Op Banner photos - some memories for the old and bold

I vaguely recall a comment on ARRSE from the dim and distant past about the Guards approach to bullshit in the field..
When the Mills 36 Grenade was first introduced in 1915, its tactical use was discussed and agreed. Infantry companies were to form and to train Grenade squads under a nominated company officer, The RWF and other units decided to call the Gren squads 'Grenadiers.' This news got to the ears of the Guards Division, they considered it 'audacity' that mere infanteers should have such face. The High Command agreed that they would become 'Bombing Squads,' which they were until the end of the war.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Whereabouts in Catterick was it situated?

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Bloody hell. I'm not even sure where Catterick is now. But I seem to think it was near what passed for a parade of shops. A very small parade, more a paradette. Possibly opposite the Church of Scotland canteen, but that is just a vague idea.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
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Chinstraps? At a basic training pass out parade? Gad, sir. That is heresy.
It was a windy day in November in Catterick when I passed out of Basic (as if there's any other weather at any time). We were issued spare chinstraps five minutes before we marched on, handed back about 30 seconds after we marched off.
 
When the Mills 36 Grenade was first introduced in 1915, its tactical use was discussed and agreed. Infantry companies were to form and to train Grenade squads under a nominated company officer, The RWF and other units decided to call the Gren squads 'Grenadiers.' This news got to the ears of the Guards Division, they considered it 'audacity' that mere infanteers should have such face. The High Command agreed that they would become 'Bombing Squads,' which they were until the end of the war.
see the link for French WWI infanteer bombers When WWI soliders weren't sharing their armor, they were stealing it
 
It was a windy day in November in Catterick when I passed out of Basic (as if there's any other weather at any time). We were issued spare chinstraps five minutes before we marched on, handed back about 30 seconds after we marched off.
We were issued rifles with bayonets, modern army eh
 
When the Mills 36 Grenade was first introduced in 1915, its tactical use was discussed and agreed. Infantry companies were to form and to train Grenade squads under a nominated company officer, The RWF and other units decided to call the Gren squads 'Grenadiers.' This news got to the ears of the Guards Division, they considered it 'audacity' that mere infanteers should have such face. The High Command agreed that they would become 'Bombing Squads,' which they were until the end of the war.
When we were demo battalion we saw lots of different mobs come through,some were better than others.
I remember the Grenadiers all having identical green woolly hats,clearly bought for that exercise.
And I heard at least one of them wanting to get back to do some proper soldiering.
Back to the thread.
 
Can't remember exactly where I read this though it definitely came from a Guards officer, probably Grenadiers. He recalled that when the Guards Armoured Division was forming up in the UK and they were all getting used to new-fangled things like tanks and radios his CO was baffled as to why whenever he called up on radio to speak to his Sgt.Major's call-sign, there was always a distinct pause before he answered up. The mystery was soon solved when he happened to pass the Great Man's tank and saw him on hearing a call, spring to attention in the turret l, salute with the regulation pause of Twop-threep! and then and only then, reply.

Edit: I think the source of this was General Sir David Fraser and the book was possibly "And We Shall Shock Them: British Army in the Second World War".
 
When the Mills 36 Grenade was first introduced in 1915, its tactical use was discussed and agreed. Infantry companies were to form and to train Grenade squads under a nominated company officer, The RWF and other units decided to call the Gren squads 'Grenadiers.' This news got to the ears of the Guards Division, they considered it 'audacity' that mere infanteers should have such face. The High Command agreed that they would become 'Bombing Squads,' which they were until the end of the war.
Yep, that why Royal Signals engineers are not called Engineers, "Come to fix my broadband?, No, I thought you had a river that needed bridging".
 
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Bloody hell. I'm not even sure where Catterick is now. But I seem to think it was near what passed for a parade of shops. A very small parade, more a paradette. Possibly opposite the Church of Scotland canteen, but that is just a vague idea.
Ta - have a look at the map @Stonker kindly put up. I was in Catterick about 24 yrs ago and I had trouble relating how it appears now to what it was like then. I think you might have been there a bit before me!

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old_fat_and_hairy

LE
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Ta - have a look at the map @Stonker kindly put up. I was in Catterick about 24 yrs ago and I had trouble relating how it appears now to what it was like then. I think you might have been there a bit before me!

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It was around 1961 when I was there. But I looked at the pics and it seemed to be where I remembered.
 
When the Mills 36 Grenade was first introduced in 1915, its tactical use was discussed and agreed. Infantry companies were to form and to train Grenade squads under a nominated company officer, The RWF and other units decided to call the Gren squads 'Grenadiers.' This news got to the ears of the Guards Division, they considered it 'audacity' that mere infanteers should have such face. The High Command agreed that they would become 'Bombing Squads,' which they were until the end of the war.
Completely ignoring the inconvenient truth that back in the day each infantry battalion had a Grenadier Company. Mind you, if they'd been any good they'd have been in the Light Company!!

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Did they take the wife and kids with them? View attachment 362072
No, but when I was asked to 'repurpose' it in 1985 after a few years of disuse I found an Army Ingersoll padlock on the door, windows boarded up with 24hr ratpack covers and a fridge in the back garden that had been used for 5.56mm zeroing practice!
 
A couple of photographs taken by covert patrols in South Armagh early seventies - courtesy of the Hampshires: View attachment 362062 View attachment 362063
Doing OPs on similar crofts round about Armagh, when a bit of a party or sing song was going on inside, often the female visitors would come out in twos or threes and do their'ablutions' just outside the front door. It seemed the norm for the area!
 
Our first tour there was in the very late 1960s and early 70s. We managed to have covert types who didn't look like extras from a bad Jason Statham film. Or even a good one, if that is possible.
I'm not saying its true in every case but it does seem to happen. Would you put the quality of your effort down to the personalities in charge or those involved or what?
 
I bumped into an old pal when he was on a weekend leave from his Det course.

He looked fcuking ridiculous with his '70s hairstyle, sideys and porn 'tache.

He acknowledged that he looked a real twat, but the course had been told to do it, as the logic was that an inevitable early tour compromise could be softened by a radical change of appearance.

Considering this was early 2000s, I would have thought his appearance would guarantee an early compromise.

Still, only in the army, and all that.

I didn't do a BANNER, it was DESCANT by the time I got there. Our white vans had to be first and last paraded including cleaning inside and out. But we could sign out a length of timber from the QM's with empty crisp packets, old newspapers etc nailed to it to make your immaculate civvy van look old. As you say, only in the army.
 
Doing OPs on similar crofts round about Armagh, when a bit of a party or sing song was going on inside, often the female visitors would come out in twos or threes and do their'ablutions' just outside the front door. It seemed the norm for the area!
The drain that you would often find at the front of cottages or down the middle of a byre is known as "the group". Hence the expression "He/She/They are used to pissing in the group".
 
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