Operation Anthropoid

Hat20

LE
Jan Kubis a few days before the mission
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Jan with my sister Jill.my other sister is named Jan in his honour as he and my father were friends..this one is on the internet the others are not and from family collection. My father is in the light jacket.
Same bunch less Jan with Winston Churchill
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NSP

LE
A battalion of Heer Police shot/killed all the men, the women an children were "deported" and the village burned to the ground.
Point of order: as I recall from readings one adult male survived, as he was banged up for assault at the time.

There were two other adult men from the village who escaped the massacre by dint of serving in the RAF and being out of the country at the time but can't remember whether they made it to VE Day or not.
 
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Point of order: as I recall from readings one adult male survived, as he was banged up for assault at the time.

There were two other adult men from the village who escaped the massacre by dint of serving in the RAF and being out of the country at the time but can't remember whether they made it to VE Day or not.
Wasn't Lidice selected because it had men serving with the RAF at the time?
 

Mr_Fingerz

LE
Book Reviewer
Point of order: as I recall from readings one adult male survived, as he was banged up for assault at the time.

There were two other adult men from the village who escaped the massacre by dint of serving in the RAF and being out of the country at the time but can't remember whether they made it to VE Day or not.
"All the men present".

Happy now?
 
Heinz Barth

Heinz Barth. A security police officer who took part in massacres of Czechs in the aftermath of Heydrich's assasination. Later joined the Waffen SS and took part in the massacre at Ordour in France in 1944 with SS Das Reich.

Disappeared after WW2 until 1981 when he was found living under a different name in his native East Germany where he had become a card carrying Communist.

barth04.jpg
 

SurviveToFight

Old-Salt
The massacre of the men of Lidice in the immediate aftermath of the assassination (a "man" being defined as any male aged 15 or over) is shocking enough, but what I find most horrifying is what happened to the children. Despite misleading statements by the Germans and confused reports in the west, only a tiny minority of them were "resettled" with German families. 82 were gassed in Chełmno over a month after Heydrich's death; a totally unjustifiable act of cold-blooded mass murder that is shocking even by Nazi standards.

I live in Prague and sometimes take the bus to Kladno, a large industrial town about 25km away. The route passes through Lidice and the stop there is announced in a child's voice. A moving little touch.
 
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Tomorrow is the 73rd anniversary of Op Anthropoid, which resulted in the death of Reinhard Heydrich.

Jan Kubis and Josef Gabcik, the men who carried out the operation, were subsequently betrayed to the SS, and committed suicide. Rather than be captured.

Heinrich Himmler, ordered that the village of Lidice should be eradicated as an act of retaliation/spite.

A battalion of Heer Police shot/killed all the men, the women an children were "deported" and the village burned to the ground.

Despite the actions taken in retribution for their act, two men need to be remembered for their outstanding bravery.
The Germans were proud of what they were doing and filmed the entire liquidation of the village. The massacre was not carried out by Heer Police, their cuff bands were quite distinct - they were members of the SS Division 'Prinz Eugen', a unit that was known for its atrocities.
 
Wasn't Kurda executed after the war?
 
Monument in Arisaig,Invernesshire to the Czech and Slovak soldiers who trained there.
Also a 2 plaques naming those agents who did not return and a list of operations and dates.
SOE Memorial.jpg
 

TamH70

MIA

Mr_Fingerz

LE
Book Reviewer
The Germans were proud of what they were doing and filmed the entire liquidation of the village. The massacre was not carried out by Heer Police, their cuff bands were quite distinct - they were members of the SS Division 'Prinz Eugen', a unit that was known for its atrocities.
I was under the impression that the Prinz Eugen Division only operated in Yugoslavia, and that the Lidice Massacre was carried out by the Feld-Gendarmarie and the SD
 
The Germans were proud of what they were doing and filmed the entire liquidation of the village. The massacre was not carried out by Heer Police, their cuff bands were quite distinct - they were members of the SS Division 'Prinz Eugen', a unit that was known for its atrocities.
According to Wiki, the 7th SSS Mountain Division Prinz Eugen was composed of ethnic Germans and only fought in Yugoslavia. As in my post #25 about Heinz Barth, he was serving in the Security Police when he took part in the massacres.

From Wiki:

The 7th SS Volunteer Mountain Division "Prinz Eugen" (7. SS-Freiwilligen Gebirgs-Division "Prinz Eugen"),[1] initially named the SS-Volunteer Division Prinz Eugen (SS-Freiwilligen-Division "Prinz Eugen"), was a German mountain infantry division of the Waffen-SS during World War II. It served only in occupied Yugoslavia. Formed in 1941 from both Germans and Volksdeutsche (ethnic German) volunteers and conscripts from the Banat, Independent State of Croatia, Hungary and Romania, the division fought a bloody counter-insurgency campaign against communist-led Yugoslav Partisan resistance forces in the German-occupied territories of Serbia and Montenegro, as well as elsewhere in Yugoslavia.
 
I was under the impression that the Prinz Eugen Division only operated in Yugoslavia, and that the Lidice Massacre was carried out by the Feld-Gendarmarie and the SD
I think that this clip was on World at War and Prinz Eugen was definitely on the cuff legends of the troops around the camera. The Wiki entry also said that they used mainly captured czech small arms so maybe elements were in Prague forming up and equipping before being deployed. Anyway, we shall never know for sure.
 

Mr_Fingerz

LE
Book Reviewer
I think that this clip was on World at War and Prinz Eugen was definitely on the cuff legends of the troops around the camera. The Wiki entry also said that they used mainly captured czech small arms so maybe elements were in Prague forming up and equipping before being deployed. Anyway, we shall never know for sure.

Men[edit]​

Horst Böhme, the SiPo chief for the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia, immediately acted on the orders.[1] Members of the Ordnungspolizei and SD (Sicherheitsdienst) surrounded the village of Lidice, blocking all avenues of escape.[11] The Nazi regime chose this village because its residents were suspected of harbouring local resistance partisans and were falsely associated with aiding Operation Anthropoid team members.[12][13]


Post-war memorial ceremony to honour victims

I know that it's wiki, and that I was mistaken between the Heer Polizei and the Ordnungs Polizei (the Green Police), but it wasn't the 7th SS Mountain Division.
 

Men[edit]​

Horst Böhme, the SiPo chief for the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia, immediately acted on the orders.[1] Members of the Ordnungspolizei and SD (Sicherheitsdienst) surrounded the village of Lidice, blocking all avenues of escape.[11] The Nazi regime chose this village because its residents were suspected of harbouring local resistance partisans and were falsely associated with aiding Operation Anthropoid team members.[12][13]


Post-war memorial ceremony to honour victims

I know that it's wiki, and that I was mistaken between the Heer Polizei and the Ordnungs Polizei (the Green Police), but it wasn't the 7th SS Mountain Division.
OK, whoever it was, they were a bunch of thugs! An interesting footnote which I have seen in a number of articles is that Heydrichs injuries were not as serious as first thought and that he should have survived them easily. There was a logic in getting Heydrich out of Berlin (where the power and intrigue lay) away to Prague where he could be kept an eye on and could not play politics. Unusually for the top Nazis, Heydrich was highly intelligent and very ambitious. His boss, Himmler, was not so intelligent but very cunning and was well aware of his subordinates ambitions. The assassination attempt gave a golden opportunity for a bit of nipping of ambitions in the bud, especially as the doctors were all sent from Berlin (presumably by Himmler).
 
There's a nice what if in the Bernie Gunther novels by Phillip Kerr that deals with Bernie being told by Heydrich that he suspects Himmler is waiting for the opportunity to have him killed. Heydrich initially is on the mend after the assassination attempt only to suddenly succumb to sepsis, the inference being that Himmler has one of the doctors sent from Berlin deliberately botch his treatment in order to kill him.
 
OK, whoever it was, they were a bunch of thugs! An interesting footnote which I have seen in a number of articles is that Heydrichs injuries were not as serious as first thought and that he should have survived them easily. There was a logic in getting Heydrich out of Berlin (where the power and intrigue lay) away to Prague where he could be kept an eye on and could not play politics. Unusually for the top Nazis, Heydrich was highly intelligent and very ambitious. His boss, Himmler, was not so intelligent but very cunning and was well aware of his subordinates ambitions. The assassination attempt gave a golden opportunity for a bit of nipping of ambitions in the bud, especially as the doctors were all sent from Berlin (presumably by Himmler).
He died as the result of secondary infection, probably caused by horsehair upholstery from his car seats entering his wounds as a result of the grenade explosion.
Penicillin would have saved him, but the Germans didn't have it.
 

Mr_Fingerz

LE
Book Reviewer
OK, whoever it was, they were a bunch of thugs! An interesting footnote which I have seen in a number of articles is that Heydrichs injuries were not as serious as first thought and that he should have survived them easily. There was a logic in getting Heydrich out of Berlin (where the power and intrigue lay) away to Prague where he could be kept an eye on and could not play politics. Unusually for the top Nazis, Heydrich was highly intelligent and very ambitious. His boss, Himmler, was not so intelligent but very cunning and was well aware of his subordinates ambitions. The assassination attempt gave a golden opportunity for a bit of nipping of ambitions in the bud, especially as the doctors were all sent from Berlin (presumably by Himmler).
Heydrich died from sepsis. He was in charge of the biggest axis military economy outside of the Reich. Conspiracy theories don't sit well here.
 

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