Old Guards film

Datsun 120Y

Old-Salt
Cheers, I love stuff like this.

3rd Gren?
 

exspy

LE
I found this whilst idly wandering about the web. Could be interesting. http://www.movieunclaimed.com/

The Vietnam War MIA who is the subject of this film was shown to be a fake long ago. In spite of this, it's apparently an entertaining story. But don't believe that this guy lived, undiscovered, in Vietnam for 45 years before being 'accidentally' found by a visiting American Vietnam vet. More details can be found here:

http://www.armchairgeneral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=135427&highlight=unclaimed

Cheers,
Dan
 
The Vietnam War MIA who is the subject of this film was shown to be a fake long ago. In spite of this, it's apparently an entertaining story. But don't believe that this guy lived, undiscovered, in Vietnam for 45 years before being 'accidentally' found by a visiting American Vietnam vet. More details can be found here:

http://www.armchairgeneral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=135427&highlight=unclaimed

Cheers,
Dan
Thanks for that!

Living in Vietnam as I do, I couldn't help wondering about the story. I have worked on the Ho Chi Minh trail in some pretty remote areas, e.g. the area between Lak Sao in Laos and the Vietnam border https://www.google.com/maps/place/L...2!3m1!1s0x313bd51d79c54483:0x776c50ddb251a3b1 which is just a jumble of jungle covered mountains. However despite the remoteness of these places, nothing goes unseen and the existence of a bloke "lost from the war" would soon be known unless they were being kept as a secret slave or something.

I have come across the US MIA department in Laos, Vietnam and the Solomons too and they are a bit paranoid about secrecy, to the extent that if you send them an email from a non US govt source, it is usually rejected. Which was a bit of a bugger when we found a stiff and wanted them to come and collect it. But anyway they seem to know the whereabouts of all their live missing people
 
Or you could just go on You Tube and search for the film title?
 
Afghan Andy was complaining the link didn't work.
 
Thanks for that!

Living in Vietnam as I do, I couldn't help wondering about the story. I have worked on the Ho Chi Minh trail in some pretty remote areas, e.g. the area between Lak Sao in Laos and the Vietnam border https://www.google.com/maps/place/Lak Sao, Laos/@18.1956605,104.9776512,3027m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m2!3m1!1s0x313bd51d79c54483:0x776c50ddb251a3b1 which is just a jumble of jungle covered mountains. However despite the remoteness of these places, nothing goes unseen and the existence of a bloke "lost from the war" would soon be known unless they were being kept as a secret slave or something.

I have come across the US MIA department in Laos, Vietnam and the Solomons too and they are a bit paranoid about secrecy, to the extent that if you send them an email from a non US govt source, it is usually rejected. Which was a bit of a bugger when we found a stiff and wanted them to come and collect it. But anyway they seem to know the whereabouts of all their live missing people
Is there much left of the Ho Chi Minh Trail , or has it all reverted back to the jungle . I have just re-read John DelVecchio's "13th Valley" which is factually based and describes certain parts of the trail as well constructed all weather roads under a canopy of trees lashed together , with bunker complexes that would rival Bastion .
BTW : Did the Casualty people collect the KIA ?
 
Is there much left of the Ho Chi Minh Trail , or has it all reverted back to the jungle . I have just re-read John DelVecchio's "13th Valley" which is factually based and describes certain parts of the trail as well constructed all weather roads under a canopy of trees lashed together , with bunker complexes that would rival Bastion .
BTW : Did the Casualty people collect the KIA ?

Indeed in many places it was very well constructed, and it should be remembered that the Ho Chi Minh trail was actually a network of roads, tracks, trails, tunnels and waterways, in some places 80km wide. Initially some parts of the trail were nothing more than goat trails through the jungle and some were existing tracks and rough unmetalled roads. And it wasn't just a route, there were staging posts, ordnance depots, camps, air strips and hospitals.The road from Vientiane to Lak Sao and thence to the Vietnam border was part of the trail.

I used to drive that road every couple of weeks from Lak Sao to Vientiane and back - a 6 to 8 hour drive, the fastest I ever did it was 4 hours 30 mins, but in perfect conditions and only once.

Anyway the road from Vientiane (route 13) is pretty straightforward, but after turning east onto route 8 at Vieng Kham, the road soon gets progressively more difficult and mountainous, especially after Houay Mong. I imagine that the road over the mountains from there on was nothing but a trail during the war, all the way to the Vietnam border, but now it is a well used, albeit narrow and torturous tarmac road from to Vietnam. The jungle covered mountains on either side are also good places for some of the hill tribes (which were loyal to the US during the war and in some cases still are) to launch the very occasional attack on tourists, with the odd murder and kidnapping adding to the adventure of driving the route.

There are many choke points along the road and one in particular, about 30 km from Lak Sao used to make my skin crawl. From the east the road drops down a long slope, heading through a small valley only a few hundred metres wide, the entrance and exits to the valley are gaps in low, craggy, jungle covered mountains of about 100 meres wide. Coming from the Vientiane side you enter the valley along a narrow road and cross a small bridge over a rushing torrent of mountain water. Immediately after the bridge you are in the tiny valley, which must have been a lake millions of years ago as it is perfectly flat bottomed. The valley is now given to rice fields in which there are bomb craters, big bomb craters - from 2000lb bombs at a guess. The valley must have been a staging post for Vietcong/NVA and perhaps a stores depot for war stores being brought into mid-Vietnam.

I could never drive through there without imagining the carnage that must have ensued with the bombing raids. The valley was so small that a single 2000lb bomb would have covered the entire valley bottom with fragmentation.

The incoming aircraft had some very fancy navigating to do to find the small valley hidden in thousands of square miles of jungle covered mountains. And once there they had to skim the mountain tops taking AA fire and then drop into the valley and within a second or two, release their bombs, pulling g's to get out of the valley before hitting the mountains on the other side.

And from the size and locations of the bomb craters, it could be seen that the chance of surviving the attack were virtually zero, especially since the attack would have been followed up with a delivery of sub munitions.

Our teams were dealing with over a thousand sub munitions a year along that road as well as bombs and other stuff, so it can be readily imagined that with a failure rate of between 8 and 14%, the whole road from the mountains to the Viet border must have been saturation bombed.

On the eastern side of Lak Sao, heading for the Viet border, there is much evidence of the use of defoliants and the mountains either side of the road for a kilometer or two are still denuded of jungle. And here also is a valley of death where, local people told me, 30,000 people had died in bombing raids.

There is little evidence of all this now, unless you go looking for it - and you know what you are looking for, but the road is a major route now carrying buses full of Viet tourists, huge trucks carrying illicit hardwood, and trading vehicles as well as drugs, humans being trafficked, dogs destined for Viet cooking pot, thieves, pimps etc.

Of course many of the thousands of small tracks and trails which constituted the Ho Chi Minh Trail have now disappeared or reverted back to being animal tracks. But quite a few, like the road through Lak Sao have become well used roads.

The US MIA people go to Laos fairly regularly to check reports of downed aircraft and human remains, traveling to some of the most inaccessible places on the planet.

As for Yoshimoto, as we named him, whom we found in the Solomons: he was found in a filled in Japanese air defence trench at the side of the runway at Munda air strip. We handed his remains over to a Jappy chappy from the Japanese embassy.

Here he is - or what is left of him:
Yoshimoto.jpg

Alas poor Yoshimoto ......
 
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Fascinating stuff . Presumably the younger generation don't know much about the war ?
I've also read that all the old American firebases have all been picked clean of every metallic or usable object , so returning vets have great difficulty in even finding them .
Apparently veterans going back to Hill 937 ( Hamburger Hill ) are often taken to the wrong hill by lazy guides who cannot be bothered with the longer trek , so it's recommended they take copies of military maps to check they are at the right location .
 

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