On This Day In History....in here for your military themed anniversaries - big and small

Let's start with a biggie -

On this day , 30th April 1945, due to sudden lead poisoning, animal lover, vegetarian, amateur artist and early advocate for European unification Adolf Hitler was suddenly taken from us. Remembered by his neighbours for his love of travel, no nonsense attitude and killer fashion sense, Adolf found love late in life with Eva where they enjoyed many happy seconds of marital bliss before she died after ingesting a rogue pint of Blue Nun.

Adolf will perhaps be best remembered for providing producers of television programmes the opportunity to endlessly speculate on his death or whether in fact he retired to Argentina via submarine full of gold to raise albino alpacas and living to be 153.

 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
Can't have too many This Day In History threads
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
if it wasn't for der Fuhrer there's be noting telly at all.

there should be statues and parades in his honour.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
if it wasn't for der Fuhrer there's be noting telly at all.

there should be statues and parades in his honour.
den Führer. For takes the accusative.
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
May 1st,1863Battle of Chancellorsville begins in Virginia

1898At Manila Bay in the Philippines, the U.S. Asiatic Squadron destroys the Spanish Pacific fleet in the first battle of the Spanish-American War.
 
40 years ago to this very day patriotic Britons across the nation rejoiced when it was announced that after an eight day attempt on a building in Knightsbridge, the crack regiment of the SAS entered the Guiness Book Of Records for the greatest number of people on a balcony at one time.

One of those brave men who took part Cpl 'Lefty' Wright said

"I remember it like it was yesterday. I had just completed the 22 SAS selection course where I obtained the highest marks they'd ever given for blanket-folding when I got the call. Immediately my training kicked in and I jumped into my MKII Cortina, pausing only to buy 20 B&H and pick up my best SAS mates, Jonesy, Jock, Taff, Chalky, Ginger, Paddy, Smiffy, and Spaz, along with a dozen Gurkas secretly hidden in the boot who allowed us to use their foreskins to abseil down onto the balcony from the helicopter. I can't talk too much about it as I signed the Official Secrets Act and the MOD put a microphone in your head so they can listen to your thoughts. Let's just say we did what needed to be done.

Sadly, due to his operational commitments Private Wright's bravery has not yet been recognised by the authorities.

"They wanted to give me the George Cross for it, but I was in deep cover at the time conducting surveillance on a possible terrorist network at my ex-wife's house and couldn't take the time off."

Prime minister Margaret Thatcher said at the time "No one can deny Britain's Georgian era external balustrades and enclosed platforms are second to none when it comes to standards of load bearing".

 
May 5th-

1864The forces of Union General Ulysses S. Grant and Confederate General Robert E. Lee clash in the Wilderness, beginning an epic campaign.

1942 – Japanese troops land on Corregidor.

1945In Lakeview, Oregon, Mrs. Elsie Mitchell and five neighborhood children are killed while attempting to drag a Japanese balloon out the woods.
 
40 years ago to this very day patriotic Britons across the nation rejoiced when it was announced that after an eight day attempt on a building in Knightsbridge, the crack regiment of the SAS entered the Guiness Book Of Records for the greatest number of people on a balcony at one time.

One of those brave men who took part Cpl 'Lefty' Wright said

"I remember it like it was yesterday. I had just completed the 22 SAS selection course where I obtained the highest marks they'd ever given for blanket-folding when I got the call. Immediately my training kicked in and I jumped into my MKII Cortina, pausing only to buy 20 B&H and pick up my best SAS mates, Jonesy, Jock, Taff, Chalky, Ginger, Paddy, Smiffy, and Spaz, along with a dozen Gurkas secretly hidden in the boot who allowed us to use their foreskins to abseil down onto the balcony from the helicopter. I can't talk too much about it as I signed the Official Secrets Act and the MOD put a microphone in your head so they can listen to your thoughts. Let's just say we did what needed to be done.

Sadly, due to his operational commitments Private Wright's bravery has not yet been recognised by the authorities.

"They wanted to give me the George Cross for it, but I was in deep cover at the time conducting surveillance on a possible terrorist network at my ex-wife's house and couldn't take the time off."

Prime minister Margaret Thatcher said at the time "No one can deny Britain's Georgian era external balustrades and enclosed platforms are second to none when it comes to standards of load bearing".

And caused the interruption of a perfectly good John Wayne film that I was watching on BBC2 (oh, and the World Snooker final on BBC1).

ITV, of course, waited until Coronation Street finished before going to over to the siege, although they did cut off the end credits.

The operation only succeeded because the terrorists were watching the socially realist drama on ITV, and not the imperialist American movie nor the capitalist sporting (!) event on the bourgeois imperialist channels.
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
On this day, 22 May 1915, Britain's worst train crash happened at Quintinshill just outside Gretna. The crash involved an express train going to Glasgow and a troop train carrying half a battalion of 7th Royal Scots on their way to Liverpool for shipping out to Gallipolli

228 people died in that crash.


Of the 498 all ranks on the troop train only 67 were on their feet and able to answer the roll later that morning.

The funeral was held just a couple of days later in Rosebank Cemetery, Pilrig, Edinburgh (Or Leith as it was then) where over 100 bodies were buried together. Many of them unrecognisable.

A sad day still remembered by the Regiment each year on the Saturday closest to the date. That would have been tomorrow in normal times but this year all we have is permission for a wreath layer and our Association Padre to make the commemoration. The rest of the Regimental family will be have another 'virtual remembrance' at 11am tomorrow when we will, in our own locations, take a moment to remember.

Ironically, the second half of the battalion carried on and embarked for Gallipolli where, nearly 5 weeks later, they were slaughtered on the Gallipoli peninsula.
 
Officially opening the event that will continue for 30 years.

'The First Battle of St Albans, fought on 22 May 1455 at St Albans, 22 miles (35 km) north of London, traditionally marks the beginning of the Wars of the Roses in England.

'The first battle of St Albans was relatively minor in military terms, with fewer than sixty killed from approximately 5,000 combatants. But politically this was a complete victory for York and the Nevilles: York had captured the king and restored himself to complete power, while Somerset and the Nevilles' northern rivals Henry Percy, Earl of Northumberland and Lord Clifford all fell during the rout. Among the wounded were Buckingham, Thomas de Courtenay, Earl of Devon, Jasper Tudor (half-brother of the king), and Somerset's son Henry Beaufort, Earl of Dorset. The sudden attack by and bravery of the 26-year-old Earl of Warwick began his famous military career and would lead to his reputation as "the Kingmaker".

'The next day, York escorted King Henry back to London; York was appointed as Protector of England by the Parliament a few months later.'


 
On this day, 22 May 1915, Britain's worst train crash happened at Quintinshill just outside Gretna. The crash involved an express train going to Glasgow and a troop train carrying half a battalion of 7th Royal Scots on their way to Liverpool for shipping out to Gallipolli

228 people died in that crash.


Of the 498 all ranks on the troop train only 67 were on their feet and able to answer the roll later that morning.

The funeral was held just a couple of days later in Rosebank Cemetery, Pilrig, Edinburgh (Or Leith as it was then) where over 100 bodies were buried together. Many of them unrecognisable.

A sad day still remembered by the Regiment each year on the Saturday closest to the date. That would have been tomorrow in normal times but this year all we have is permission for a wreath layer and our Association Padre to make the commemoration. The rest of the Regimental family will be have another 'virtual remembrance' at 11am tomorrow when we will, in our own locations, take a moment to remember.

Ironically, the second half of the battalion carried on and embarked for Gallipolli where, nearly 5 weeks later, they were slaughtered on the Gallipoli peninsula.
This bloke is normally pretty good on things like this.

 

goodoldboy

MIA
Book Reviewer
28 May 1982 The Battle of Darwin / Goose Green

Overview: The Battle of Darwin / Goose Green was an engagement between British and Argentine forces on 28 and 29 May 1982 during the Falklands War. Located on East Falkland's central isthmus, the settlement of Goose Green was the site of an airfield. Argentine forces were in a well-defended position, within striking distance of San Carlos Water, where the British task force had made its amphibious landing. The outcome was a victory for the British but was notable for the loss of Lt Col H Jones of 2 Parachute Regiment while leading his troops. He was subsequently one of two posthumous recipients of the Victoria Cross, the highest British award for valour.
 
29 May 1453 - the end of the siege of Constantinople, the fall of the Byzantine Empire and the end of an era.

'The Fall of Constantinople (Byzantine Greek: Ἅλωσις τῆς Κωνσταντινουπόλεως, romanized: Hálōsis tēs Kōnstantinoupóleōs; Turkish: İstanbul'un Fethi, lit. 'Conquest of Istanbul') was the capture of the Byzantine Empire's capital by the Ottoman Empire. The fall of the city took place on 29 May 1453, the culmination of a 53-day siege which had begun on 6 April 1453.

'The attacking Ottoman army, which significantly outnumbered Constantinople's defenders, was commanded by the 21-year-old Sultan Mehmed II (later called Mehmed the Conqueror), while the Byzantine army was led by Emperor Constantine XI Palaiologos. After conquering the city, Sultan Mehmed made Constantinople the new Ottoman capital, replacing Adrianople.

'The Fall of Constantinople marked the end of the Byzantine Empire, and effectively the end of the Roman Empire, a state which dated back to 27 BC, lasting nearly 1,500 years.[3] The capture of Constantinople, a city which marked the divide between Europe and Asia-Minor, also allowed the Ottomans to more effectively invade mainland Europe, eventually leading to Ottoman control of much of the Balkan peninsula.

'The conquest of Constantinople and the fall of the Byzantine Empire[4] was a key event of the Late Middle Ages which is sometimes considered the end of the Medieval period.[5] It was also a watershed moment in military history. Since ancient times, cities and castles had depended upon ramparts and walls to repel invaders. However, Constantinople's substantial fortifications were overcome with the use of gunpowder, specifically in the form of large cannons and bombards.

'Mehmed II granted his soldiers three days to plunder the city, as he had promised them and in accordance with the custom of the time.[18]:145[51] Soldiers fought over the possession of some of the spoils of war.[52]:283 The women of Constantinople also suffered from rape at the hands of Ottoman forces.[53] According to the Venetian surgeon Nicolò Barbaro, "all through the day the Turks made a great slaughter of Christians through the city". According to Philip Mansel, widespread persecution of the city's civilian inhabitants took place, resulting in thousands of murders and rapes and 30,000 civilians being enslaved or forcibly deported.[2]

'The looting was extremely thorough in certain parts of the city. Four days later on 2 June, the Sultan would find the city largely deserted and half in ruins; churches had been desecrated and stripped, houses were no longer habitable and stores and shops were emptied. He is famously reported to have been moved to tears by this, speaking "What a city we have given over to plunder and destruction."


 
On this day in history, 29th May 1940, Corporal Thomas Sole of the 4th Bn Royal Berkshire Regiment was killed whilst waiting for evacuation from the beaches of Dunkirk.

In civilian life Cpl Sole was employed in the commercial department of Allied Newspapers. He was photographed on his last day of civil employment, saying goodbye to his Mum in Shoreditch, London and later during his basic training at Arborfield Barracks where he met War Minister, Leslie Hore-Belisha.

He is buried at Zuidchote Churcyard in Belguim.

Photos courtesy of NewsUK Archives & TracesOfWar.

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AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
Despite what we'll doubtless soon read in BB's annually repeated 'raise a glass' thread, the liberation of Europe did not begin with the glider landings at Pegasus Bridge, but many months earlier with Op BAYTOWN in September 1943. On 4 June 1944, Rome became the first European capital city to be liberated by Alan Whicker.

Rome was declared open. News correspondent Alan Whicker raced into Rome with his team, in a Jeep.

Meanwhile Gen Mark Clark ignored orders to put a German Corps to the sword, and allowed them to escape. Instead, he and his entourage raced for Rome and glory.

Only to meet Whicker on his way out.
 

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