opinions on a Kurdish State

As the title suggests folks, what are the pros and cons of an independent Kurdish nation.
 

chrisg46

LE
Book Reviewer
I would say they are currently earning their right to have one, fighting against IS.
 
There should have been one a hundred years ago (well OK, 98 years ago then).

Most of the wars, strife, genocide etc I have seen over the last fifty years have been down to European powers dividing up the world with a ruler.

If they had divvied up the world according to geography, religion, ethnic, tribal, racial and other such factors we might have had a lot fewer stiffs.

Turkey, Iraq and Iran will bitch and moan but so what. Stuff them. It seems to me that the Kurds are one of the few groups in the region who could make a go of it (putting a bit of factional strife aside) and in fact have been doing so given their recent degree of semi-autonomy.
 

philc

LE
Personally no objections I can think off, I believe the Turks and Co are very anti due to border creep over the next few years, Kurdistan could be very big. Arm them, support them and buy their oil.
 

alib

LE
My Kurdish mates reckon its a great idea but they do point out they'll probably set down to a few years of killing each other as soon as it is declared just as they did when the infant KRG got autonomy.
 
Seems to me that its both inevitable and deserved so best that Britain is at the forefront of helping them. Actual friends in the region would make a nice change.
 
Seems to me that its both inevitable and deserved so best that Britain is at the forefront of helping them. Actual friends in the region would make a nice change.
But how long before they begin to resent us then turn against us?
 

alib

LE
But how long before they begin to resent us then turn against us?
Well I do expect after the fall of Kobane some of them will at least be knocking lumps off the Turks.
 
But how long before they begin to resent us then turn against us?
Given we are already arming them to fight the frothers I don't see any major downside in also supporting their legitimate aspirations to statehood. They have been hung out to dry forever and a day and not taken to attacking us as a result, why would helping them suddenly change that?
 
And Christmas as well .

Seriously though, now would seem a really opportune time in history to 'enable' the redrawing of borders and give a long suffering people their own borders, rather than fairly random straight lines in the sand.
I'll asume the 'old' rating was a result of muzzie style aiming. :D
 
I like kurds and I like Syrians having worked with both bunchs right up to the current messyness

Nothing but high hopes for the Kurds but they are always on the wrong end of the shitty stick. Having said that they've recently been oil booming, wonder how thats going now

If I was going to have a mad minute, throw my life away and offer my dubious services it would be to the Kurds
 

TheBFG

War Hero
Watching some of the News tonight it showed a Kurdish woman fighting alongside the men. Good luck to them.
 

ACAB

LE
I've had a rough and tumble with some Kurdish Immigrants. The first mistake is you think because there is nothing of them it will be a push over. It's like herding cats, the little ******* can slip out of any hold and are as hard as nails.

That said, I would imagine any ground they have gained against IS they intend to keep. And their experience of fighting IS may well be the deciding factor regarding those who think 'We'll have that bit back'.
 
Seems to me that its both inevitable and deserved so best that Britain is at the forefront of helping them. Actual friends in the region would make a nice change.

But for the chance of making new friends you deeply anger others.

I'm of the opinion that it should happen but it's not going to be pretty for the region when it does. Why do we have to arm and train them? At the minute there seems to be a reluctance to do so, I assume because there's a realisation that if we do once IS is out of the way we'd be in a position where we found we'd armed and trained both sides in a civil war.


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Howler

War Hero
But how long before they begin to resent us then turn against us?
It's worth noting that a large percentage of the KRG and almost all the influential businessmen are UK educated to a very high level. This has produced a 'country' run not by a bunch of kleptocratic, slightly evolved goat herders as in most Middle Eastern countries, but by an intelligent, hard working elite who respect human rights and Western values.

My business partner is a case in point. Fled the Saddam era genocide in 1980, moved into a 2 bed flat in Elephant & Castle with 11 other Kurds and put himself through university through delivering pizza leaflets around London. Completed his doctorate and has returned to Erbil to become a government adviser. He is eternally thankful to Britain for giving him the opportunity to progress and will never forget.

All the powerful families, Barzani, Sinjari, Bradosti etc send their children to the UK and the links are very strong. I expect great things from Kurdistan in the future and we need to be side to side with them over the next few years.
 

philc

LE
You do rather get the feeling that the Turks are quite happy to see the Kurds under pressure from another front, no love lost between those two groups. That ISIS are now knocking on the Turkish border may change that opinion.
 
It's worth noting that a large percentage of the KRG and almost all the influential businessmen are UK educated to a very high level. This has produced a 'country' run not by a bunch of kleptocratic, slightly evolved goat herders as in most Middle Eastern countries, but by an intelligent, hard working elite who respect human rights and Western values.

My business partner is a case in point. Fled the Saddam era genocide in 1980, moved into a 2 bed flat in Elephant & Castle with 11 other Kurds and put himself through university through delivering pizza leaflets around London. Completed his doctorate and has returned to Erbil to become a government adviser. He is eternally thankful to Britain for giving him the opportunity to progress and will never forget.

All the powerful families, Barzani, Sinjari, Bradosti etc send their children to the UK and the links are very strong. I expect great things from Kurdistan in the future and we need to be side to side with them over the next few years.


I don't think what you describe is unique to Kurdistan but happened right across Iraq so I don't see it as a guarantee of stability in the future given the current situation in the region.


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