Op GRANBY - 25 Years Ago

I was in a 1000 bed military hospital at the time the air campaign started on 16 Jan 1991. I was filling an administrative billet though at the time so I was not called to overseas duty for Operation Desert Shield/Storm. Oddly enough though, my boss, the adjutant, MAJ D** M****, an MSC officer, was called up and went with the rest of the medical personnel that were cherry-picked from our unit. (They left in November 1990 and came back in April 1991) I think they were used as fillers for the 50th General Hospital (1000 Bed) which was in country at the time. The MAJ was a real card and wrote me a couple of letters saying how nice it was to be in KKMC and wished I was there with him. He illustrated his letters with palm trees, camels crossing a sand dune, and Scud missiles being shot down by Patriot Missiles. I didn't know he had such talent. That's OK though; I gave him his due for that little jolly. I got my own back when I went with the 521st Maint Bn for Operation Safe Havens in Panama. (Attached to the 193rd Inf) Got a medal and a ribbon out of it too. :thumleft:

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KKMC was my home for seven years - loved every minute of it.
 
I was in a 1000 bed military hospital at the time the air campaign started on 16 Jan 1991. I was filling an administrative billet though at the time so I was not called to overseas duty for Operation Desert Shield/Storm. Oddly enough though, my boss, the adjutant, MAJ D** M****, an MSC officer, was called up and went with the rest of the medical personnel that were cherry-picked from our unit. (They left in November 1990 and came back in April 1991) I think they were used as fillers for the 50th General Hospital (1000 Bed) which was in country at the time. The MAJ was a real card and wrote me a couple of letters saying how nice it was to be in KKMC and wished I was there with him. He illustrated his letters with palm trees, camels crossing a sand dune, and Scud missiles being shot down by Patriot Missiles. I didn't know he had such talent. That's OK though; I gave him his due for that little jolly. I got my own back when I went with the 521st Maint Bn for Operation Safe Havens in Panama. (Attached to the 193rd Inf) Got a medal and a ribbon out of it too. :thumleft:

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Yeh, but your lot get a medal just for going for a dump. ;) :D
 
“Magic City”.
Ran the perimeter every night, about 8k and down to the main gate and back to the hospital on Fridays (when I wasn't off to Kohbar for the weekend). The US helicopter maintenance compound was redesignated The Royal Hafr Country Club. Happy daze.
 
Well, why does one spend the best years of one's life a-soldiering? Tea and Medals, of course. (and a chance to pick up the odd shiny bauble here and there. And wenches - don't forget wenches.).

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Before the war started , Major did a short broadcast to the nation explaining why we were going to force Saddam out of Kuwait.
Bush did the same.

It must have been obvious to Saddam that Iraq couldn’t win this war, why did he continue?
 
Before the war started , Major did a short broadcast to the nation explaining why we were going to force Saddam out of Kuwait.
Bush did the same.

It must have been obvious to Saddam that Iraq couldn’t win this war, why did he continue?

Once committed he knew he would be ousted if he cut and ran. Tribal loyalty coupled with torture and suchlike.
 
Before the war started , Major did a short broadcast to the nation explaining why we were going to force Saddam out of Kuwait.
Bush did the same.

It must have been obvious to Saddam that Iraq couldn’t win this war, why did he continue?
He couldn't back down, loss of face etc. When the ceasefire was announced he said Iraq had won.
 
I was in a 1000 bed military hospital at the time the air campaign started on 16 Jan 1991. I was filling an administrative billet though at the time so I was not called to overseas duty for Operation Desert Shield/Storm. Oddly enough though, my boss, the adjutant, MAJ D** M****, an MSC officer, was called up and went with the rest of the medical personnel that were cherry-picked from our unit. (They left in November 1990 and came back in April 1991) I think they were used as fillers for the 50th General Hospital (1000 Bed) which was in country at the time. The MAJ was a real card and wrote me a couple of letters saying how nice it was to be in KKMC and wished I was there with him. He illustrated his letters with palm trees, camels crossing a sand dune, and Scud missiles being shot down by Patriot Missiles. I didn't know he had such talent. That's OK though; I gave him his due for that little jolly. I got my own back when I went with the 521st Maint Bn for Operation Safe Havens in Panama. (Attached to the 193rd Inf) Got a medal and a ribbon out of it too. :thumleft:

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Is that known as the 'Bitch Slap' medal?
 

Dwarf

LE
Book Reviewer
He couldn't back down, loss of face etc. When the ceasefire was announced he said Iraq had won.
Not from a Western point of view. But he alone stood up against a massive, mainly Western, coalition with all the latest kit. That he lost on the ground wasn't the point, it was the facing up to the Great Satan infidel led forces despite the inevitable loss. That from an Arab point of view is a win.
 
Is that known as the 'Bitch Slap' medal?
Envious people who don't have one of their own on their sunken chests have been known to so call it. ;-) It's official title is the Humanitarian Service Medal.
 
I was in a 1000 bed military hospital at the time the air campaign started on 16 Jan 1991. I was filling an administrative billet though at the time so I was not called to overseas duty for Operation Desert Shield/Storm. Oddly enough though, my boss, the adjutant, MAJ D** M****, an MSC officer, was called up and went with the rest of the medical personnel that were cherry-picked from our unit. (They left in November 1990 and came back in April 1991) I think they were used as fillers for the 50th General Hospital (1000 Bed) which was in country at the time. The MAJ was a real card and wrote me a couple of letters saying how nice it was to be in KKMC and wished I was there with him. He illustrated his letters with palm trees, camels crossing a sand dune, and Scud missiles being shot down by Patriot Missiles. I didn't know he had such talent. That's OK though; I gave him his due for that little jolly. I got my own back when I went with the 521st Maint Bn for Operation Safe Havens in Panama. (Attached to the 193rd Inf) Got a medal and a ribbon out of it too. :thumleft:

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Your man's liking for KKMC is interesting. Back then the main hospital had just been commissioned and the staffing transplanted from the much smaller pre-fabricated buildings at the other end of the base (which incidentally were kept open as a hospital for the south-east Asian workforce who lived nearby.

The hospital was constructed according to a US design and fabricated at a purpose-built plant also located within the general area. It was a pretty neat hospital, but the civilian staff at that time were not competent to run it and regardless of budget, much of it never ever worked. For example, there was a state of the art Angiography suite - when I left in 2003, it still had not ever been used.............though it was top of the list of attractions when VIPs were shown round.

On the plus side, as the workforce developed it became a first-class place to work and its Facebook pages are full of compliments of those who still miss it. It took a lot to turn it round, but I have very happy memories of the place and the years spent there. The small circular area to the right of the road near the octagonal main base is the hospital compound (shown in the second image as an example of the scale of the place) - it also had its own football stadium and airport (not shown). Hospital main entrance in third picture - 330 beds all specialties.
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Mighty interesting. It's nice to actually see a location my comrade wrote about, even 25 years later. It's interesting that the bird's eye view reminds me of the moon base in Space 1999.
 
Mighty interesting. It's nice to actually see a location my comrade wrote about, even 25 years later. It's interesting that the bird's eye view reminds me of the moon base in Space 1999.
I will try to dig out my photographs, I have hundreds...somewhere. In the main photograph, the two white roofed areas on the left of the main octagonal area are the tank sheds. MTBs in one and medium are in the other. Although it was an armour heavy division, it also contained mechanized infantry battalions - these were sent south to the Yemen border in the late 90's, but returned after about 6 months. the circumference of the Octagonal area was around 9k (I used to run it every evening), the main gate and back was 14K (Friday's only).

A fair bit of it was underground in the main admin area in the centre. It included a 36 chair Dental hospital and the Officers Club. Most of the support services and shopping malls are to the right (out of picture) and every unit had its own Desert Tent complete with Satellite Tv and air conditioning. It was rough :cool:
 

Nemesis44UK

LE
Book Reviewer
Can someone please advise because my brain is all foggy with age and alcohol?

I was in 3 ADSR and went out with them in November 1990. However, there is no mention of 3 Div on the official maps, just 1st Armoured Div (BR).

Were elements of 3 ADSR folded into 1 Div?
 
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