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Open University

#1
Sorry if this is in the wrong forum - I've just enrolled on T194 Engineering from the OU. Being new to study I have a certain ammount of trepidation, especially as I haven't done advanced maths in over 30 years. Anyone else on these boards done this and any help, guidance or advice is greatly appreciated!
 
#2
I did the old T195 when I did my degree and even though its got maths in the title of yours I'm sure you'll be fine. The materials I always found to pretty good at leading you and structured plus as well as the course forum you can always ask your tutor.

Good luck with it and if you get the bug, look forward to those warm summer days sat indoors doing a TMA while everyone else is out having fun. Though they do seem to have more winter courses these days.
:)
 
#3
Im halfway through my Business management degree with the OU, it was a bit of a shock trying to get back in learning and studying for exams. The OU is pretty good though and there is plenty of help and advice, one thing I do advise is find the T195 Facebookgroup, each module I have done has had a group set up by other people on the course and everyone joins, lots of good advice as the course goes on.
 

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
#6
It's been years since I did the OU, but I've just done a quick check.

These are the entry requirements: hopefully, you've checked off the preparatory courses first.

T194 | Engineering: Mathematics, Modelling, Applications

It's a half module course, so you're basically in for 20 hours a week study. Figure on several evenings plus the bulk of Sunday.

As mentioned earlier, check out the Facebook group for anyone near to you. Having someone to talk to definitely helps.

Course starts on the 6th October, so there's not a lot of time to brush up your maths if you're rusty. If you are worried about the maths, get onto Amazon and get a non-OU maths textbook or two. The maths is generally easy once you get your head round it - it's getting the basic understanding that's usually the difficult part. Non-OU textbooks often have a slightly different way of doing things than can give insight. Second hand ones are generally fine - the techniques won't change much

Don't shortcut on working though the examples in the course material - each will be designed to teach you a specific skill. Start skipping them and you'll make your life more difficult later.

Good luck,

Wordsmith
 
#7
I never bothered with OU. I just captured the vibe by growing my hair long and buying a baggy green corduroy suit with leather elbow patches and a pair of old hush puppies from an Oxfam shop.
 
#8
The OU fully appreciate that their courses are a return to study for most people and so they provide (or make available) revision and study guides. The one they provided me with is actually called; The Sciences Good Study Guide. It's 400+ pages of revision maths, how to plan, how to organise your studying, how to tackle assignments and so on.

As this is a first level course some of your tuition will be about getting yourself organised. There could even be a TMA just on how you plan to schedule your time. So not is in just a worthwhile thing to do, it actually makes up a part of the tuition and course grade.

You may get offered the chance to go to weekly tutorials, where you can meet the group and have a lecture/study session. These are well worth going to as you get the chance to ask questions and get better explanations, plus you can get to know the level of content your answers and assignments should have. Although with travelling time there and back you could loose an evening of private study time it's still worth going along if you can.

If they suggest a course will take, say, 20 hours a week then expect it to take closer to 24 hours. With just one day for yourself and your admin, you'll need to average 4 hours a day for the other 6 days. But some of that is watching videos and reading stuff so it won't seem like 4 hours. You'll soon settle in to it though - just spend less time being idle on line in places like this :)

Edit: I've just taken a look at T194 Engineering and it seems that you must have already done T193. So there's me thinking you were an OU beginner but you'll already know about the things I've said.
 
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#10
To the OP, good luck with your studies from Devexwarrior BSc (Hons) OU, Mrs Devex BA(Hons) OU, eldest Devexette (undergrad) OU.

Only the youngest has broken the mould and gone full time to uni. I also did a PGCE and a Masters distance learning - hard work but very rewarding.
 
#11
I'm currently doing a distance learning course at the moment actually - The Analytics Edge run by MITx on EdX (preparing for a career sidestep into data science).

It reminds me a lot of when I studied with the OU whilst serving, the coming home from work, and then hitting the books (or PC in this case) after something eat and working until midnight and only communicating with fellow students through forum posts (as the OU was back in 2003/4). Good times, weirdly!

Enjoy your course :)
 
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AfghanAndy

On ROPS
On ROPs
#12
Sorry if this is in the wrong forum - I've just enrolled on T194 Engineering from the OU. Being new to study I have a certain ammount of trepidation, especially as I haven't done advanced maths in over 30 years. Anyone else on these boards done this and any help, guidance or advice is greatly appreciated!
Going in as a mature student can help.

Treat yourself to a book called ‘mathematics for engineers’ by a guy called Stroud.

So we’ll written even an idiot could understand it.

Secondly, and this is one of the more important lessons learnt since my first bout of university. There’s this thing called the internet and especially on YouTube you’ll find that there’s deviants out there who positively enjoy posting short, medium and very in depth tutorials on how to do things ranging from how to change the brushes on the electric motor for your washing machine, to how to do complex binomial theorem and integration.

Thirdly. Well done for you signing up. I tried OU but couldn’t get on with it as I kept getting sidelined by our interference in hot dusty places we shouldn’t really have got involved with. My advice would be treat it like a job. Set aside fixed times each week when you will study even if that means giving up a whole Saturday or Sunday. Personally I’ve always found studying at home distracting so I’d hop on the bike and cycle to the local library to study. It delineated home and study nicely.
 
#13
I had been doing an MSc in Engineering Business Management at Cov Uni but dropped out for personal reasons.

At some time in the future I'd like to revisit academia but to do a degree purely for personal achievement rather than any career related reason.

I'm not yet sure exactly what I want to study but I'm thinking along the lines of history, history & politics, the classics, the liberal arts, English language, or something similar.
 
#15
I had been doing an MSc in Engineering Business Management at Cov Uni but dropped out for personal reasons.

At some time in the future I'd like to revisit academia but to do a degree purely for personal achievement rather than any career related reason.

I'm not yet sure exactly what I want to study but I'm thinking along the lines of history, history & politics, the classics, the liberal arts, English language, or something similar.
Good for you mate, go for it.
 

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