Op Banner photos - some memories for the old and bold

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer

KnightsofRowallan

LE
Book Reviewer
Bessbrook Mill?
Spot on.

Here's another, answers on a postcard.
DSC01077.JPG
 
From which:

At least two soldiers killed at the time were 17.
From memory, those two would be two young jocks: off duty, unarmed and in civvies, honey-trapped at a disco by teenage provie tarts, and head-jobbed in some grotty tenement.

What a "glorious Republican victory over the British Army".

Cvnts.
Was talking to some USNG blokes in the NE United States few years ago, on an Exchange. One of their blokes was ex Argylls. The subject of PIRA et al came up, and we informed them of that, plus details of Slab Murphy, what happened to Jean McConville, why the buses would be burnt, the Nutting Squad, etc etc etc.

They were genuinely shocked. NORAID had done a great propaganda job.
 
In 1971, you either had to have already joined at 15/16 into Juniour Leaders or Army Apprentice College, or wait until 17.5 and join as an adult. Even then, your service for pension only began at 18, but by 18 you were adult, through basic and trade training and into your first unit.
There was also Junior Infantryman’s Wing (JIW) in Oswestry, which opened in 1971.
 
Are you sure the picture was a squaddie?

From the description, it sounds to me like one I was shown at NITAT before our 79-81 resident Bn tour.

The remains had been jigsawed (very patiently, it has to be said) back together, on a path lab post mortem table, as I remember it, each 'sausage' being uniformly square in cross section.

In life, the deceased Ulsterman had at one time been a member of the pre-Troubles SAS, who - retired from service, and back home in Belfast - sided with the 'RA. It was believed that somewhen in 71 to 73, the cheeky fvcker even infiltrated an active/occupied SF base (Woodburn Hotel?)

He wound up in bits/in the photo in Summer 1976, when the bomb he was trying to plant (next to a big town gasometer in Belfast) went off prematurely, after he'd got through the mesh perimeter fencing, but before he put the fecker in position and had it away on his toeses

Net result (there's a pun in there) was that the tank ruptured, the gas ignited - big fireball was reported by an AAC pilot flying over Armagh city, while I was patrolling in the Armagh cuds - and the cvnt was blown back through the mesh fence, which (like a potato ricer?) rendered his remains into said uniformly square 'sausage' shapes.

It's one of my favourite memories.

Karma.
 
Are you sure the picture was a squaddie?

From the description, it sounds to me like one I was shown at NITAT before our 79-81 resident Bn tour.

The remains had been jigsawed (very patiently, it has to be said) back together, on a path lab post mortem table, as I remember it, each 'sausage' being uniformly square in cross section.

In life, the deceased Ulsterman had at one time been a member of the pre-Troubles SAS, who - retired from service, and back home in Belfast - sided with the 'RA. It was believed that somewhen in 71 to 73, the cheeky fvcker even infiltrated an active/occupied SF base (Woodburn Hotel?)

He wound up in bits/in the photo in Summer 1976, when the bomb he was trying to plant (next to a big town gasometer in Belfast) went off prematurely, after he'd got through the mesh perimeter fencing, but before he put the fecker in position and had it away on his toeses

Net result (there's a pun in there) was that the tank ruptured, the gas ignited - big fireball was reported by an AAC pilot flying over Armagh city, while I was patrolling in the Armagh cuds - and the cvnt was blown back through the mesh fence, which (like a potato ricer?) rendered his remains into said uniformly square 'sausage' shapes.

It's one of my favourite memories.

Karma.

I was on patrol on the Newtownards Road at the time of the explosion. The night sky went bright brick red for a few seconds then went back to black. Had the players been successful in their murderous task, they probably would not only have taken out the resident troops based at the Markets, but also killed quite a few civilians living in the area.
 
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Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer

ACAB

LE
I spent 3 days in XMG whilst on a Nobble run. We were flown in and then the fog came down. We basically existed on cheese sarnies as the QM had told us that the Rat Packs we all carried were only for emergencies.
 
I spent 3 days in XMG whilst on a Nobble run. We were flown in and then the fog came down. We basically existed on cheese sarnies as the QM had told us that the Rat Packs we all carried were only for emergencies.
Depending on the year, a phone call to the right place would have resulted in a delivery of various meats that would make you not want to leave. We had an agreement with a local slaughterhouse, we left him alone and the selection left for collection overnight made even our ACC guys drool.
 

ACAB

LE
Depending on the year, a phone call to the right place would have resulted in a delivery of various meats that would make you not want to leave. We had an agreement with a local slaughterhouse, we left him alone and the selection left for collection overnight made even our ACC guys drool.
It was late 87.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
No food for 3 days isn't an emergency, then?
After Omagh and a couple of months converting to CVR(T), we went to UNFICYP and took over Ferrets from A Squadron Life Guards. Each had a 4-man Compo box strapped to the rear mudguard opposite the exhaust. For emergency use only.

From Ayios Nikolaus we patrolled the Green Line to Fig Tree Bay. On the way out, we passed within view of a ghost town which, my commander informed me had been Famagusta a couple of years earlier, before the war. But we couldn't stop to look because it was a sensitive part of the border (why we were patrolling it).

We got to Fig Tree Bay where coincidentally we met a pair of our own C Sqn (Cyprus Armoured Car Sqn) Ferrets in green and black. Whilst the other three chatted, I looked at the steering, which was getting rather heavy. Hmm. Not sure what I was seeing. Was there the faintest hint of toe out?

Got back to the Famagusta viewpoint and I pulled up. The steering had become unworkable. Got out and found the front wheels splayed utterly toe out. Other Ferret headed for home while we awaited Bluebell assistance. Sat and admired the ghost town, not giving a toss about being in a sensitive no-stopping zone. Made a brew.

Looked at the Compo box. Does this constitute an emergency? We broke open the box. Bluebell promptly turned up.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
After Omagh and a couple of months converting to CVR(T), we went to UNFICYP and took over Ferrets from A Squadron Life Guards. Each had a 4-man Compo box strapped to the rear mudguard opposite the exhaust. For emergency use only.

From Ayios Nikolaus we patrolled the Green Line to Fig Tree Bay. On the way out, we passed within view of a ghost town which, my commander informed me had been Famagusta a couple of years earlier, before the war. But we couldn't stop to look because it was a sensitive part of the border (why we were patrolling it).

We got to Fig Tree Bay where coincidentally we met a pair of our own C Sqn (Cyprus Armoured Car Sqn) Ferrets in green and black. Whilst the other three chatted, I looked at the steering, which was getting rather heavy. Hmm. Not sure what I was seeing. Was there the faintest hint of toe out?

Got back to the Famagusta viewpoint and I pulled up. The steering had become unworkable. Got out and found the front wheels splayed utterly toe out. Other Ferret headed for home while we awaited Bluebell assistance. Sat and admired the ghost town, not giving a toss about being in a sensitive no-stopping zone. Made a brew.

Looked at the Compo box. Does this constitute an emergency? We broke open the box. Bluebell promptly turned up.
On the subject of Famagusta, during our UN tour ( about 1970) I think) Myself an a couple of mates hired cars (Triumph Vitesse) and had 5 days R7R. We went to Famgusta, which had been a thriving place during our first tour (1962) and were horrified to see it as deserted as it was. Shops closed and with stock still in windows, car showrooms with vehs gathering dust etc. So sad. The hotels too were empty. From there we went to Kyrenia, which was quiet but still alive. Note; this was obviously before the Turkish invasion and as UN we were free to go wherever.
 
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