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One rule for us, another for them?

#1
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/4027545.stm

Police chief car caught at 97 mph

A chief constable has been criticised after his car was reportedly caught speeding at nearly 100 mph on the M1.
Derbyshire Chief Constable David Coleman, a staunch anti-speeding campaigner, was being driven by a chauffeur when the vehicle was stopped.

Traffic officers in Hertfordshire reportedly clocked the car doing 97mph as Mr Coleman returned from London.

Derbyshire Police confirmed a car carrying the chief had been stopped for a "road traffic offence".

Safety cameras

"This is a serious speeding offence and one for which someone could expect an outright ban," said an RAC spokesman.

"Even though the chief constable wasn't driving, we expect public figures to set a good example.

"They are the ones involved in promoting road safety and to be involved in a speeding offence clearly doesn't send a positive message to the public."

The police chief was returning to his county after an engagement in London at the time of the incident.

Mr Coleman's force was one of the first in the country to create a Safety Camera Partnership.

It uses police, court and local authority resources to install extra speed cameras in an attempt to reduce road deaths.

Tough stance

On Friday the team exhibited a stand at Birmingham's National Exhibition Centre, displaying a motorbike badly damaged in a collision to shock car users.

However, the chief constable's tough stance has incensed some motorists, with one man convicted of repeated attacks on local speed cameras.

A Derbyshire Police spokeswoman said: "The car was driven by a member of Derbyshire Police staff and the passenger was the chief constable.

"The matter is now being dealt with by Hertfordshire Police."
The word t'osser comes to mind. Would be interesting to see the outcome of this case :?
 
#3
I doubt that it will be got away with it's already been placed in the public eye.

But it won't be Coleman who gets done he'll just say he was asleep or something (To preserve his good name as if he had been aware he would have informed the driver to reduce his speed :lol: :lol: ) and screw the guy who was jiffed to drive him it's that poor Git I feel sorry for but only slightly knowing that he would screw any of us for the slightest thing we did wrong.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
#4
armourer said:
All he,Derbyshire Chief Constable David Coleman, has to do is say he has converted to Islam and he'll get off.
:lol: :lol: :lol:

Careful !

You'll have the PC Kommissars round your basha to transport you to off a re-education camp !
 
#5
bed_surfer said:
I doubt that it will be got away with it's already been placed in the public eye.

But it won't be Coleman who gets done he'll just say he was asleep or something (To preserve his good name as if he had been aware he would have informed the driver to reduce his speed :lol: :lol: ) and screw the guy who was jiffed to drive him it's that poor Git I feel sorry for but only slightly knowing that he would screw any of us for the slightest thing we did wrong.
Sorry, but whilst agreeing Coleman should be setting the right example by telling his driver not to speed, ultimately the driver himself is clearly at fault and must be punished accordingly. The "I was only obeying orders" line of defence didn't work for the post-war Nazis and shouldn't do so in this instance either.
 
#6
[quote="Ethel_the_Aardvark
Sorry, but whilst agreeing Coleman should be setting the right example by telling his driver not to speed, ultimately the driver himself is clearly at fault and must be punished accordingly. The "I was only obeying orders" line of defence didn't work for the post-war Nazis and shouldn't do so in this instance either.[/quote]

That said, the driver would obviously be aware of the attitude of his VIP passenger. More likely he was told to put his foot down. Who'd be guiltier then?
 
#7
claymore said:
Ethel_the_Aardvark said:
Sorry, but whilst agreeing Coleman should be setting the right example by telling his driver not to speed, ultimately the driver himself is clearly at fault and must be punished accordingly. The "I was only obeying orders" line of defence didn't work for the post-war Nazis and shouldn't do so in this instance either.
That said, the driver would obviously be aware of the attitude of his VIP passenger. More likely he was told to put his foot down. Who'd be guiltier then?
It's happened before on a speed camera and they got away with it because they couldn't tell who was driving. As this a 'stop' it might be a little more difficult to get away with it. Tmk, it's the driver who gets done. Accordingly, the Chief Const should bite the bullet and pay the fine. Driver'll still get three points though.
 
#8
Surely the Chief Constable is guilty under police discipline of something along the lines of failing to prevent an offence being commited whilst on duty?
 
#9
If the vehicle was being used for a police purpose the Road Traffic Act may not apply.

In which case the driver may be "not guilty."

Intersting to see two county forces traffic depts fight this one out. :D

Trotsky
 
#10
If the vehicle was being used for a police purpose the Road Traffic Act may not apply.

In which case the driver may be "not guilty."

Intersting to see two county forces traffic depts fight this one out. :D

Trotsky
 
#11
Oddly enough -

WELLINGTON (Reuters) - Six people, including five police officers, who allegedly drove the New Zealand Prime Minister at high speed so she could attend a rugby test match have been charged with traffic offences, police said on Friday.(12/11/04)
Prime Minister Helen Clark came under fire after members of the public complained that her motorcade broke speed limits so she could attend a rugby test match between New Zealand and Australia in July.

Police say the motorcade took 96 minutes to cover the 206 kilometre (128 mile) journey from the South Island town of Waimate to Christchurch, from where Clark flew to Wellington for the rugby game.

The open road limit in New Zealand is 100 km per hour (62 mph), and 50 kph (31 mph) in towns.

Following a police inquiry, six people involved in the motorcade have been charged with driving in a dangerous manner, Assistant Police Commissioner Peter Marshall said in a statement. Several other traffic charges have also been laid.

The six are due to appear in court on December 14,
For her part the PM said she was 'unaware of the speed as she was busy working in the back seat'

It will be interesting to see what comes out of the court cases as to who gave the word to get Hellon Earth on to the airport.
 

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