Op Banner photos - some memories for the old and bold

Coleraine and Portrush (Barry's?) or Portstewart were great places to visit; we never had any bother there (back and forth from L/Derry) in the early 80's. We weren't really safe anywhere but that region and its people (cracking girls) were great. Lots of good memories to balance the bad. We went out with women from Crown Heights iirc. As long as you didn't hang round the Gobnascale or go out of bounds, nobody cared.

At the 'Ports' in the summer, local women with toms in the back seats would cruise around all day. The amount of times blokes' vehicles got stuck on the sand down there though, jesus they were asking for it. But I'd live round there now myself.
I do, part of the year.
Love it, and - as you say - good folk there.
 
Ajax 2RTR were in Fort George late '77. River patrols were run by RMs in Zodiacs I think. One of our MT drivers was offered a ride with the Booties, it was a misty evening, they got separated and while trying to find each other, they collided and Pete Mills whose birthday it was disappeared. He was recovered a week later, exactly where the local fishermen said he would be.
RIP Tpr Pete Mills.
Does he mean the Foyle ?
 
Kinch, Greetings! you are a much deeper thinker than I, among your points raised, there are none that I could possibly disagree with, however It may be worth you going onto the Amazon site for the book, and to read some of the forty seven 'Reviews' on there. You will see that if the book is criticized in any way then a chap called 'Max Markham' comes on to defend the book and to 'slag off' quite nastily the review author, even to the extent of criticizing writing style the spelling and grammar. I maintain perhaps wrongly, that Max Markham may well be Alistair Kerr? Several of us on there raised this point, but 'Max' never replies. When you read the reviews, be sure to read the comments to some particular reviews, that's where you'll find him.

It was a 'dark and awful time' Kerr brings it all back with such expertise almost as if he was actually there, it is a good book that is for sure, the fact that it causes so much discussion proves this. In a year or two, I will read it again, but it will be the second edition that's just out.
I must be reading the first edition - quite a few factual errors
 
I agree with all your comments regarding Ireland and its people, however when you arrived in Londonderry at about that time our company had part of Bogside as a patch, I'm sure we would have like to have joined you on your train to Dublin!
One quite unusual sight that I saw in William St in Bogside, was a US sailor dressed in uniform full whites and casually walking through the place into the Bogside, as if nothing was going on. I thought he'd stuck his neck out, he could have been taken for British.
Was in William St last week - the transformation is quite something.
Amusing to be driving around in my father's 9 year-old hatchback, festooned with Poppy stickers !
 
Just read this today

I lost my father 16yrs ago & he was the bravest man I’ve ever known
He brought his family here to rebuild our country & spent 20+ yrs feeding the British Army
When the IRA killed his cousin to tell my dad to get out of N Ireland, my dad stayed another 10yrs

Nazis Afsal, former chief prosecutor NE England

A chapter of the troubles I knew nothing about
Mr Afzal is impressive.
I hope he has a future role in public life.
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
William St today, not a 'burnt out' house, or car, it all looks nice and prosperous, I walked on into the Bogside and stood on corners where I had stood all those years ago, the transformation was so good to see. The well-kept houses give the impression of people in employment. To the left of the image off site was a stall with some poorly clad stallholders selling stuff for the 'Cause.' Some never give up.

Spare me Just a little reminisce:
On the corner near the red painted shop, we used to stand sometime in Coy or Pl strength., the baddies usually came from the right, sometimes from both directions. We had a coy 2ic that was into Shakespeare, and in particular Henry Vth at Agincourt, of which he sometimes give us the first few verses, as follows. " Whats he that asks more men from England now, You Sir, I beg you, ask for not one man more, for if we are marked to die, then we are enough to do our country loss, but if to live, the fewer men here today, then the greater the share of honour!"
William street Sept 18.jpg
 
William St today, not a 'burnt out' house, or car, it all looks nice and prosperous, I walked on into the Bogside and stood on corners where I had stood all those years ago, the transformation was so good to see. The well-kept houses give the impression of people in employment. To the left of the image was a stall with some poorly clad stallholders selling stuff for the 'Cause.' Some never give up.

Spare me Just a little reminisce:
On the corner near the red painted shop, we used to stand sometime in Coy or Pl strength., the baddies usually came from the right, sometimes from both directions. We had a coy 2ic that was into Shakespeare, and in particular Henry Vth at Agincourt, of which he sometimes give us the first few verses, as follows. " Whats he that asks more men from England now, You Sir, I beg you, ask for not one man more, for if we are marked to die, then we are enough to do our country loss, but if to live, the fewer men here today, then the greater the share of honour!" View attachment 352878
Tracey's Bar has been there for centuries it seems to me. To the left of the vehicle in the picture and up the slope a bit and to the right is a bar 'The Spinning Wheel ?' An upstairs room accommodated PIRA meetings wherein an illustrious participant known for his intolerance to members drinking alcohol would ask a trusted barman to add a couple of shots of vodka to his orange juice.

Further up the street and to the left is a bar wherein one of our long term posters, not recently heard from, participated in a meet with former men of violence, post GFA on a reconciliation debrief. He wrote an erudite and engaging post on the meet. As a man of the town, I was seriously taken by his description of that event.
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
Tracey's Bar has been there for centuries it seems to me. To the left of the vehicle in the picture and up the slope a bit and to the right is a bar 'The Spinning Wheel ?' An upstairs room accommodated PIRA meetings wherein an illustrious participant known for his intolerance to members drinking alcohol would ask a trusted barman to add a couple of shots of vodka to his orange juice.

Further up the street and to the left is a bar wherein one of our long term posters, not recently heard from, participated in a meet with former men of violence, post GFA on a reconciliation debrief. He wrote an erudite and engaging post on the meet. As a man of the town, I was seriously taken by his description of that event.
Can you point me to the 'long term poster's' write up of the meeting? Also there was a very good man during the 72/73 period. He lived near the Bogside Inn, he had a very large mustache and wore a super large trilby hat, he was part of the Bogside Association and helped greatly to defuse some situations. I think his first name was 'Vinny' I wondered if he was still about?
 
William St today, not a 'burnt out' house, or car, it all looks nice and prosperous, I walked on into the Bogside and stood on corners where I had stood all those years ago, the transformation was so good to see. The well-kept houses give the impression of people in employment. To the left of the image off site was a stall with some poorly clad stallholders selling stuff for the 'Cause.' Some never give up.

Spare me Just a little reminisce:
On the corner near the red painted shop, we used to stand sometime in Coy or Pl strength., the baddies usually came from the right, sometimes from both directions. We had a coy 2ic that was into Shakespeare, and in particular Henry Vth at Agincourt, of which he sometimes give us the first few verses, as follows. " Whats he that asks more men from England now, You Sir, I beg you, ask for not one man more, for if we are marked to die, then we are enough to do our country loss, but if to live, the fewer men here today, then the greater the share of honour!" View attachment 352878
I have spent many hours there usually praying for rain.
 
Can you point me to the 'long term poster's' write up of the meeting? Also there was a very good man during the 72/73 period. He lived near the Bogside Inn, he had a very large mustache and wore a super large trilby hat, he was part of the Bogside Association and helped greatly to defuse some situations. I think his first name was 'Vinny' I wondered if he was still about?
Allow me to get back. I 'm out of town. :)
 
Tracey's Bar has been there for centuries it seems to me. To the left of the vehicle in the picture and up the slope a bit and to the right is a bar 'The Spinning Wheel ?' An upstairs room accommodated PIRA meetings wherein an illustrious participant known for his intolerance to members drinking alcohol would ask a trusted barman to add a couple of shots of vodka to his orange juice.

Further up the street and to the left is a bar wherein one of our long term posters, not recently heard from, participated in a meet with former men of violence, post GFA on a reconciliation debrief. He wrote an erudite and engaging post on the meet. As a man of the town, I was seriously taken by his description of that event.
Was it the late Marty, with the sneaky vodkees?
 
Excuse my ignorance, I spent all my career playing in the sand so this is my first time looking into all this. Absolutely fascinating, you guys have brought it to life perfectly, I hadn't realised how bad it was. Are my eyes playing tricks on me or is that an MBT in the background?

Screen Shot 2018-09-19 at 12.40.30.png
Screen Shot 2018-09-19 at 12.40.30.png
 
Excuse my ignorance, I spent all my career playing in the sand so this is my first time looking into all this. Absolutely fascinating, you guys have brought it to life perfectly, I hadn't realised how bad it was. Are my eyes playing tricks on me or is that an MBT in the background?

View attachment 352950 View attachment 352950
It's your eyesight old boy - it's a CENT AVRE - Operation Motorman?
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
Excuse my ignorance, I spent all my career playing in the sand so this is my first time looking into all this. Absolutely fascinating, you guys have brought it to life perfectly, I hadn't realised how bad it was. Are my eyes playing tricks on me or is that an MBT in the background?

View attachment 352950 View attachment 352950
Yes 'Operation motorman' in Bogside to remove some longstanding manned barricades, but as I remember the tanks were painted white for that op. I spent a long time in the province but never saw 'cowboy stuff' like that GPMG fellow wearing Belted rounds about his body.
 
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