Int Corps linguists have a variety of interesting, operational and vital roles"?

Going back to the statement from GIAO, may I also suggest that we're done and that a sticky is in order?
 

Darth

Swinger
I too agree, as suggested earlier this should become a sticky.
 

Darth

Swinger
Apologies, my fault, did not look.
 

RahZael

Crow
Great post, I had been given the idea that OPMI(L) was actually a specialisation available after having been an OPMI for a while rather than a seperate trade, I'll have to talk to my recruiter and see if I therefore have to alter my choices as the 1st is currently set as an OPMI not OPMI(L).

One question about the mention of credits for degree/masters I was interested to know is will this require more work on top of the standard course? and if anyone has some sort of idea how many credits it is possible to earn during the 18 month course?
 

Sheepay

War Hero
Credits, I cannot comment upon. Yes, earning a degree will mean passing out of the course with tippety-top grades AND a considerable amount of extra work.

However, I will say this, which will not be popular.

If you are considering joining the Army as an OPMI(L) then do not bother your silly little civvy head with such daft things as earning external qualifications. Worry about your interviews, ADSC, your INT CORPS Selection, Phase 1, the 18 month language course, your relevant-to-trade training, on-the-job training and bedding-in-at-unit-time. Then worry about being a good egg with whom people actually want to work with.

This is not a go at you, or the trade. However, the organisations involved have a responsibility to provide a language capability to the wider Armed Forces. This is not a game, it is a requirement. Your job will be to be a competent linguist, and there is a great amount of pride and kudos to be earned from proving yourself to be as such.

People who can learn languages are hard to find. People who can learn languages and who can competently do the job required are harder to find. Real linguists are like rocking-horse shit.

I only fit into the first category, by the way.

The OPMI(L) world is one that offers many opportunities. If you want a stable, boring (in my opinion!) career then it is on offer. If you want postings and tours to far-away climes then they are also available. If you want a job where every week is a new adventure then THAT job is also available. As with any job, and particularly within the Army, YOUR career is what YOU make of it.

There is always somebody managing your career, but that person might also be managing the careers of many other people. Make their life easier by telling them WHAT you want to do, WHY you want to do it, and WHY you're suited for it. if you're not suited for your desired job, then tell your boss WHY you should be put on the courses to qualify you. What's the worst that can happen? You'll be turned down. Nobody ever passed a course that they didn't apply for.
 

RahZael

Crow
Don't worry my main focus is getting on the course first, It's just to have a heads up what to expect as possible qualifications are generally mentioned but I suscpected as you have confirmed to gain those is actually a lot of extra work.
It's not the only thing on my mind about it all, it's just I've already found the answers to most of my questions.
But as you say first things first I'll be hoping to grade well on my ADSC and get my date to visit chicksands.
 
I have read this entire thread twice and I am still a little confused about one aspect if you could help me out please.
So with MIL LING you complete the LLC at stage 3, whilst with OPMI(L) you complete it at stage 2.

In regards to OPMI(L), do you also have to complete a SIGINT course before you progress on to stage 3? And furthermore... does your role depending on whether you decided on MIL LING or OMPI(L) vary considerably? If it does, could you please, obviously within the confines you are allowed to, help me to understand what sort of differences there are between the two roles?

Also, big thanks to Sheepay for this post. I didn't realise there was another option to MIL INT. OPMI(L) seems more like what I was looking for!
 
I am currently in the selection process for Military Linguist. Found this post very useful but I was a bit worried by this quote, as I was told by my CA that during phase 2, your weekends were your own.

Not one person on my course spent more than one weekend a month off camp, because Friday nights are a night off but Saturday/Sunday are days to catch up on work. Especially in the initial six months, social lives (except that of the course as a dynamic) have to be put on the back-burner.

Is it not possible to go home most weekends, to see your wife, children etc?? :shock: Is that the case for the entire 2 years of training? (I understand the military has a 'national security comes first' policy and when on tour it is the same.)

Also, where would a military linguist likely be based in the UK, when not on ops?

Many thanks in advance for any insight.
 

Glad_its_all_over

ADC
Book Reviewer
I am currently in the selection process for Military Linguist. Found this post very useful but I was a bit worried by this quote, as I was told by my CA that during phase 2, your weekends were your own.



Is it not possible to go home most weekends, to see your wife, children etc?? :shock: Is that the case for the entire 2 years of training? (I understand the military has a 'national security comes first' policy and when on tour it is the same.)

Also, where would a military linguist likely be based in the UK, when not on ops?

Many thanks in advance for any insight.

It's not a question of organised work over weekends, tt's to do with keeping up with a ferocious and demanding academic pace - military language courses are full-on, nothing like their civilian equivalents - and there is a lot expected of the student. Many find it useful to dedicate some time at weekends to catching up on what they're struggling with during the week. There will probably be occasional duties as well, some of which will inevitably fall on weekends.
 

Sheepay

War Hero
I am currently in the selection process for Military Linguist. Found this post very useful but I was a bit worried by this quote, as I was told by my CA that during phase 2, your weekends were your own.

Is it not possible to go home most weekends, to see your wife, children etc?? :shock: Is that the case for the entire 2 years of training? (I understand the military has a 'national security comes first' policy and when on tour it is the same.)

Also, where would a military linguist likely be based in the UK, when not on ops?

Many thanks in advance for any insight.

Your careers advisor was correct. Your weekends are your own.
HOWEVER . . .

As per the stickied thread, the workload is phenomenal. Even your most nasty-pasty lightsider is unlikely to tell you otherwise. I can, and will, furnish you with more information (within reason) if you PM me.

THAT SAID . . .

I had two married blokes on my course, both RAF. Both were Phase 2 (brand new) students, with children. Both performed admirably. They had fewer distractions in one sense (squaddie party mentality) and more necessities in the other (genuine responsibilities with their family).
You might be surprised that the 'responsible adult' side caused far more many issues than the 'irresponsible squaddie' side. Not that I'm biased, like.

If you are based at DSL for an LLC you will be entitled to married quarters. If you CHOOSE not to take up married quarters and therefore commute, you will lose out on valuable group study time and social time with your (tiny) course.
As for postings - although other posts make it VERY clear, I would advise you to speak to your careers office, of the recruitment office. PM me.

Choosing to pursue a career as a linguist is a HUGE decision. I tried to make that clear in my initial post. It is not something you dip in-and-out- of, not another string to your bow. It is not an extra skill set, or something to keep in your back pocket.

Operating as a linguist, and choosing to pursue such a career, is a huge commitment. It is a commitment that (should you follow it through) opens many, many doors. It is not something to be pursued half-heartedly. I am a very junior linguist speaking openly, in an open forum with many natively bi-lingual interpreters, and they (I should hope) will agree with me.
 

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