Opération Serval - Mali.

A British exchange officer (ex-29 Cdo RA I suppose) is currently deployed with Op Barkhane. It is his second tour there.

Currently deployed as part of Operation Barkhane as a planner at the Inter-Armed Theater Command Post (PCIAT) in N'Djamena, Lieutenant-Colonel Paul is a British artilleryman. He has served since 2017 in the 3rd Division of the Army, as part of the Franco-British Lancaster House agreement .

More info here:



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Is his shirt tucked in ?

...Ill get me coat...
 
A British exchange officer (ex-29 Cdo RA I suppose) is currently deployed with Op Barkhane. It is his second tour there.

Currently deployed as part of Operation Barkhane as a planner at the Inter-Armed Theater Command Post (PCIAT) in N'Djamena, Lieutenant-Colonel Paul is a British artilleryman. He has served since 2017 in the 3rd Division of the Army, as part of the Franco-British Lancaster House agreement .

More info here:



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He reminds me a bit of Fred Flintstone.
 
Strong smell of urine around his final resting place, no doubt.
 
At least 23 Malian soldiers killed during an attack on a Malian camp yesterday

RIP


 
At least 23 Malian soldiers killed during an attack on a Malian camp yesterday

RIP


Bugger. Poor sods.
Are we looking at a talented enemy or a complacent army here ?
These setbacks can lead to demand for more sophisticated weaponry which inevitably falls into the hands of the enemy.
 
Bugger. Poor sods.
Are we looking at a talented enemy or a complacent army here ?
These setbacks can lead to demand for more sophisticated weaponry which inevitably falls into the hands of the enemy.
The local armed forces are under strength and have a leadership problem. For years they were under-funded and under-trained as well trained armies in those regions invariably mean a coup.

The tours of duty in operational areas are very long and the troops are not sufficiently supported. A lot of the kit they buy, or receive through foreign aid does end up in the hands of the enemy.

Their enemy on the other hand are very mobile, only regroup before attacking and apply terror tactics to force the population of their AOs to either leave altogether or submit and support them. They require little support and are very good to play on local and regional fracture lines to enroll support. They are very motivated, mostly by local issues, not a global jihad, and want their government to pay for years of frustration and bad governance
 
The local armed forces are under strength and have a leadership problem. For years they were under-funded and under-trained as well trained armies in those regions invariably mean a coup.

The tours of duty in operational areas are very long and the troops are not sufficiently supported. A lot of the kit they buy, or receive through foreign aid does end up in the hands of the enemy.

Their enemy on the other hand are very mobile, only regroup before attacking and apply terror tactics to force the population of their AOs to either leave altogether or submit and support them. They require little support and are very good to play on local and regional fracture lines to enroll support. They are very motivated, mostly by local issues, not a global jihad, and want their government to pay for years of frustration and bad governance
If that's the case and its just local issues, isn't it just best to leave them to it as opposed to wasting more Western lives and treasure. TIA and all that. Especially after a lot of Western economies are going to be f****d after COVID-19?
 
If that's the case and its just local issues, isn't it just best to leave them to it as opposed to wasting more Western lives and treasure. TIA and all that. Especially after a lot of Western economies are going to be f****d after COVID-19?
Because a) we’ll be needing resource from around there (both on-shore oil and minerals) and b) Afghanistan c2000 is a perfect example of why leaving unsecured areas of the ground is not a good thing...
 
Because a) we’ll be needing resource from around there (both on-shore oil and minerals that the Chinese don't already own and b) Afghanistan c2000 is a perfect example of why leaving unsecured areas of the ground is not a good thing...
 
Yes I was gone for a few years. Being confined has helped the return ! Thank you for the kind words

Ref. the current Ops in the Sahel they are of course, like all Ops, full of lessons but I don't know how long this will last. I am quite worried that COVID will have lasting effects on French foreign Ops as all ministries will be scrambling for money, as well as on a number of African Governments that will find it very difficult to whistand the shock.

If you have a couple of minutes, read that....

Not good reading for those of a nervous disposition. More migrants heading for Europe, a small note in the UK press other than COVED noted about 100 crossed from France to UK in boats this weekend. Still being provided with boats and fuel even with France in lockdown.
 
If that's the case and its just local issues, isn't it just best to leave them to it as opposed to wasting more Western lives and treasure. TIA and all that. Especially after a lot of Western economies are going to be f**
That could happen quicker than we think. At the end of 2019, Macron has authorized a surge in troops and equipment after a series of EIGS attacks across the region that killed 100s of troops in Mali, Niger and Burkina Faso (BF). In late 2019, BF was on the brink of total collapse, with jihadists carrying out attacks in the vicinity of the capital and the whole North of the country virtually out of Gvt's control.

People who follow the region think that Macron's plan is to do as much as a clean sweep as possible and then to claim "mission completed" (rings a bell?), hand over to the locals with international support and bring most of the troops back to France in time for the 2022 presidential elections in France.

By then the French direct involvement will have gone on for almost 10 years, with 10s of billions of Euros spent and, as we speak today, 42 French servicemen killed.

This one was before COVID wrought havoc on the world economies...with Op Barkhane costing about 600 million euros a year, I believe there will be a lot of calls to reduce its scale and to close it ASAP. The Left will of course pit against each other the cost of foreign operations and the need for an overhaul of the French public health system to the often heard tune of "more hospitals and less Rafale"
 
A 110 pages report on the construction of the USAF Air base in Agadez, Niger which was at one point, IIRC, the largest USAF construction project in the world. Its main task is to support ISR operations in this part of the African continent as well as a hub for logistic flows. Op Barkhane is among the main recipient of the US ISR effort in the area.

Basically, the report says that things were not done properly and that the whole project was finally delivered 3 years too late and at double the price

Findings

We determined that USAFRICOM and the Air Force did not effectively plan, design, and construct Air Base 201 in Niger to provide airfield and base support infrastructure in support of USAFRICOM operations.


 
According to the beginning of this report (the rest being behind a paywall) Denmark will provide helicopters to TF Takuba.


Denmark is already providing 2 EH-101s ISO Op Barkhane and 1 C-130J ISO MINUSMA


 
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The EU has gifted Malian internal security forces (police, gendarmerie, garde nationale) with 49 motorcycles.
Motorcycles are the ground mobility vehicle of choice for terrorists in the Sahel area because they are so much easier to hide from ISR assets than SUVs and technicals.

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5 months ago, the EU had given 8 boats to patrol the Niger river

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And a year ago, the EU gave the Bamako Gendarmerie riverine unit a patrol boat

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After its successful deployment within the SF helicopter regiment (4°RHFS), the ALAT (FRA AAC) has decided to convert about 20 Gazelle SA342 into gunships equipped with a Dillon M-134D Minigun in 7,62 mm.

I know that in the UK, armed Gazelle immediately conjure images of the 2 RM Gazelle downed during the San Carlos landing with heavy loss of lives but in the conditions of the Sahel, the Gazelle is providing sterling service at a fraction of the cost of other gunships.

It has thus been decided to extend the SF experiment to conventional ALAT units.

At least 2 SA342L1, formerly equipped with AATCP AAMs will also be equipped with a forward firing 20 mm cannon. There used to be Gazelle with 20 mm cannons before in the ALAT but only on older airframes, the SA341, that were phased out several years ago.

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