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On shoring or re-investing in UK industry

In the People's Republic of China no doubt. How much semiconductor production is in the West? What semiconductors are made in Britain these days?

There are some aspects of semiconductor technology and things like Digital Signal Processing that are subject to export controls.



Who is Roderick Spode?


A creation of P.G.Woodhouse, a pompous mosley-esque thug, 7th earl of Sidcup, a character in the Jeeves and Wooster series of novels, In secret, the owner of a women's up market lingerie emporium, a nasty piece of work, with delusions of grandeur.
 

Yokel

LE
IBM didn’t get big on the back of selling computers into the American public sector. Quite the opposite; US public bodies were as tardy in adopting IT as British ones. The US public sector had the same disease of introducing complex, bespoke systems. And you wouldn’t find computers in US schools any earlier than in the UK; probably later.

IBM (and the other US tech giants) for big selling into the US entrepreneurial culture, particularly in the buzzing states like California. The UK simply didn’t have that culture in the 80s and even the 90s. By then it was too late.

There is light. Ocado could well become the UKs first global tech giant. Long overdue.

What became of Logica?

Way too much UK capital is tied up in static assets, particularly real estate. And way too much of that real estate is security against debt.

That said, the UK is a relatively easy place to raise capital. If your idea has a short cash burn period and expects to deliver returns quickly, you’ll get funds. But long R&D periods, high infrastructure investment needs etc etc make manufacturing less attractive to investors.

Somewhere in my old University notes I have a graph of the levels of effort made during the duration of a project. It compared a US company with a Japanese one. The Japanese would hard and steadily with only a small increase in effort towards the delivery date, but the US counterpart put less effort in for most of time, but ramped it up as the delivery date approached.

What cultural factors favour short term thinking and a firefighting approach to management?
 

happyuk

War Hero
The media don’t help. The biggest enemy of the British worker has always been the British press. Always doing us down in some way or another, subtly or otherwise, foreign workers always being better, cheaper, more efficient etc.
 
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happyuk

War Hero
What became of Logica?



Somewhere in my old University notes I have a graph of the levels of effort made during the duration of a project. It compared a US company with a Japanese one. The Japanese would hard and steadily with only a small increase in effort towards the delivery date, but the US counterpart put less effort in for most of time, but ramped it up as the delivery date approached.

What cultural factors favour short term thinking and a firefighting approach to management?
Another point is that Japanese management tend to have everything figured out before starting a project.
 

Yokel

LE
Another point is that Japanese management tend to have everything figured out before starting a project.

Yes traditional Western management, at least in the English speaking world, seems to be to ignore potential problems and hope that they will resolve themselves, and then to panic at the last minute and firefight issues that could have been avoided.

For any manufactured product most of the manufacturing costs are fixed in the design. Additionally any slippage in delivery eats into profitability.
 
Don't you start doing down British management in your subtle or otherwise way.
British management don't need anyone to do them down, they can manage it exceptionally well on their own IMHO.
 
A bit old, but still worth a read.


So far my own company has considered outsourcing. All we’ve done now is educated the mongs in charge about new technology and highlighted that outsourcing is one option. How about a bit of investment in automation so we can be more cost effective than the cheaper labour.
 
I don't speak for Arrse - But.

The over reliance on Globalisation has been brought sharply into focus by both B***t and Covid.

The UK now has a perfect opportunity to put in place a strategy to bring all that you listed ( and more ) back to the UK. If the UK needs it, the UK should be producing it.

There will always be exceptions. Certain foodstuffs for example

A wonderful opportunity is just waiting to be launched. All it needs is the collective heads of Government and business to be banged together until the message sinks in.
Return on investment.
 
There are some who are very, very good.
...and their efforts come to naught due to the vast majority of management not being able to find their own posteriors with both hands or wanting to make any kind of wave so as to highlight their incompetence.
 
There are some who are very, very good.
Interesting fact for you that I learnt when I went back to school after I came out.

Less than 4% of all managers in the U.K. have received any formal training to be a manager.

I was invited along to a key speaker lecture by some influential alumni at a university I was going to.

One speaker who was very high up in a certain bank came into talk about leadership. Who was also an ex EOD officer. He gave the audience a talk that was little more than the Sandhurst pocket guide to leadership .

Speaking to him later, he explained that he found that in his own experience (and mine) that there’s only the emergency services and the Military that train it’s people for command positions .( obviously, some utter cretins get through but I’ve always put that down to politics, not the system at fault.)

This is the issue in civi strasse. People end up getting promoted beyond their capabilities
 
Interesting fact for you that I learnt when I went back to school after I came out.

Less than 4% of all managers in the U.K. have received any formal training to be a manager.

I was invited along to a key speaker lecture by some influential alumni at a university I was going to.

One speaker who was very high up in a certain bank came into talk about leadership. Who was also an ex EOD officer. He gave the audience a talk that was little more than the Sandhurst pocket guide to leadership .

Speaking to him later, he explained that he found that in his own experience (and mine) that there’s only the emergency services and the Military that train it’s people for command positions .( obviously, some utter cretins get through but I’ve always put that down to politics, not the system at fault.)

This is the issue in civi strasse. People end up getting promoted beyond their capabilities
Which is exactly why, when I got to a certain level, I turned down all offers of promotion. I'd seen too many climb that greasy pole, only to fail utterly in their new, elevated position. Be good at your job. not rubbish.
 
Interesting fact for you that I learnt when I went back to school after I came out.

Less than 4% of all managers in the U.K. have received any formal training to be a manager.

I was invited along to a key speaker lecture by some influential alumni at a university I was going to.

One speaker who was very high up in a certain bank came into talk about leadership. Who was also an ex EOD officer. He gave the audience a talk that was little more than the Sandhurst pocket guide to leadership .

Speaking to him later, he explained that he found that in his own experience (and mine) that there’s only the emergency services and the Military that train it’s people for command positions .( obviously, some utter cretins get through but I’ve always put that down to politics, not the system at fault.)

This is the issue in civi strasse. People end up getting promoted beyond their capabilities
A former fellow officer went on to head up, very successfully, a large international IT company.
When one of us lesser mortals asked him how on earth he was qualified for such a position, and what was it like, he just said ‘using the same principles as commanding a troop or a squadron - but on a greater scale’.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
Interesting fact for you that I learnt when I went back to school after I came out.

Less than 4% of all managers in the U.K. have received any formal training to be a manager.

I was invited along to a key speaker lecture by some influential alumni at a university I was going to.

One speaker who was very high up in a certain bank came into talk about leadership. Who was also an ex EOD officer. He gave the audience a talk that was little more than the Sandhurst pocket guide to leadership .

Speaking to him later, he explained that he found that in his own experience (and mine) that there’s only the emergency services and the Military that train it’s people for command positions .( obviously, some utter cretins get through but I’ve always put that down to politics, not the system at fault.)

This is the issue in civi strasse. People end up getting promoted beyond their capabilities
I once sat over dinner and watched a very forceful but well-natured discussion between two individuals. One was an advocate of the come-up-from-the-work-floor school of thinking, the other was of the bring-someone-competent-in-directly-at-the-executive-level school.

There are merits to both but I do agree that specialist subject knowledge doesn't make you an expert on all things.* There are those who can translate good technical knowledge into good commercial decisions. There are those who are best off being very trusted advisers, and no more.

There's also training and personality.

I can think of a commercial organisation that I worked with (not for) that had a very dynamic leader and a very capable number two/executive officer. The leader was promoted and sent abroad, and the number two was promoted into his place. And he was hopeless; he was very good at realising what he was asked to do (and a very nice guy to boot) but he wasn't a CEO. He left.

The sad thing is, a competent HR set-up (an oxymoron in itself) should have identified that and not ended up embarrassing both the company and a thoroughly decent individual.




*Racing driver and race relations spring to mind.
 
A former fellow officer went on to head up, very successfully, a large international IT company.
When one of us lesser mortals asked him how on earth he was qualified for such a position, and what was it like, he just said ‘using the same principles as commanding a troop or a squadron - but on a greater scale’.
I think a lot of ex officers might be using different principles.
 
What became of Logica?

Not sure if that is a question or a statement.

If the former then, as a former employee, I can tell you that Logica was acquired by the Canadian company CGI eight years ago.

Then raped and pillaged.
 

happyuk

War Hero
Don't you start doing down British management in your subtle or otherwise way.

In my working life I have had maybe two or three managers that I could say were genuinely talented.
The one standout one died while on a cycling trip.
The other 20 or so were your typical self serving bell-ends and charlatans riding the support of the people they were supposed be looking after.
 

Yokel

LE
Yesterday the Guardian was claiming that COVID-19 and BREXIT would result in the manufacture of consumer goods returning to the UK. The sectors they mentioned were food, fashion, homeware, and DIY products.

At the same time we need to protect intellectual property and drive exports. We need to reduce the dependence on the retail sector as a source of employment.
 

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