"OORAH & Semper-Fi" .

Discussion in 'US' started by U.S.M.C, May 10, 2009.

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  1. Author is Tom Beck not me...
    For my family, Semper Fidelis is more than a fancy slogan. It is truly a way of life. My father retired from the Marine Corps in the 90s, after serving over twenty years and more than one tour of duty in a combat zone. Therefore, my two brothers and I grew up in a culture that demanded excellence and loyalty of its members, and it showed. It is partially for this reason, I am convinced, that we all joined the Marine Corps when we were of the appropriate age. Because of my upbringing, it is somewhat difficult to imagine what life would be like, had I not grown up surrounded by living, breathing personifications of "Semper Fidelis," and I am increasingly beginning to realize that I do not understand the mindset of those who had not. It is this realization that led me to reflect on the history of the phrase, and speculate the reason it holds such weight with the members of the Marine Corps..
    The first thing I questioned was the Latin thing. Why not simply make the slogan "Always Faithful," since that is what the Latin phrase literally means? More people would certainly understand it. Apparently, whenever someone has something important to say, he translates it to Latin, and that lends the phrase credibility and respectability.

    E Plurbus Unum. Pro bono. Carpe Diem. Mea Culpa. Sic Semper Tyrannus. The phrases are a part of our culture, but not native to our language. Unless we have been taught what they mean separately from our education in English, we would have no idea. I would wager that Semper Fidelis means more to those who use it than just about any other Latin phrase in use today.

    Customarily, though, Latin has also been the language of law. Habeus Corpus, Stare Decisis, and Per Curium are terms one commonly would come across if he did only a precursory exploration of legal decisions. Even the United States adopted the practice of using Latin in its written Constitution, in spite of the desire to create a Constitution that could be easily understood by common people, who typically could not read and write Latin. However, America was a special case. The people had already been governing themselves for some time before the revolution. Unlike today, now that apathy reigns, participation in local politics was almost necessary for survival. That atmosphere of social and political cooperation was one that was replete with Latin phrases. America was unique--set apart from the other countries--for just that reason. It was a province that was governed by the people, not kings--and its people would not relinquish that tradition without a fight.

    When doctors started translating ailments into Latin-Greek hybrids, they were criticized for creating a language that only doctors could understand. Of course, that was partly the point. It set apart those who could understand from those who could not--thus both signifying the value that doctors provided as well as creating a group of people who could identify one another by their similar values and education.

    The use of Latin in the Marine Corps motto is not bred from a very different motivation. Of course, the Marine Corps has never experienced a mutiny. Marines in England were revered for their loyalty to the crown, just as United States Marines are now revered for their downright fanatical dedication to each other, their service, and their country. Using Latin to characterize this quality represents its legitimization--its codification. Significantly, for Marines at least, it also provides a caste--a group that is separate and unique from any other--a group that has no desire to be like any other.

    “It is not
    negotiable.
    It is not
    relative, but
    absolute.”What is left unsaid in the motto is also notable. The phrase is "Always faithful." It isn't "Sometimes Faithful." Nor is it "Usually Faithful," but always. It is not negotiable. It is not relative, but absolute. Who is always faithful, though. and to what, exactly are they faithful? Interestingly, the simplicity of the phrase and the calculated neglect to specify its parameters seems to strengthen it. Marines pride themselves on their straightforward mission and steadfast dedication to accomplish it. Things do not need to be spelled out for them; they know what it means and what to do about it.

    Even though Marines are known to swell with pride from time to time (they do, after all, have a noble legacy to continue), they are not snobbish. Even the use of Latin must make them uncomfortable, because they shorten an already-short motto to the more colloquial "Semper Fi." This does not misrepresent the phrase; it simply symbolizes the ability of common people to become part of a brotherhood that demands more of its members than any other comparable group in the world.

    The longer I am out of the service, the more I recognize my draw to and longing for the culture of "Semper Fidelis." I suspect that reading this will impart nothing significant to Marines, as they already are aware of their glorious charge. It is my earnest hope, however, that it may help others understand the reason Marines hold the Corps in such high esteem. All those references by former Marines, in their new jobs, to "back when I was in The Corps," will begin to make a little more sense. Marines are imbued with Semper Fidelis, and all it means, and because they lived it for so long, they have difficulty accepting any less from others.

    Semper Fi!

    The origin of the word "OO-RAH" has been a subject of frustration and dispute over the years. U.S. Marines were the word's first proprietors, using it to express contentment or to set expectations. And although use-dependent, the word OO-RAH can take on a variety of meanings. Now after languishing in military jargon obscurity for decades, it has rapidly become much more commonly known as even civilians associate its use with Marines.
    The spelling of the word has never been standardized, as is often the case with phonetic interpretations of a sound that can only be properly formed at the bottom of the lungs. Variant spellings include "OORAH," "OOHRAH," and "OOH-RAH." However it is spelled, it is recognizable as distinctly Marine whether spoken or written, and it can easily be distinguished from the Army version, the venerable but significantly less motivating "HOO-AH."

    On one of the many training videos I had to endure as a Marine, a major in Service "C" uniform was speaking to a bunch of elementary school kids. Never one to particularly enjoy watching these videos when much more important work was waiting to be done, I was at least amused by the approach. Within a course of minutes, the major got the kids' attention and obedience in a manner reminiscent of boot camp, where upon hearing the command "EYEBALLS!" sixty recruits would lock their eyes on the drill instructor and say, in unison, "SNAP!" Amusingly, the major went on to deadpan, "Marines do not cheer. Marines do not clap. When a Marine is pleased, he says, 'Aarugha.'" From that point on, whenever he called for an affirmative response, the children would yell at the top of their lungs, "AARUGHA!" I don't even remember why I had to watch that video, but I'll always remember that major and his group of elementary school kids or as my dad would call them, "future Marines."

    Of course, an astute reader would note the lack of a "G" in "OO-RAH," and I also had this thought. However, as it turns out, there appears to be some connection between the familiar battle cry of a Marine and the deep klaxon alarm of a submarine. According to several sources, including Lcpl Paul Hirseman (2004), writing for the Marine Corps website:

    Marines and historians have determined the true origins of "Oorah" lie with recon Marines stationed in Korea in 1953. During this time, reconnaissance Marines in the 1st Amphibious Reconnaissance Co., found themselves traveling via submarine to where they were needed. The memorable call of "dive, dive!" would be called on the intercom and a klaxon alarm, which made a very distinct "Aarugha" sound, would announce the descent of the sub below water.

    The recon Marines, who heard this sound often, started using it as a motivational tool during runs and physical training. Over time, the word "Aarugha" came to be too much of a mouthful, and eventually molded itself into the familiar "Oorah," according to Maj. Gary Marte, a retired Marine. [source]

    Having grown up as a Marine brat and being given the unique opportunity to watch my two older brothers join the Corps before me, I was well acquainted with the term before I joined. I originally thought it could only mean that the person saying it was highly motivated to be a Marine, as I heard it most often after the "Star Spangled Banner" finished playing before a movie at a base theater. Since then, I have seen it used as a replacement for "Aye, Aye," as a greeting, and to announce the presence of Marines, such as when the Corps is mentioned to a mixed audience. To further demonstrate the indefatigable utility of OO-RAH,
    OO_RAH..
     
  2. I normally leave this kind of response to others better suited; but please do ******* off and bore somewhere else old chap.
     
  3. rampant

    rampant LE Reviewer Book Reviewer

    I did try to warn you....
     
  4. Bored now.

    Bye............



    NB : Nowhere in your post do you explain "OORAH".

    OORAH off.
     
  5. We already know what "Semper Fidelis" menas, but WTF does "OORAH" mean ????
     
  6. This is our part of the forum buddy!!
    If you dont like it i suggest you dont read it.
    I also strongly recommend that you read the forum rules before you start on your insults.
    Anyhow its 23.45 and its time to catch some zee's i would love to stay and chat but im way too tired.
    Take care guys stay safe..
    Semper-fi.
     
  7. rampant

    rampant LE Reviewer Book Reviewer

    Still doesn't explaiin the meaning of "OORAH"[hr][hr][hr]
     
  8. L/Pte Jones slowly wakes up.............

    ........erm.....this is because he is a mong........zzzzzzzzzzzzzzz.
     
  9. This is also by Sam Beck....
    The origin of the word "OO-RAH" has been a subject of frustration and dispute over the years. U.S. Marines were the word's first proprietors, using it to express contentment or to set expectations. And although use-dependent, the word OO-RAH can take on a variety of meanings. Now after languishing in military jargon obscurity for decades, it has rapidly become much more commonly known as even civilians associate its use with Marines.
    The spelling of the word has never been standardized, as is often the case with phonetic interpretations of a sound that can only be properly formed at the bottom of the lungs. Variant spellings include "OORAH," "OOHRAH," and "OOH-RAH." However it is spelled, it is recognizable as distinctly Marine whether spoken or written, and it can easily be distinguished from the Army version, the venerable but significantly less motivating "HOO-AH."

    On one of the many training videos I had to endure as a Marine, a major in Service "C" uniform was speaking to a bunch of elementary school kids. Never one to particularly enjoy watching these videos when much more important work was waiting to be done, I was at least amused by the approach. Within a course of minutes, the major got the kids' attention and obedience in a manner reminiscent of boot camp, where upon hearing the command "EYEBALLS!" sixty recruits would lock their eyes on the drill instructor and say, in unison, "SNAP!" Amusingly, the major went on to deadpan, "Marines do not cheer. Marines do not clap. When a Marine is pleased, he says, 'Aarugha.'" From that point on, whenever he called for an affirmative response, the children would yell at the top of their lungs, "AARUGHA!" I don't even remember why I had to watch that video, but I'll always remember that major and his group of elementary school kids or as my dad would call them, "future Marines."

    Of course, an astute reader would note the lack of a "G" in "OO-RAH," and I also had this thought. However, as it turns out, there appears to be some connection between the familiar battle cry of a Marine and the deep klaxon alarm of a submarine. According to several sources, including Lcpl Paul Hirseman (2004), writing for the Marine Corps website:

    Marines and historians have determined the true origins of "Oorah" lie with recon Marines stationed in Korea in 1953. During this time, reconnaissance Marines in the 1st Amphibious Reconnaissance Co., found themselves traveling via submarine to where they were needed. The memorable call of "dive, dive!" would be called on the intercom and a klaxon alarm, which made a very distinct "Aarugha" sound, would announce the descent of the sub below water.

    The recon Marines, who heard this sound often, started using it as a motivational tool during runs and physical training. Over time, the word "Aarugha" came to be too much of a mouthful, and eventually molded itself into the familiar "Oorah," according to Maj. Gary Marte, a retired Marine. [source]

    Having grown up as a Marine brat and being given the unique opportunity to watch my two older brothers join the Corps before me, I was well acquainted with the term before I joined. I originally thought it could only mean that the person saying it was highly motivated to be a Marine, as I heard it most often after the "Star Spangled Banner" finished playing before a movie at a base theater. Since then, I have seen it used as a replacement for "Aye, Aye," as a greeting, and to announce the presence of Marines, such as when the Corps is mentioned to a mixed audience. To further demonstrate the indefatigable utility of OO-RAH,
     
  10. rampant

    rampant LE Reviewer Book Reviewer

    John Fashanu on Gladiators 1990s :D
     
  11. SIR! Why did you change the heading of the thread, SIR! Are you confused, SIR! Are you from Oklahoma, SIR!



    OK, which way is south? If I tab fast enough I can make it over the border by dawn...
     
  12. Insults? Oh princess, you are funny.

    That was advice, the insults are still being worked on by those who will further the battle of wits with you.

    Chaps - do be gentle, he's lightly armed.

    Watch and shoot.....watch and shoot....
     
  13. Well, thanks mightily for the info pardner, very very interesting.

    Can I introduce you to a saying that was prevalent in my Regiment of the British Army?

    "PUFO"
     
  14. ... and there was me thinking it was the sound of people puking in the shitter! 8O :lol:
     
  15. Gentlemen please! U.S.M.C. is merely trying to explain the US military psyche to us, and instead of wasting time writiung down his own thoughts on the matter, he has chosen to use the time honoured 'Cut and paste' method.

    I think if you all had a little think you'd know where 'oorah' came from. It was Mannfred Mann.

    Don't you remember "There she was just a walkin' down the street, singing oorah-diddy-diddy-dum-diddy-doo"