Op Carthage - 21 March 1945

On this day, 75 years ago, my Uncle David climbed into his 64 Sqn Mustang and headed off on another raid, this time he didn't come back.


Yesterday, my eldest daughter received a letter confirming her acceptance to RAF Cranwell to begin Officer training.

' Per Ardua ad Astra '
 
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On this day, 75 years ago, my Uncle David climbed into his 64 Sqn Mustang and headed off on another raid, this time he didn't come back.


Yesterday, my eldest daughter received a letter confirming her acceptance to RAF Cranwell to begin Officer training.

' Per Adua ad Astra '
Uprated to Excellent.

Thank you for sharing.

I wish the very best for your daughter at RAF Cranwell.
 
Uprated to Excellent.

Thank you for sharing.

I wish the very best for your daughter at RAF Cranwell.
Many thanks for your good wishes.

After 4 years of Uni and a period of rehabilitation to recover from a sporting injury, her hard work has finally paid off.

I am immensely proud of her.
 
TV listings are vague, but I suspect that today's Air Warriors on Smithsonian is about the Mustang.

13:00 - hurry, hurry
 
There is a better documentary on YouTube including interviews with the Danish prisoners and also the Master Navigator of the raid, very humble men and very humbling to watch.


If you ever visit Denmark it is worth a visit to where the Shell House was, now rebuilt but a plaque bears memorial details of the raid.
Incredible flying for those days, sadly with some collateral damage too.
 
There is a better documentary on YouTube including interviews with the Danish prisoners and also the Master Navigator of the raid, very humble men and very humbling to watch.


If you ever visit Denmark it is worth a visit to where the Shell House was, now rebuilt but a plaque bears memorial details of the raid.
Incredible flying for those days, sadly with some collateral damage too.
I went there 5 years ago with brothers and cousins.
Also went to the CWGC cemetery , the school that got accidentally hit, killing loads of children, and went to the exact location ( a lovely park in town ) his plane came to rest. He had glided it in and was still alive when a very brave local fireman, coming off duty, ran over to try and get him out of the cockpit. He was very badly wounded, didn't last long but spoke to the fireman just before he died.

When I was there, municipal gardeners had just expanded an area of planting , and discovered a part of his plane which was given to me. It was a fitting on the underside of the wing that directed spent cartridge cases away from the body of the aircraft.
I passed it on to the RAF Bentwaters Museum.
( where 64 Sqn came from )
 
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