OIL RIGS

Cheers for the advice, the company ill be working for seem pretty good and just can't wait to get started. Don't really understand all the seaman's allowance etc yet, if I'm honest I've never heard of it.

Would definitely help others out, really appreciate the help I've had from this and other sites. Have spent quite a while inboxing folk about how I landed this job.

Also by the looks of things ill still be needing help and advice along the way.
 
Cheers for the advice, the company ill be working for seem pretty good and just can't wait to get started. Don't really understand all the seaman's allowance etc yet, if I'm honest I've never heard of it.
Best bet there is to ask your payroll department in the first instance - if they're organised they should look after all that for you anyway.

Keep all boarding passes, luggage tags, get your discharge book signed off each time and try to pick up a foreign receipt or two going out and coming back - the more evidence you've been outside the 12-mile limit, the better.

(I'm assuming that you're going ROV on vessels, not rigs/platforms, with all this. Doesn't count on a "fixed installation.")
 
It will be a mixture of vessel and rig as far as I no, not sure of the ratio thought. I'll get a diary and document everything I do.

I'm sure we will be briefed on all of this when we start.

If not I might be giving you a shout on here.

I've heard of the 12 mile zone, I'll do some research into it and have just received my seaman's card through the post.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
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For some reason or other Master F is interested in working in the Oil Industry. His timing sucks but seems they are still taking on apprentices.

Anyhow he has been invited for aptitude tests Monday 6th April at OPITO In Portlethan,

He doesn't seem to have any information what these tests involve, any clues available?
 
For some reason or other Master F is interested in working in the Oil Industry. His timing sucks but seems they are still taking on apprentices.

Anyhow he has been invited for aptitude tests Monday 6th April at OPITO In Portlethan,

He doesn't seem to have any information what these tests involve, any clues available?
What does he fancy doing
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
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Subsunk

War Hero
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OPITO are looking for basic numeracy, verbal reasoning and scientific understanding - ie is he going to keep up with the academic demands of the onshore apprenticeship college phase. If he gets through those tests (which tend to be the biggest stumbling blocks, given how dumbed-down education is becoming - no offence to today's kids, but they are often set up to fail by an indifferent system) then he'll come back for an interview.

I've not seen the aptitudes, but I've done several apprentice interviews. They're looking for a stable personality who can cope with the offshore working environment and who has a bit of leadership potential about him or her. The best apprentices are now being looked at closely for being rapidly advanced to supervisor level as soon as they can. If he's got any team sports/Duke of Edinburgh Award Scheme/Cadet Force experience then he'll be able to hold his own.

From what I've seen, the oil and gas apprentice needs to be pretty self-motivated. If they fall in with a good shift and mentor, they will learn loads and have a postive experience. If they end up with a load of crusty old has-been militants, they can end up demotivated and marginalised. In the case of the latter, they need to grip their own destiny by changing shifts or putting the hours in to qualify in spite of their shift.

Jobs at the end of the pipeline are limited right now, so for our current apprentices, they are in direct competition for the same improver's position. I think that by the time your lad has qualified, we will be back into a period of stability - make it clear to him that this boom-bust cycle is part of the job. People are either buying Audis or gassing themselves in them so the smart oil worker plans for the lean times.

It's all a bit dodgy right now (I'm planning for the worst case and looking at fallback options right now myself) but if he gets a place it's worth taking up - good operators are always in short supply, and if he can't get offshore straight away, going to uni and qualifying as a process engineer or something similar, with the hands-on offshore experience, will set him up nicely.
 
How are things looking from the various perspectives of offshore Arrsers?

Is it all doom n gloom for the next few years, or a temporary down turn that will pick up?
 
It's dead on its arse. Project managers in this office are twiddling their thumbs and not even getting invites to tender. And this is one of the bigger players in the survey industry.
 
It's dead on its arse. Project managers in this office are twiddling their thumbs and not even getting invites to tender. And this is one of the bigger players in the survey industry.
Pretty much the feeling I'm getting.

Still get people asking me to get them a job as well 8O
 
How are things looking from the various perspectives of offshore Arrsers?

Is it all doom n gloom for the next few years, or a temporary down turn that will pick up?
The NDT side of things here in Norway have died a death for now. Having said that, anyone who has worked in Norway during the holiday season knows that the whole country comes to a virtual standstill!!

There are a couple of rig jobs coming up after the summer though....one in Stavanger (Maersk, I think), then Bergan and Hammerfest as far as I know. Most projects have been shelved and only urgent maintainance is being carried out.

It`s difficult to call here, because as mentioned, the country grinds to a halt during July/August.
 
We've just laid off a few lad's from my department but we've got work coming out of every orifice until Christmas so I don't understand the cull that's going on here with Baker Norway.

We also have a Hiring ban on so fingers crossed that'll be lifted , unfortunately we've been bringing in folk from other locations to fill the gaps for the time being .

Its not so much Doom and gloom just .... gloom !
 
a bit of a thread Resurrection, as i used the information here to look for work back in 2011,

how are those still in doing now?
im 6 years into Drilling ops Maintenance managment , and things are picking up again slowly..
 
Started in 2007, when I first left the army. I’ve always worked for drilling companies on semi’s and jack ups, with a few platform jobs here and there.

Recession bit in 09 and I ended up back in, and on Herrick.

Demobbed 2011 just as things rapidly picked up offshore again.

All good till around 2015 when it went all Pete Tong again. I was working as an Assistant Crane Op for Transocean, after Roughnecking for about 3 years. The rig I was on went from being on a $450k s day contract to getting towed to Turkey and turned into scrap metal. Was a savage downturn.

I still managed to pick up a lot if work with the agencies and had a really busy 2016.

I’ve just demobbed again, after a UN Tour in Africa, and heading back offshore this week with Ensco.

Things seam to be really picking back up again, since renewing my medical and putting myself back out there I’ve had the agencies on the phone a lot. Got offered 6 jobs in one day last week.

Will make money while I can, until the next down turn comes along (and it will).

Amazing how a multi million dollar industry relies solely on the price of a barrel of the black stuff that fluctuates so easily or is manipulated by oil cartels and the like.

I transferred my skills to onshore work and gained CPCS quals along with an NVQ and Ive rarely been out of work if im honest. Handy as a back up when the offshore game is quiet. Seams to be plenty of work up and down the country if you are willing to travel and put the hours in.

So, returning offshore after riding out 2 recessions. I think a lot of the older lads have rapped it in and won’t return offshore. Similarly, a lot of lads have found jobs elsewhere and are settled (or rehabilitated lol) and will be very reluctant to give up a steady job to go back offshore for the boom and bust lifestyle. Then there are daft cnuts like myself that will go anywhere to make a few quid.

I’ll see how it goes.
 
its not been an easy ride to say the least,
i have been terminated twice, but within a week been back under contract with the same company, so i have realized its part of the process..
since 2012 ive done Commissioning Engineer, MEA training Supervisor, QHSSE-T manager for Libya, and worked in Russia for the last 3 years in the Maintenance department and now doing Performance and integrity work.. so no-one can say ex-forces arn't flexible ...
I targeted the Land drilling side of things to ensure longevity, but was nearly caught out as well due to cutbacks, but the light at the end of the tunnel seems to be getting brighter, and manpower is getting short. biggest discussion is do we re- hire the folk we made redundant, as they were mostly the poor performers or last in the door.. so i guess we will see how things roll out over the next few months..
 
Interesting observation with the shortage of manpower.

The downturn is a good way to get rid of a lot of dead wood, and there was a hell of a lot of dead wood stealing a wage in the North Sea.

On the flip side, with the amount of rigs rolling off contracts around 2016, there were whole crews paid off and some really good lads found themselves out of work. A lot of them were the the very ambitious types, and many of them have dedicated themselves to other professions now. Be interesting to see if companies can tempt them back.

I did a 6 month stint working offshore of Russia, drilling for GazProm (crooks) flew via Moscow to a town called Naryan Mar. Was a real eye opener. Not so keen on working with Russians again, ever.
 
Interesting observation with the shortage of manpower.

The downturn is a good way to get rid of a lot of dead wood, and there was a hell of a lot of dead wood stealing a wage in the North Sea.

On the flip side, with the amount of rigs rolling off contracts around 2016, there were whole crews paid off and some really good lads found themselves out of work. A lot of them were the the very ambitious types, and many of them have dedicated themselves to other professions now. Be interesting to see if companies can tempt them back.

I did a 6 month stint working offshore of Russia, drilling for GazProm (crooks) flew via Moscow to a town called Naryan Mar. Was a real eye opener. Not so keen on working with Russians again, ever.
I bet the ride out in a knackered old Mil was fun, too...?
 
I bet the ride out in a knackered old Mil was fun, too...?
Yes indeed, I think they were Mi8s? Seamed like really sturdy choppers to me.

Flown by two young trainees. The instructor sort of sat behind and between them wearing his brown leather bomber jacket looking the part.

No survival suits, and just sitting on the side benches chilling out and enjoying the ride.

And obviously hoping it didn't crash.

A few times when they approached the rig they did about 5 practice landings. Landing then taking back off, doing a loop around the 500 and landing again. Sometimes happens in the North Sea, but they do it without any passengers aboard as they drop them off on the first run.

'Russia' and 'safety' are two words that don't sound right in the same sentence.

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