Op Banner photos - some memories for the old and bold

Not directly Op Banner, but perhaps relevant to the roots of the conflict are the various divergent elements of Irish Politics. The attachment is a typewritten letter by James Connolly which illustrates his left wing socialist roots which may not have been shared by more small c conservative nationalists View attachment 360947
I bet our Gerry, in his 1970s/1980s Marxist Socialist Revolutionary iteration, thought him a 'revisionist' (wasn't that the term in use to justify killings in The Party under Lenin?) and a weakling.
 
I bet our Gerry, in his 1970s/1980s Marxist Socialist Revolutionary iteration, thought him a 'revisionist' (wasn't that the term in use to justify killings in The Party under Lenin?) and a weakling.
I was once told that the first thing to plan for in Irish politics is...…..the split!

I wonder if there is a common factor in all societies that are or perceive they are on the verge of a new democracy, namely that there is 'power' up for grabs and all the loonies crawl out of their shells with variants of polemical tracts ranging from, you guessed, extreme left to extreme right.
 
all the loonies crawl out of their shells with variants of polemical tracts ranging from, you guessed, extreme left to extreme right.
That may be true, but that ain't the guaranteed path to power. Look at Joe Stalin. No doctrinal bollox for him. Just ruthless focus on personal advancement.

The doctrines are just stage dressing for personal ambition.
 
I would think that the orange tradition is the last thing the Fenians want represented.
Wiki:

“The green pale of the flag symbolises Roman Catholics, the orange represents the minority Protestants who were supporters of William of Orange, who had defeated King James II and his predominantly Irish Catholic army[14] at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690.[15] His title came from the Principality of Orange in the south of France that had been a Protestant bastion from the 16th century. It was included in the Irish flag in an attempt to reconcile the Orange Order in Ireland with the Irish independence movement.[citation needed] The white in the centre signifies a lasting peace and hope for union between Protestants and Catholics in Ireland.[16] The flag, as a whole, is intended to symbolise the inclusion and hoped-for union of the people of different traditions on the island of Ireland, which is expressed in the Constitution as the entitlement of every person born in Ireland to be part of the independent Irish nation, regardless of ethnic origin, religion or political conviction.[17][18] There are exceptions to the general beneficent theory. Green was also used as the colour of such Irish bodies as the mainly-Protestant and non-sectarian Friendly Brothers of St. Patrick, established in 1751.”

BTW not all Irish are Fenians.
 
Wiki:

“The green pale of the flag symbolises Roman Catholics, the orange represents the minority Protestants who were supporters of William of Orange, who had defeated King James II and his predominantly Irish Catholic army[14] at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690.[15] His title came from the Principality of Orange in the south of France that had been a Protestant bastion from the 16th century. It was included in the Irish flag in an attempt to reconcile the Orange Order in Ireland with the Irish independence movement.[citation needed] The white in the centre signifies a lasting peace and hope for union between Protestants and Catholics in Ireland.[16] The flag, as a whole, is intended to symbolise the inclusion and hoped-for union of the people of different traditions on the island of Ireland, which is expressed in the Constitution as the entitlement of every person born in Ireland to be part of the independent Irish nation, regardless of ethnic origin, religion or political conviction.[17][18] There are exceptions to the general beneficent theory. Green was also used as the colour of such Irish bodies as the mainly-Protestant and non-sectarian Friendly Brothers of St. Patrick, established in 1751.”

BTW not all Irish are Fenians.
Fair enough,I consider myself schooled.
I know that not every Irishman is a fenian,but the ones that were trying to kill us,generally,were.
 
BTW I caught a bit of "Pop Goes Northern Ireland" covering 1986. It included the appearance of Martin Galvin outside SF headquarters. I had forgotten that the RUC had bulldozed their way through the crowd to try and reach him AND that it was preceded by Gerry giving a wee speech about how it was an opportunity for the RUC and Army to kill catholics as they weren't moving. He sounded like he was bricking himself.
 

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That is an interesting take.
It's unfortunately quite common. Revolution is indeed not a dinner party and the people who do it best are those who are best at violence.

Another fairly common feature is that they're no good at knowing when to stop the revolution and start rebuilding.
 
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