Oldest Kit still in general use....

Heavy Girder Bridge: On the 3 May 45 the railway bridge over the River Oste at Hechthausen in Germany was destroyed and would have been reinstated by Royal Engineers Army Troops and it is still exists today, seeking to confirm which unit built it, the railway from Hamburg to Cuxhaven was double track, however became single track before and after this bridge, Deutsche Bahn now intend to upgrade the line from Stade to Cuxhaven with overhead electrification and believe this bridge will be replaced.
Except that’s not a Heavy Girder Bridge.

HGB was a panel bridge; a giant Bailey. Panels were joined by pins and the panels had welded joints. Your bridge has riveted sections making up a continuous truss. HGB entered service in the 50s IIRC.

I believe the oldest equipment bridge still in use is the Inglis bridge at the entrance to Vauxhall plains in Monmouth. Still maintained by the MOD, it’s WW1 vintage.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Er... Not quite true Uggers ol' chap. Good King 'Enery mkVlll had breech loaders on Mary Rose. The back of the gun had a removable chamber, in which the charge was placed. Once loaded the chamber was held in place by wedges. There is an example at the Tenby Museum.
The Navy of the the time also used breech loading swivel guns.
But with the change in foundery technology, they fell out in favour of muzzle loaders.
Still not used at Waterloo though, Vauxhall or clapham junction maybe but not Waterloo
 
Er... Not quite true Uggers ol' chap. Good King 'Enery mkVlll had breech loaders on Mary Rose. The back of the gun had a removable chamber, in which the charge was placed. Once loaded the chamber was held in place by wedges. There is an example at the Tenby Museum.
The Navy of the the time also used breech loading swivel guns.
But with the change in foundery technology, they fell out in favour of muzzle loaders.
I have seen one of those rear load cannons, wooden wedge was used to hold the thing together,
 
This kind of thing, part of it came off the back it was the back you charged, then put it back with a wedge I would not like to be around it when it did go off
 

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This kind of thing, part of it came off the back it was the back you charged, then put it back with a wedge I would not like to be around it when it did go off
I'll bet real medieval gunners didn't work this fast... ;-)

 
Except that’s not a Heavy Girder Bridge.

HGB was a panel bridge; a giant Bailey. Panels were joined by pins and the panels had welded joints. Your bridge has riveted sections making up a continuous truss. HGB entered service in the 50s IIRC.

I believe the oldest equipment bridge still in use is the Inglis bridge at the entrance to Vauxhall plains in Monmouth. Still maintained by the MOD, it’s WW1 vintage.
It was put up in 1931. Is that the Vauxhall Plains that used to have a bridging camp on it? Did an AT exercise there in 1985!
 
Except that’s not a Heavy Girder Bridge.

HGB was a panel bridge; a giant Bailey. Panels were joined by pins and the panels had welded joints. Your bridge has riveted sections making up a continuous truss. HGB entered service in the 50s IIRC.

I believe the oldest equipment bridge still in use is the Inglis bridge at the entrance to Vauxhall plains in Monmouth. Still maintained by the MOD, it’s WW1 vintage.
Last I heard it was no longer open to vehicle traffic due to lack of maint, so in use but only for pedestrian traffic.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Waterloo was quarter past 6 and breechloading artillery wasnt invented until much later in the day say nearly 7 o'clock even then we went back to rifled muzzle loading for a while
Er... Not quite true Uggers ol' chap. Good King 'Enery mkVlll had breech loaders on Mary Rose. The back of the gun had a removable chamber, in which the charge was placed. Once loaded the chamber was held in place by wedges. There is an example at the Tenby Museum.
The Navy of the the time also used breech loading swivel guns.
But with the change in foundery technology, they fell out in favour of muzzle loaders.
Fair one regarding invention, I wouldn't class it as breech loading more suicidal. However I should have written
"Waterloo was quarter past 6 and breechloading artillery wasnt in use at Waterloo and not regularly till much later in the day say nearly 7 o'clock even then we went back to rifled muzzle loading for a while "
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Except that’s not a Heavy Girder Bridge.

HGB was a panel bridge; a giant Bailey. Panels were joined by pins and the panels had welded joints. Your bridge has riveted sections making up a continuous truss. HGB entered service in the 50s IIRC.

I believe the oldest equipment bridge still in use is the Inglis bridge at the entrance to Vauxhall plains in Monmouth. Still maintained by the MOD, it’s WW1 vintage.
So any idea what bridge it is?
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
The bridge conversation brought to mind the Elan village suspension and Bailey bridges. Seems the Bailey bridge is only 31 years old, but I found this interesting anyway.

A 100-year-old suspension bridge that provides access to a remote mid Wales village will not be taken down after its owners decided it was too historically important.
The Elan Village suspension bridge crosses the river Elan about 0.5 km downstream of Caban Coch dam.
It was built by the Birmingham Water Corporation to provide access to the worker's village during the construction of the reservoir complex in the late 19th Century.
But the bridge has been closed to vehicles and pedestrians since 1988 because it was deemed too dangerous to use.



The historical significance of this bridge has long been recognised and we will continue to work with all parties to ensure a viable future for this river crossing



Welsh Water


Since then, a temporary bridge built alongside it has maintained access to the 20 or so houses at Elan village.
And now Powys Council has adopted the bailey bridge as a public highway which means that all public rights over the suspension bridge will be removed.
Hang on, is it a baily bridge bodged onto the original suspension bridge deck?
Either way its more than 30 years old and less than 100
 
So any idea what bridge it is?
Not sure; there were several heavy railway bridge designs used in late WW2. Bery few were equipment bridges; Bailey couldn’t carry railway loads and flexed too much.

It’s not an equipment bridge. It’s a pretty standard steel truss through bridge built in kit form, riveted and welded in situ. It couldn’t be recovered and used again.
 

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