Offshore Patrol Vessels

Yokel

LE
No, no, you don't understand, the aircraft carrier's primary role is providing short-range missile defence for its consorts.

That's why we need to fit lots of missiles, instead of carrying aircraft, so our aircraft carrier can be more effective by not wasting its time carrying and operating aircraft...
OPVs are going to escort carriers?

I do remember a thread in which someone advocated the carriers carrying less aircraft and more missiles, not unlike the Russian one. Some fool on the PPRuNe Future Carrier thread suggested carrying anti ship missiles.

Anyway, are there any plans to fit Phalanx to OPVs?
 
Originally published : 19 March 2014.

New Border Force cutter helps to protect UK coastline




HMC Protector is 1 of 5 cutters operated by Border Force to protect UK waters and coastline. They operate 24 hours a day, all year round, responding to intelligence-led information or patrolling high-risk areas. Their primary function is to intercept drug shipments and other restricted or prohibited goods being trafficked by sea.

 
Originally published: 30 September 2015.

Border Force speaks about role in migrant crisis


Two Border Force vessels that have been heavily involved in the ongoing EU response to the migrant crisis stopped in GIbraltar today. HMC Protector and HMC Seeker are on their way back to the UK following search and rescue missions off the coast of Italy and Libya, where vast numbers of migrants are trying to make their way across the Mediterranean to Europe. GBC reporter Jonathan Scott spoke to Border Force Maritime Director, Sue Young. Tomorrow morning Border Force professionals will take part in a joint training exercise with HM Customs, the Royal GIbraltar Police, the GIbraltar Defence Police, and the Royal Navy.

 

Yokel

LE

Just as I predicted. Having a second LSD(A) available for amphibious tasking is a real gain for the UK and NATO. I do wonder how Medway will get on without a flight, but we have sent OPVs to the Carribean before.

Perhaps this shows the way the Batch 2 OPVs can free up other assets from routine benign or constabulary type roles.
 
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Because the marketing brochure from Novator claims so?

Life's not as simple as that, as you'd know if you had any idea what you're talking about. You've even been told where you can find out the facts.

But you don't understand, and you can't or won't learn, so you end up looking like this...

View attachment 451542

Fitting Phalanx to the Type 45s was nothing whatsoever to do with dhows or journalists - but then I know that for certain, while you're just reciting nonsense someone else told you.

Neither is including it on Type 26 - but again, if you actually knew anything about the subject, you wouldn't be holding forth with such misplaced confidence.

You're wasting your time arguing with him. Having had his arse comprehensively kicked over claiming that a rapid fire gun was an adequate primary air defence system, he is now trying to turn the narrative around by bashing on a slightly different rapid fire gun and singing the praises of missiles. He's just establishing a series of posts that he can point to in order to claim that he never said that rapid fire guns were the way forward and that he always said that missiles were required for primary air defence. He's so transparent it's laughable.
 

Just as I predicted. Having a second LSD(A) available for amphibious tasking is a real gain for the UK and NATO. I do wonder how Medway will get on without a flight, but we have sent OPVs to the Carribean before.

Perhaps this shows the way the Batch 2 OPVs can free up other assets from routine benign or constabulary type roles.
Yokel mate shes going for Mid life refit not for other tasking's. And Argus is going out there as well with LOTS of flight deck space.
 

Yokel

LE
Yokel mate shes going for Mid life refit not for other tasking's. And Argus is going out there as well with LOTS of flight deck space.
Which kind of defeats the object as it means she cannot act in a mini LPH role as she did for BALTOPS last year. Doh!

MTSB will be ready for tasking after her refit. I remember when she was new a shiny, and I spent hours looking for w magazine spring. Top grub though.
 
Thought I saw Argus in Birkenhead yesterday?
Jut a qucik glimpse from the motorway so may have been mistaken.
Being tasked for it and being able to leave the dock wall are two entirely different things......

However Argus and the Bays are part of the Falmouth cluster so I would doubt it. But not impossible.

Sent from my moto g(7) power using Tapatalk
 
Which kind of defeats the object as it means she cannot act in a mini LPH role as she did for BALTOPS last year. Doh!

MTSB will be ready for tasking after her refit. I remember when she was new a shiny, and I spent hours looking for w magazine spring. Top grub though.
But the object is to get the naval service doing nice shiny fluffy things to go on the news. War isn't popular anymore. Hence why the RN/RFA being on the verge of state on state conflict for two weeks in the gulf got written off as a paragraph talking about a joint exercise in Navy news...

Sent from my moto g(7) power using Tapatalk
 

Flight

LE
Book Reviewer
T26 wont go to sea with the by the time it finally enters service ancient Phalanx - its just for the artists impressions.

Meanwhile, we're back to the future with the Frigate with a very effective short range SAM goalkeeping as we cant bring ourselves to put Sea Ceptor on the carrier yet.

The Great White Chief is spot on, the RN needs to have a very grown up conversation with itself about lethality, and the lack of it, on its war canoes.
Gawd what am I doing?.... It's meerkat...

Have to agree with the last bit. Whilst the grown ups make a good fist of being ever so certain simply looking at the rather vast range of different calibres and missiles deployed around the world on Frigates and the like one could only posit that until someone starts trying to poke holes in war canoes in a proper bang bang situation we just don't know.

Certainly tubs with a lot more short range hardware than ours have been damaged by rather old technology ASMs, the Israeli Saar 5 springs to mind.. Indeed it seems that everytime a tub is pinged there is a story about comms gear interfering, the weapons systems being switched off or some other woulda coulda shoulda.

Last time I checked Sea Dart had the only ASM kill and Phalanx had only ever shot up a battleship and a friendly A6. And lots of mortar rounds I guess...

Not that I'm in any way agreeing that OPVs should be loaded up for bear. Or that aircraft carriers should do other than carry ircraft necessarily..Though I do rather suspect that even the grown ups are guessing, and guessing within rather tight budgetary constraints.
 
Published by: Forces Nat, on 16th April 2020.

New Royal Navy Patrol Ship Makes First Appearance In South Georgia

HMS Forth crossed 850 miles of icy ocean to patrol the waters around the island.

The Royal Navy’s new patrol ship has made its first appearance in South Georgia.

HMS Forth crossed 850 miles of icy ocean to patrol the waters around the South Atlantic territory’s archipelago.
The 2,000-tonne ship arrived in the Falklands at the beginning of the year as the islands’ new patrol ship, replacing the smaller HMS Clyde.

The Navy has said Forth is due to go to South Georgia several times a year, to engage in military training, as well as supporting local authorities and scientists from the British Antarctic Survey (BAS).

Assisting with Forth’s journey, an RAF A400M Atlas Maritime Patrol aircraft scoured the stretch of ocean for floating ice . . . . ( . . . Eh ?!).

On her maiden visit of South Georgia, HMS Forth carried Brigadier Nick Sawyer – Commander of British Forces South Atlantic Islands – as well as two dozen soldiers, air force personnel and civil servants.

1587299022043.png


 
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Published by: Charlotte Ikonen, News Editor, The Argus, on 17th April 2020.

Royal Navy ship HMS Mersey spotted in Brighton.

HMS Mersey - one of the Royal Navy's smallest ships - has been spotted in Brighton.

The 79-metre long ship was seen arriving yesterday afternoon as the city stays on coronavirus lockdown.

A Ministry of Defence spokeswoman said the ship was on "fishing protection duty," and making a "routine anchoring off," whereby the ship stays put and is used as an overnight base.

She said: "It's not unusual for her to be on that specific coast. She has been on fishing protection duty, protecting UK waters."

1587299262136.png


 
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Published by: Forces Nat, on 16th April 2020.

New Royal Navy Patrol Ship Makes First Appearance In South Georgia

HMS Forth crossed 850 miles of icy ocean to patrol the waters around the island.

The Royal Navy’s new patrol ship has made its first appearance in South Georgia.

HMS Forth crossed 850 miles of icy ocean to patrol the waters around the South Atlantic territory’s archipelago.
The 2,000-tonne ship arrived in the Falklands at the beginning of the year as the islands’ new patrol ship, replacing the smaller HMS Clyde.

The Navy has said Forth is due to go to South Georgia several times a year, to engage in military training, as well as supporting local authorities and scientists from the British Antarctic Survey (BAS).
Assisting with Forth’s journey, an RAF A400M Atlas Maritime Patrol aircraft scoured the stretch of ocean for floating ice.

On her maiden visit of South Georgia, HMS Forth carried Brigadier Nick Sawyer – Commander of British Forces South Atlantic Islands – as well as two dozen soldiers, air force personnel and civil servants.

View attachment 467011

Royal Air Force please.
 
Published by: Forces Nat, on 16th April 2020.

New Royal Navy Patrol Ship Makes First Appearance In South Georgia . . . .

Assisting with Forth’s journey, an RAF A400M Atlas Maritime Patrol aircraft scoured the stretch of ocean for floating ice . . . . ( . . . Eh ?!) . . .

.
[DRIFT]

Assisting with Forth’s journey, an RAF A400M Atlas Maritime Patrol aircraft scoured the stretch of ocean for floating ice . . . . ( . . . Eh ?!).

Well . . . . they seem to have found something useful for at least one of them to do . . .

+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +

Originally published by: Think Defence, on 09 February 2014.
.

Future Maritime Patrol – Part 6 (C130J and A400M Options)

Eyes down look in for the final instalment in the Future Maritime Patrol series, apart from a quick summary.
We have looked at all the conventional options; large aircraft like the Boeing P-8A Poseidon, smaller aircraft like the Airbus C295, business jet and even unmanned aircraft. One option remains, using a large aircraft already, or soon to be, in service.

How about a Sea Hercules or Sea Atlas?

Neither are in service anywhere, despite many PowerPoint shows and models (mainly for the former) although a long range Search and Rescue variant of the Hercules is in service with the US Coast Guard. A long range SAR aircraft would of course be useful, but as we have discussed, long range SAR languishes at the very bottom of the reasons for reinstating a maritime patrol capability, so, any similar conversion would have to provide the high end anti submarine capability as found in the P-8A for example.

Is any of this possible, is it a good idea, or simply a triumph of PowerPoint over reality?

The final question to ask is, just because we can, should we? . . .

Maritime Patrol, Overland ISTAR and EW

To turn the A400M into an AAR aircraft is there for the taking, it no requires no aircraft redesign and will be in service with other nations, pretty much, a no risk capability.

If we want to look at the multi-mission flexibility evidenced by Lockheed Martin with the C130 then more effort will be required.

There are three broad challenges;
  • Punching holes in the fuselage
  • Dropping weapons
  • Fitting mission systems and crew facilities
As we know, as soon as you start drilling holes in the fuselage of any aircraft, costs rise. Our goal should be to minimise this airframe work.

The A400M does not have a bomb bay and is not blessed with many hard-points for external carriage. Dropping weapons (and sonobuoys) therefore, becomes a physical challenge.

Operating in the back of a large transport aircraft is not conducive to the levels of concentration and efficiency required for these complex tasks, some means of housing additional crew in an environment that befits their role will be required.

In addition to those challenges, we would have to address the high cost of the base airframe and running costs.

In order to minimise airframe modification (and resultant cost) the maximum use of podded systems would seem the best approach.

1587306500595.png


[/DRIFT]
 
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Dr Death

Old-Salt
Published by: Charlotte Ikonen, News Editor, The Argus, on 17th April 2020.

Royal Navy ship HMS Mersey spotted in Brighton.

HMS Mersey - one of the Royal Navy's smallest ships - has been spotted in Brighton.

The 79-metre long ship was seen arriving yesterday afternoon as the city stays on coronavirus lockdown.

A Ministry of Defence spokeswoman said the ship was on "fishing protection duty," and making a "routine anchoring off," whereby the ship stays put and is used as an overnight base.

She said: "It's not unusual for her to be on that specific coast. She has been on fishing protection duty, protecting UK waters."

View attachment 467017

Reporting on more than 2 people on the beach, nudist area populated by aged saggy ladies.
Plod are called in after the Navy reports it, failure to move and a RM RIB goes in to lay the law down!
 
.
[DRIFT]

Assisting with Forth’s journey, an RAF A400M Atlas Maritime Patrol aircraft scoured the stretch of ocean for floating ice . . . . ( . . . Eh ?!).

Well . . . . they seem to have found something useful for at least one of them to do . . .

+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +

Originally published by: Think Defence, on 09 February 2014.
.

Future Maritime Patrol – Part 6 (C130J and A400M Options)

Eyes down look in for the final instalment in the Future Maritime Patrol series, apart from a quick summary.
We have looked at all the conventional options; large aircraft like the Boeing P-8A Poseidon, smaller aircraft like the Airbus C295, business jet and even unmanned aircraft. One option remains, using a large aircraft already, or soon to be, in service.

How about a Sea Hercules or Sea Atlas?

Neither are in service anywhere, despite many PowerPoint shows and models (mainly for the former) although a long range Search and Rescue variant of the Hercules is in service with the US Coast Guard. A long range SAR aircraft would of course be useful, but as we have discussed, long range SAR languishes at the very bottom of the reasons for reinstating a maritime patrol capability, so, any similar conversion would have to provide the high end anti submarine capability as found in the P-8A for example.

Is any of this possible, is it a good idea, or simply a triumph of PowerPoint over reality?

The final question to ask is, just because we can, should we? . . .

Maritime Patrol, Overland ISTAR and EW

To turn the A400M into an AAR aircraft is there for the taking, it no requires no aircraft redesign and will be in service with other nations, pretty much, a no risk capability.

If we want to look at the multi-mission flexibility evidenced by Lockheed Martin with the C130 then more effort will be required.

There are three broad challenges;
  • Punching holes in the fuselage
  • Dropping weapons
  • Fitting mission systems and crew facilities
As we know, as soon as you start drilling holes in the fuselage of any aircraft, costs rise. Our goal should be to minimise this airframe work.

The A400M does not have a bomb bay and is not blessed with many hard-points for external carriage. Dropping weapons (and sonobuoys) therefore, becomes a physical challenge.

Operating in the back of a large transport aircraft is not conducive to the levels of concentration and efficiency required for these complex tasks, some means of housing additional crew in an environment that befits their role will be required.

In addition to those challenges, we would have to address the high cost of the base airframe and running costs.

In order to minimise airframe modification (and resultant cost) the maximum use of podded systems would seem the best approach.

View attachment 467050

[/DRIFT]
Look into the USMC's KC-130J Harvest HAWK aircraft.
 

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