Operation Market Garden......Mission Impossible?

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
Who knows.

But here's the special airborne officers service dress he had made for himself (displayed in a proper museum)

Shallow, vain poseur that he was, I believe he dreamt it up himself, (after watching one too many B+W Flash Gordon fillum adventures?) :roll:
Patton walt.
 
Who knows.

But here's the special airborne officers service dress he had made for himself (displayed in a proper museum)

Shallow, vain poseur that he was, I believe he dreamt it up himself, (after watching one too many B+W Flash Gordon fillum adventures?) :roll:
Interesting, how do you define a 'proper' museum?
 
O, I dunno - prob'ly start with "It's run by professionally qualified curators and historians, rather than a pub landlord"?

Unless of course Al Murray were the pub landlord in question :thumleft:
Museum snobbery, absolutely fantastic :)
 
And Frederick 'Boy' Browning - a major pusher for Market Garden was the husband of Daphne Du Maurier. The literary wives club have a lot to answer for.
I believe it was her father who lent his name to the Canadian ciggerette company in order to obtain revenue to clear his tax bill. The "D Maurier' ciggi is still manufactured, but no longer sold in the UK.
 

4(T)

LE
Who knows.

But here's the special airborne officers service dress he had made for himself (displayed in a proper museum)

Shallow, vain poseur that he was, I believe he dreamt it up himself, (after watching one too many B+W Flash Gordon fillum adventures?) :roll:


To be fair, pretty much every army produced a range of imaginative uniform design concepts - the 30's were very much the age of Art Deco and modernism. It was not unknown for VSO's to choose their own tailoring styles - Patton in US came up with something very similar for himself.

British battle dress itself arguably owed more to fashion concepts of outdoor wear (ski wear) than military practicality.

As for the Huns and Hugo Boss....
 
'Snoseum' 1 sounds like something that runs out your nose!
I am curious that somewhere that is widely acknowled as "housing one of the finest collections of smuggling artefacts in the country" is not a proper museum?

ARRSE hey ^~
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
I've been working my way through several old Arnhem threads (something to do on the homebound train of an evening) - I found a very positive review by @ugly - who then went on to point out that he can easily digest several hundred pages in a manual of technical data specifications, in a sitting, without breaking stride* - so there's clearly a niche audience for dull historical writing :thumleft:

= = = =
* Ugly: No offence my friend, but that's just plain (borderline Rainman) weiiirrd! :-D
I agree however it’s kept me in work longer than my lack of swear filter should allow
 
Regarding the comms failure within 1st Airborne .
Could they have used captured German radios , both on the tactical net and to contact the higher echelons ?
They must have captured a number , particularly on day 1
 
Regarding the comms failure within 1st Airborne .
Could they have used captured German radios , both on the tactical net and to contact the higher echelons ?
They must have captured a number , particularly on day 1
I'd just say that would be stretching the bounds of feasibility, just a tad.
 
Regarding the comms failure within 1st Airborne .
Could they have used captured German radios , both on the tactical net and to contact the higher echelons ?
They must have captured a number , particularly on day 1
Was the issue not to do with physics rather than numbers of sets?
 
Was the issue not to do with physics rather than numbers of sets?
Possibly, but there's commentary upthread (or perhaps on another similar thread) on the fact that RA FOO Party signallers, with the same radio sets, a bit of technical professional know-how and commitment to attention to detail, managed comms over ranges longer than anything achieved by other communicators at formation, unit and sub unit HQs, which is interesting (at the very least)
 
I believe it was her father who lent his name to the Canadian ciggerette company in order to obtain revenue to clear his tax bill. The "D Maurier' ciggi is still manufactured, but no longer sold in the UK.
I Googled Boy Browning to find the photo of his posing clobber, and happened on an ad for his biography, on a webpage owned by his grandson ("If only I had known him" FFS!) coincidentally (?) bearing the DuMaurier snout logo, suggesting the link has not yet withered to extinction.

Maybe the canny old sod made it a perpetual lease, with a steady revenue stream until doomsday?
 
Patton walt.
Meh.

The Boy was all Savile Row; nicely waisted, cut close to the hip, Guards Barathea

George was more - I dunno - Walmart sport section meets Guns and Ammo at a Primark suppliers design studio (in a light industrial unit in 1930s Hicksville)?
 
Meh.

The Boy was all Savile Row; nicely waisted, cut close to the hip, Guards Barathea

George was more - I dunno - Walmart sport section meets Guns and Ammo at a Primark suppliers design studio (in a light industrial unit in 1930s Hicksville)?
With all those pointy bits of metal inside a tank, not a bad idea...

Sent from my S41 using Tapatalk
 
Back to Arnhem, KOSB were sent in to try to relieve pressure on the Paras, they gave a lot, but it didn't work out.

7th KOSB became glider-borne troops with the 1st Airborne Division, and in September 1944 they were flown into the landing zone west of the village of Wolfheze, near Arnhem. At Johannahoeve Farm and later at The White House, the battalion along with other airborne troops found itself surrounded by an enemy force superior in numbers and equipped with tanks. They fought gallantly but never really had a chance. When the order to retreat was given on 25th September, what had gone in as a 740 strong Battalion had been reduced to 4 Officers and 72 men. The KOSB’s losses at Arnhem, 90% killed and taken prisoner, were the third highest of any battalion engaged. (From the KOSB Web)

And wee Nippy wants a border. She can go and .......................well, you'll all know the rest.
The White House (with some sort of black hole at the front!), this was weeks before it was due to be demolished but, I believe it got a stay of execution.

Typical of the Osterbeck perimeter, the front line, where distinguishable, within yards of each other.

I am lucky, and immensely honoured to have had the opportunity over a number of years to walk the ground with a number of veterans and walk the battle from insertion to extraction on a number of occasions with an Arnhem lifetime resident and historian.

I would urge anyone who has the vaguest interest to visit with any of the reputable battlefield tour companies, but keep an open mind, everyone has an angle or agenda :)

56212449-185D-424B-BFF3-9B442C5C0CEE.jpeg
 

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