Operational de-compression Canadian Style

#21
Biped said:
Some rather enlightened British commanders in the field have been getting the lads together at regular intervals to sit down and go through recent events amongst their fighting peers. This is also having a positive effect whilst in the thick of it. It was done at CIMIC House by the PWRR Commander, and I think other units are copying the idea.
How times have changed.
After a horrendous tour in early 70s in NI I was dumped outside of my pad still wearing some cam on my face as, I done my last “Patrol” less than four hours before.
I was welcomed into the loving nest that I had built for myself, had a shower, fell asleep at the meal that was put before me, Drunk far too much beer, and as I had had little alcohol in the months before, I quickly fell into a stupor.
Woke in the middle of the night, fought for my life in my nightmare, only to find that I had beaten up the only friend that I have in the whole world, Children screaming, neighbours complaining, guardroom commander taking the hiss, commanding officer indifferent, Two days later sent to UK on trade training, No leave, no time off, training takes over, in Larkhill on training course found myself wondering the streets, can’t remember why. I´m still trying to work out what happened when “That” bomb went off, “Was I really there, why did I have to remove those body parts ? F*ck I´m only 22 years old!! SH*t.Sh*t mustn’t show that I’m in a state, To-night I´ll get drunk with my mates, go down town, kick someone’s head in, smash a couple of windows, that’ll sort me out.
Boy, how times have changed and thank god that you boys are looked after a bit better.
 
#22
western said:
Perturbed said:
Canada has a very small army though and when I was with them they where badly equiped.
How does this make them differ from the badly equipped little army that we have?
Well at the time we had issued gortex and other nice equipment which they did not. I was pretty happy with my lot. Things may be different now. Mind you the "canucks" did get damned good food. The only army I have worked with that was fed better than we are/where.
 
#23
I'm pleased that the idea of decompression has been recognised, better late than never. It is especially important for our lads in 'Stan, where the fighting has been extremely intense and prolonged, and I hope that somebody in MOD spots the Canadian method, and follows it.
 
#24
Taff-Cav said:
After TELIC1 and before we returnd home, we got all our guys in C Sqn who had fought with 3 Cdo Bde together for a huge battlefield tour. We visited all the locations where contact took place and chatted the whole thing through as a large group of laughing friendly comrades in arms. It worked a treat and i'm pretty sure, although not party to facts, that we have no serious cases of PTSD in C Sqn.
Did any serious fighting happen on Telic 1? I was under the impression it didn't kick off until around Telic 4.
 
#25
Falls, I think he meant Telic, as in the Mar/Apl 03 (Gulf War 2). I often get confused as to what to call it, and I was there!!
 
#29
I've done UK decompression and I thought it was very good. At the end of a tour the last thing you want to do is spend 5 days mincing about somewhere being talked to and interviewed by some ballbag counsellor rather than getting home.

2 days in Cyprus was perfect. Please don't knock it until you've tried it - just because the Canadians spend ages doing theirs doesn't mean its any better.
 
#30
Viking_Raider said:
Taff-Cav said:
After TELIC1 and before we returnd home, we got all our guys in C Sqn who had fought with 3 Cdo Bde together for a huge battlefield tour. We visited all the locations where contact took place and chatted the whole thing through as a large group of laughing friendly comrades in arms. It worked a treat and i'm pretty sure, although not party to facts, that we have no serious cases of PTSD in C Sqn.
Did any serious fighting happen on Telic 1? I was under the impression it didn't kick off until around Telic 4.
Well... 2 MCs and a shitload of other stuff in one Sqn usually denotes something other than 'sitting around'. But I do agree, it would have been nice to have slotted many more of them while there were no rules of engagement. This would have put paid to many of them that are NOW causing us so much pain!
 
#31
Over here in Canuckistan, the troops say good and bad things about the de-compression period. For some, they just want to get home, see their family and be left alone for their leave. Others truly appreciate the transition and the opportunity to let off some steam gradually and have a chance to speak with their fellow soldiers before coming back to Canada.

I don't think any organization as large as any military can come up with a solution that suits all soldiers, all the time under all conditions. But, at least the system is trying to take care of the soldiers and from all reports it does seem to be working. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) rates seem to have lowered and the troops returning seem (at least so far) to be in a better, general state of mind.

Earlier in this thread someone mentioned that Canuck soldiers get plane tickets to anywhere in the world partway through a tour. Close, but not exactly true.

We have Home Leave Travel Assistance, which is designed to get the soldier from theatre to their home for a two-week or so period, usually one to four months into the average six month tour. If the soldier goes home (i.e. his home base, where his/her spouse lives or, if single, where mom and dad live), the Forces pays the shot, including plane fare, taxis, etc. However, a soldier may take this benefit and go to a third location (e.g. Australia). So, right now the Forces will pay up to $2500.00 (Canadian dollars - about 1250.00 GBP) to fly the soldier to that location. If his/her ticket costs less than that, the remainder can be used to fly their spouse from Canada to that location. All-in-all a pretty sweet deal, but the troops have definitely earned it.

Different benefits for different militaries and I am sure the UK and US forces have some pretty nice benefits that we don't necessarily see. But, our food is great - and we have some pretty damned fine looking cooks too!

Best to all. Here's to seeing all the troops, Canuck, US, UK, Aussie and all our allies, coming home safely.
 

Similar threads

New Posts

Latest Threads

Top