Op Banner photos - some memories for the old and bold

Loved the view of Scotland from Tor Head
If that the Northeastern extremity, and the view across is to the great tongue of Scotland that has Campbelltown at its Southern tip, I've seen it from the opposite direction, from the bedroom window of a farmhouse at Tarbert, where we were (very boozy) guests of a delightful Ulsterman farmer.

R.I.P. Frank, you were a fine host.
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
Northern Ireland is beautiful though. Between 1968 and 1972 I visited RoI and NI 4 times. Back then the Dollar was strong, the Pound was cheap and it was a great. Good for an American student. I recall beer being a half-crown in cheap places and 3 bob in others. My time in NI in 1972 was short however. I arrived at dawn on Monday Jan 31, 1972 in Larne on the ferry. Thing were a bit tense due to events in Derry so I changed plans and took the first train I could get to Dublin.

After that I decided NI was not a great vacation spot for an American, especially after I acquired a wife and then a son. Why vacation where there is shooting and bombing. I did recall the beautiful scenery and people who were nice to tourists. Last summer for my 70th birthday my son took me to RoI and NI, staying at quite posh hotels in both countries. The trip was great and I am very happy that peace has returned to NI. Once again impressed by the people and the scenery. Loved the view of Scotland from Tor Head in Antrim. Only problem at Tor Head was a bit of a traffic jam.

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I agree with all your comments regarding Ireland and its people, however when you arrived in Londonderry at about that time our company had part of Bogside as a patch, I'm sure we would have like to have joined you on your train to Dublin!
One quite unusual sight that I saw in William St in Bogside, was a US sailor dressed in uniform full whites and casually walking through the place into the Bogside, as if nothing was going on. I thought he'd stuck his neck out, he could have been taken for British.
 
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ugly

LE
Moderator
Northern Ireland is beautiful though. Between 1968 and 1972 I visited RoI and NI 4 times. Back then the Dollar was strong, the Pound was cheap and it was a great. Good for an American student. I recall beer being a half-crown in cheap places and 3 bob in others. My time in NI in 1972 was short however. I arrived at dawn on Monday Jan 31, 1972 in Larne on the ferry. Thing were a bit tense due to events in Derry so I changed plans and took the first train I could get to Dublin.

After that I decided NI was not a great vacation spot for an American, especially after I acquired a wife and then a son. Why vacation where there is shooting and bombing. I did recall the beautiful scenery and people who were nice to tourists. Last summer for my 70th birthday my son took me to RoI and NI, staying at quite posh hotels in both countries. The trip was great and I am very happy that peace has returned to NI. Once again impressed by the people and the scenery. Loved the view of Scotland from Tor Head in Antrim. Only problem at Tor Head was a bit of a traffic jam.

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Why are you on the wrong side of the road? Also putting welsh porn on here is a bit naughty!
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
I asked a south Armagh farmer once why they didn't have sheep as it was ideal country for sheep. He laughed and said dogs were a problem. I cant imagine where those feral mutts came from! If you spent any time in largely Protestant farming areas you saw sheep and lots of them, maybe they tolerated feral dogs less?
 
I agree with all your comments regarding Ireland and its people, however when you arrived in Londonderry at about that time our company had part of Bogside as a patch, I'm sure we would have like to have joined you on your train to Dublin!
One quite unusual sight that I saw in William St in Bogside, was a US sailor dressed in uniform full whites and casually walking through the place into the Bogside, as if nothing was going on. I thought he'd stuck his neck out, he could have been taken for British.
That bit about the sailor is interesting. I recall reading (in David Barzilay’s British Army in Ulster I think) about the arrests after a riot somewhere in the Province. One of them was US Navy sailor.
 
To be honest the local news in NI was better for troubles watching than mainland news, after a while the phrase "Another soldier dies" becomes a bit meh for the main news. It affected us on the mainland when family were involved or when the IRA had a go on the mainland.
Its not that we didn't care we just didn't get the chance to.
Must admit as a Cumbrian it was all a bit distant. I had an eye opener when I moved to the Isle of Man.
I had a cottage on the outskirts of the old Andreas airfield and after the ITN news of an evening usually watched border crack and deek about. ( headlines mrs smalle from caber’s cat has gone missing)
One day strong winds had moved my roof Ariel around and low and behold Ulster’s version sprung into view.The same vaguely shoestring tv station look
Made the almost mundane reporting of kneecapping abductions and finding of body’s even more shocking.
Half of the locals must have been mad as hatters before it kicked off and its little wonder most of the rest were unhinged a little by living through the ( normalised) madness.
I’ve met some grand ulstermen but if I’m honest I don’t stay any longer than I have to on Buisness.
 
That bit about the sailor is interesting. I recall reading (in David Barzilay’s British Army in Ulster I think) about the arrests after a riot somewhere in the Province. One of them was US Navy sailor.
Falls Rd in '91 (I think), I was on foot patrol and doing the usual 'find a doorway to kneel in' routine, when a coach load of people turned up, de-bussed, hurled a load of verbal about the Brutush Ormay being baby killers or some nonsense and started taking posed phots with me/us in the back ground. Turns out they were all septics on holiday in the UK, who were guests of SF and doing a tour of West Belfast.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Honestly though if we had had the electricity to watch a TV during the decade of industrial strife I'm sure it would have told us that the electricity was due to go off.
More important things going on at the time than bigots burning each others houses down!
 
Although not a photo, there was a video shown on the NIRT course that always brought a smile. I wish I could find a copy

The scene is of a line of protesters facing off a line of police behind riot shields. A young woman steps forward towards the police. Two of the riot shields part and a police officer sticks his head out. The woman smiles and holds up a flower to the police officer. The officer looks down at the flower and then wacks the lass over the head with a riot baton.
I remember that, I'm sure the copper was John Cleese.
 
I agree with all your comments regarding Ireland and its people, however when you arrived in Londonderry at about that time our company had part of Bogside as a patch, I'm sure we would have like to have joined you on your train to Dublin!
One quite unusual sight that I saw in William St in Bogside, was a US sailor dressed in uniform full whites and casually walking through the place into the Bogside, as if nothing was going on. I thought he'd stuck his neck out, he could have been taken for British.
At that time Clooney Barracks was still a USN base and off duty US sailors in uniform wouldn't have been that unusual a thing for the locals.
 
At that time Clooney Barracks was still a USN base and off duty US sailors in uniform wouldn't have been that unusual a thing for the locals.
I saw a yank walking through Harrogate in his full khaki class A(if that is what they call it).
It seems strange that the yanks had a base in NI at that time.Does anyone know when it closed?
 
I saw a yank walking through Harrogate in his full khaki class A(if that is what they call it).
It seems strange that the yanks had a base in NI at that time.Does anyone know when it closed?
1977. It was a communications base. When we closed it some of the civi staff that had been there since the USN moved out starting telling people massive pits had been dug where the Americans had buried vehicles, weapons and all sorts. They also claimed there was a huge underground bunker that had been bricked up.

The searches found sod all (left by the Americans anyway) and the 'bunker' turned out to be a tiny cellar. We were very disappointed.
 
The thread is titled 'Photos' not for three badge budgies bumping their gums .....
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