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Offshore Windfarm development boosted by £2 million research

Polyester

War Hero
It'll be standard practice in 5 years. The industry is moving so quickly it's like watching Tomorrow's World. Have you seen the new CTV to TP access system? Heave compensation personal winch!

I've heard of it. Not seen one. And you're right about the industry moving quickly. Autonomous fault finding tools, drones inside the turbines, climb assist etc etc. it's mental actually. Did that compensation winch come in because if the bloke who fell on his fall arrest lanyard when the CTV suddenly dropped away from under his feet?

Didn't siemens have an access boom that was tied to the DP of a vessel for transferring to a turbine? It meant techs could transfer in really rough sea states.
 
I've heard of it. Not seen one. And you're right about the industry moving quickly. Autonomous fault finding tools, drones inside the turbines, climb assist etc etc. it's mental actually. Did that compensation winch come in because if the bloke who fell on his fall arrest lanyard when the CTV suddenly dropped away from under his feet?

Didn't siemens have an access boom that was tied to the DP of a vessel for transferring to a turbine? It meant techs could transfer in really rough sea states.

CTV transfer is challenging at the best of times especially if you aren't nimble. Seen lots of incidents that could have turned out a lot worse than they did. Even compensated walkway transfers from SOVs aren't without their problems.
 

NSP

LE
Can you clarify what a DP is? (I was under the impression DP at sea is for dynamic positioning of the vessel). Why would a ”DP” approach a blade arc?

I’m intrigued also by a 25-30 minute emergency shutdown process. That is a long time unless the operator is talking about a team getting into the nacelle to isolate the hub? Or to get into the basement and manually apply the brake? Otherwise it’s a simple stall and apply rotor brake. 45- 60 seconds maybe? That’s why it’s called an emergency stop. Not that it matters. If that’s what you have been told then that’s that. It’s just a bit unusual in my experience.
A DP run-off is when the computer in charge of the thrusters has a brain-fart and decides the position it's supposed be keeping the ship in is actually over there, not here, and furiously tries to move itself as fast as possible to over there. Which is why in the confines of a wind farm sensible drivers don't solely rely on GPS as a reference system.

That e-stop time isn't the time to run a procedure - that's the time it takes the hub to become static AFTER the big red mushroom button has been pushed. Seems you can't just feather the blades and clamp on the brakes and crash stop a 175m diameter rotor when it's spinning at full chat.

Also, same briefing pointed out that in an unfortunate blade/superstructure interface it wouldn't be the blade that broke.

Somewhat sobering...
 
I read (Somewhere) that Windfarm turbines still need copious amounts of oil to operate which, while not defeating the purpose, must have some impact on Carbon Footprint. :cool:
 

NSP

LE
Could you explain what you mean by “regulatable”
You can regulate it; ensure supply is constant.

With wind you are beholden to the vagaries of the weather. Spent the summer going out on deck to enjoy the glorious sunshine, cloudless sky and still air, surrounded by eighty-odd wind turbines of which not one was doing anything other than take up sea-room and cost the operator money.
 

NSP

LE
Offshore WTGs are yawed and stopped to ensure the DP vessel can approach from the optimal TP gate. This is visually confirmed by the bridge prior to final approach.
Not when the dynamically-positioned vessel is there to do seabed clearance for jack-up entry, it seems.

If I can work out how to post it I've a lovely video clip I took whilst 60m away from a turbine going at full chat.
 

Polyester

War Hero
You can regulate it; ensure supply is constant.

With wind you are beholden to the vagaries of the weather. Spent the summer going out on deck to enjoy the glorious sunshine, cloudless sky and still air, surrounded by eighty-odd wind turbines of which not one was doing anything other than take up sea-room and cost the operator money.
May I ask where that was? Was this the UK?
 
If you think that Chinese made wind turbines are a threat, what about the fact that the U.K. has been a net importer of electricity (from other EU states) since 2010 (6.5% of your electricity in 10 years)?

 

Polyester

War Hero
You can regulate it; ensure supply is constant.

With wind you are beholden to the vagaries of the weather. Spent the summer going out on deck to enjoy the glorious sunshine, cloudless sky and still air, surrounded by eighty-odd wind turbines of which not one was doing anything other than take up sea-room and cost the operator money.
OK. This is why I asked. I‘m involved in wind myself. I was an authorised tech for five years and I now teach at our training school. I’m involved in LV, HV, distribution and networks and a variety of other subjects to do with generation and wind in particular for a major DNO. Now I’m not trying to pick a fight but there is a considerable difference in generation at a site in Dutch waters compared to say Beatrice in the Northern quadrant of the North Sea or Dunmaglass in Inverness-shire. Almost constant generation. I have the figures to back this up. I understand the principle you are driving at but this is why generation is constructed in the way that it is in the UK. Multiple sites and multiple generation sites with Hydro as the battery bank and then nuclear as the failsafe.

Thats before we even get into storage.
 

Polyester

War Hero
I read (Somewhere) that Windfarm turbines still need copious amounts of oil to operate which, while not defeating the purpose, must have some impact on Carbon Footprint. :cool:
Not the case. Most are direct drive now. Older models and some small scale sites have gearboxes etc but the efficiency is fairly high.
 

Polyester

War Hero
If you think that Chinese made wind turbines are a threat, what about the fact that the U.K. has been a net importer of electricity (from other EU states) since 2010 (6.5% of your electricity in 10 years)?

that’s a two way street. The year prior we were net exporters. And probably will be again.
 
If you think that Chinese made wind turbines are a threat, what about the fact that the U.K. has been a net importer of electricity (from other EU states) since 2010 (6.5% of your electricity in 10 years)?

According to statistics we, UK, import the same levels of leccy as we did in the 70s. Having said that, all EU nations now import more than they export. :cool:
 

Polyester

War Hero
According to statistics we, UK, import the same levels of leccy as we did in the 70s. Having said that, all EU nations now import more than they export. :cool:
Good point. Plus the reason for import versus export is as complex as the stock market. It’s not always a case of we don’t produce enough or they produce too much.
 

NSP

LE
OK. This is why I asked. I‘m involved in wind myself. I was an authorised tech for five years and I now teach at our training school. I’m involved in LV, HV, distribution and networks and a variety of other subjects to do with generation and wind in particular for a major DNO. Now I’m not trying to pick a fight but there is a considerable difference in generation at a site in Dutch waters compared to say Beatrice in the Northern quadrant of the North Sea or Dunmaglass in Inverness-shire. Almost constant generation. I have the figures to back this up. I understand the principle you are driving at but this is why generation is constructed in the way that it is in the UK. Multiple sites and multiple generation sites with Hydro as the battery bank and then nuclear as the failsafe.

Thats before we even get into storage.
To be honest, my involvement with wind is finding all the leftovers from the Luftwaffe and the cable installation and burial rather than the actual turbine piles, masts and nacelle installation.

I'm s'posed to be on Kriegers Flak at the moment, doing cable trenching and backfill. Rotor diameter 167m.

I was on HKZ last year; rotor diameter 193m.

This is Prinses Amalia, rotor diameter 160m, give or take (and it's turning):-

Prinses Amalia WMPA51.jpg


The things are effing huuuuuuge!!!
 

NSP

LE
OK. This is why I asked. I‘m involved in wind myself. I was an authorised tech for five years and I now teach at our training school. I’m involved in LV, HV, distribution and networks and a variety of other subjects to do with generation and wind in particular for a major DNO. Now I’m not trying to pick a fight but there is a considerable difference in generation at a site in Dutch waters compared to say Beatrice in the Northern quadrant of the North Sea or Dunmaglass in Inverness-shire. Almost constant generation. I have the figures to back this up. I understand the principle you are driving at but this is why generation is constructed in the way that it is in the UK. Multiple sites and multiple generation sites with Hydro as the battery bank and then nuclear as the failsafe.

Thats before we even get into storage.
Do we have enough wind capacity to meet demand, though, given that maybe half the things may be becalmed at any given moment...? That's the crux because we don't appear to have enough nuclear capacity to fill the hole at the moment, hence headlines about needing at least twelve more reactors to meet demand.

Always interesting:-

 

NSP

LE
According to statistics we, UK, import the same levels of leccy as we did in the 70s. Having said that, all EU nations now import more than they export. :cool:
In the noughties I was onboard the survey vessel doing the pre-lay route survey for several planned power cables to allow us to take electricity from France and Ireland (who would be passing on what they sucked out of France, for a price). My job was cartographic drafting supervisor for the onboard survey charting.
 

Polyester

War Hero
Do we have enough wind capacity to meet demand, though, given that maybe half the things may be becalmed at any given moment...? That's the crux because we don't appear to have enough nuclear capacity to fill the hole at the moment, hence headlines about needing at least twelve more reactors to meet demand.

Always interesting:-

Strictly speaking, at the moment, No. We definitely don't and the truth is that the interconnect between the UK and France will probably be giving us electricity for a while yet but as I said it's more complex than them producing two much and us producing too little. The projection for offshore wind generation in the next five years in UK waters is immense. genuinely unparalleled anywhere in the world. And it's offshore that's the key. small Onshore developments will make some money for small private enterprises, pension funds etc but offshore is going to be where it is at. I can't promise that the UK will be independent in terms of electricity supply but first of all it never truly has been and secondly it's definitely the direction we are attempting to go. I reckon we will see two or maybe three more reactors built in our lifetime but tens of thousands of wind turbines.
 

Polyester

War Hero
In the noughties I was onboard the survey vessel doing the pre-lay route survey for several planned power cables to allow us to take electricity from France and Ireland (who would be passing on what they sucked out of France, for a price). My job was cartographic drafting supervisor for the onboard survey charting.
I meant to add, your job sounds very cool. Do you find much crazy stuff under the sea? Crashed planes and munitions etc?
 
Not the case. Most are direct drive now. Older models and some small scale sites have gearboxes etc but the efficiency is fairly high.
On the Siemens 4.0 (with gearbox), annual service was around 50 litres of oil and 25 kg of various lubes. Agree about DD. One new OFW in UK waters actually reduced their maintenance team headcount after the first year as DDs were so efficient and reliable. @Gravdigger
 

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