Offshore Patrol Vessels

The article does not say one way or the other, as you say, which is why I asked the question. However if the ship can communicate with the aircraft herself then that is useful as she can extend radar coverage beyond that of shore sites.

Her predecessor was also said to have an air search radar - maybe that is why.
Which bit of "electrickery" would that be then . . . ?!

1578955062237.png
 
Terma 4100. Sitting right at the top of the main mast.
Not a bad radar allegedly.
 
Big and Expensive CMS-1 blurb


“We are the sole supplier and integrator of combat management systems (CMS) for the UK Royal Navy’s surface and sub-surface fleet.
We have worked closely with the UK Royal Navy to combine our experience in development and support and their experience in warfighting to shape the development of these systems. Our strength in command and information systems includes interfaces to a wide range of combat system equipment and leading European and US weapon systems.

Our CMS family supports planning, tactical picture compilation, decision-making and weapon control to meet multiple emergent threats in blue water and littoral operations. CMS-1 is the heart of the combat system, providing situational awareness and weapon control from its intuitive consoles.

Programme(s)

CMS-1 was developed for the UK Royal Navy’s Type 45 Destroyers and we will support it in service with the Royal Navy for at least the next three decades. A programme of through-life technology refresh and capability upgrades will ensure that CMS-1 continues to meet operational requirements in the future.

CMS-1 supports NATO and other coalition operations, and we are constantly evolving programmes to enhance the network enabled capabilities of its sensors and command systems on a number of further naval ships.
 

Yokel

LE
Terma 4100. Sitting right at the top of the main mast.
Not a bad radar allegedly.
I wonder how it compares to something like 997 - and can it be used to control aircraft?

Big and Expensive CMS-1 blurb


“We are the sole supplier and integrator of combat management systems (CMS) for the UK Royal Navy’s surface and sub-surface fleet.
We have worked closely with the UK Royal Navy to combine our experience in development and support and their experience in warfighting to shape the development of these systems. Our strength in command and information systems includes interfaces to a wide range of combat system equipment and leading European and US weapon systems.

Our CMS family supports planning, tactical picture compilation, decision-making and weapon control to meet multiple emergent threats in blue water and littoral operations. CMS-1 is the heart of the combat system, providing situational awareness and weapon control from its intuitive consoles.

Programme(s)

CMS-1 was developed for the UK Royal Navy’s Type 45 Destroyers and we will support it in service with the Royal Navy for at least the next three decades. A programme of through-life technology refresh and capability upgrades will ensure that CMS-1 continues to meet operational requirements in the future.

CMS-1 supports NATO and other coalition operations, and we are constantly evolving programmes to enhance the network enabled capabilities of its sensors and command systems on a number of further naval ships.
What are you saying? Is CMS-1 fitted to the Batch 2 RCOPVs? If it is then so what? Was it used an an 'off the shelf' system?

The Batch 2s are going to be used for the forward presence role in places that do not need a fully tooled up frigate or destroyer such as the Falklands or the Caribbean.
 
I wonder how it compares to something like 997 - and can it be used to control aircraft?



What are you saying? Is CMS-1 fitted to the Batch 2 RCOPVs? If it is then so what? Was it used an an 'off the shelf' system?

The Batch 2s are going to be used for the forward presence role in places that do not need a fully tooled up frigate or destroyer such as the Falklands or the Caribbean.
Your googlefu is very poor...


The Batch 2 ships are fundamentally different in appearance and capabilities from the preceding Batch 1. Notable differences include the 90.5 metres (296 ft 11 in) long hull,[2] a top speed of 24 knots (44 km/h; 28 mph),[2] Merlin-capable flight deck,[2] a displacement of around 2,000 tonnes[4][5] and greatly expanded capacity for accommodating troops.[2] The Batch 2 ships also have a different (full width) superstructure, and a fundamentally different above-water hullform shape (greater bow flare, different & less-pronounced forward knuckle line compared to the Batch 1 ships, lack of the distinctive fwd & aft bulwarks of the Batch 1 vessels). The class is also fitted with the Kelvin Hughes SharpEye integrated radar system for navigation,[8] the Terma Scanter 4100 2D radar for air and surface surveillance,[9] and a BAE CMS-1 Combat Management System.[5][10] The Batch 2 ships therefore arguably represent a distinctly separate class to the preceding Batch 1.

Batch 2 are also the first Royal Navy ships fitted with the BAE Systems Shared Infrastructure operating system.[5] BAE describes Shared Infrastructure as "a state-of-the-art system that will revolutionise the way ships operate by using virtual technologies to host and integrate the sensors, weapons and management systems that complex warships require. Replacing multiple large consoles dedicated to specific tasks with a single hardware solution reduces a number of spares required to be carried onboard and will significantly decrease through-life costs."[28]
 

Yokel

LE
Yes you are quite correct - I looked for Richard Beedall's Navy Matters website which had information from when Clyde was in build or new in service and still referred to as FOPV(H). Maybe the website no longer exists?

It is good to learn that the Batch 2 are similarly equipped with respect to radar.
 
Your googlefu is very poor...


The Batch 2 ships are fundamentally different in appearance and capabilities from the preceding Batch 1. Notable differences include the 90.5 metres (296 ft 11 in) long hull,[2] a top speed of 24 knots (44 km/h; 28 mph),[2] Merlin-capable flight deck,[2] a displacement of around 2,000 tonnes[4][5] and greatly expanded capacity for accommodating troops.[2] The Batch 2 ships also have a different (full width) superstructure, and a fundamentally different above-water hullform shape (greater bow flare, different & less-pronounced forward knuckle line compared to the Batch 1 ships, lack of the distinctive fwd & aft bulwarks of the Batch 1 vessels). The class is also fitted with the Kelvin Hughes SharpEye integrated radar system for navigation,[8] the Terma Scanter 4100 2D radar for air and surface surveillance,[9] and a BAE CMS-1 Combat Management System.[5][10] The Batch 2 ships therefore arguably represent a distinctly separate class to the preceding Batch 1.

Batch 2 are also the first Royal Navy ships fitted with the BAE Systems Shared Infrastructure operating system.[5] BAE describes Shared Infrastructure as "a state-of-the-art system that will revolutionise the way ships operate by using virtual technologies to host and integrate the sensors, weapons and management systems that complex warships require. Replacing multiple large consoles dedicated to specific tasks with a single hardware solution reduces a number of spares required to be carried onboard and will significantly decrease through-life costs."[28]
Canada's new OPVs will have a simplified version of the same CMS (CMS-330) used in the refit of the existing frigates, as well as will be fitted to the new frigates. If I recall correctly the reason given was to cut training costs and allow for more flexible assignment of crew across the RCN as a whole.

Given this, I'm not surprised that the RN are doing the same.
 
Yes you are quite correct - I looked for Richard Beedall's Navy Matters website which had information from when Clyde was in build or new in service and still referred to as FOPV(H). Maybe the website no longer exists?

It is good to learn that the Batch 2 are similarly equipped with respect to radar.
his sites long dead. A good decade.
 

Yokel

LE
The second of the Batch 2 River class OPVs (which really have little similarity with the originals), HMS Medway, has sailed this morning for the Caribbean to relieve RFA Mounts Bay and to provide 'forward presence' for a number of years.


I wonder how the manning of forward deployed vessels will work. Will they crew swop (with whom if all the B2s are overseas?) or do the three watch thing the UK based OPVs do?
 
The second of the Batch 2 River class OPVs (which really have little similarity with the originals), HMS Medway, has sailed this morning for the Caribbean to relieve RFA Mounts Bay and to provide 'forward presence' for a number of years.


I wonder how the manning of forward deployed vessels will work. Will they crew swop (with whom if all the B2s are overseas?) or do the three watch thing the UK based OPVs do?
I wish them fair weather and fine seas.
 

Yokel

LE
It looks like someone has been reading this thread!

HMS Medway sets sail for the Caribbean

While the OPVs will remain on task, members of the ship’s company will spend 10 weeks on the ship and then four weeks off in rotation. Because the ship’s company is greater than the crew required to take her to sea, personnel can take leave, complete promotion courses and undertake training while ensuring the ship remains on station.


It also appears she has containers (for disaster relief?) onboard:


Does anyone know where the other three Batch 2s are going?
 

Yokel

LE
And lo! There was a White Ensign in the east!
Where exactly? I know there was talk of Singapore and having one for engagement in South East Asia and FPDA type things but where else? The Arabian Gulf is too high a threat level, but could one be used for Counter Piracy/Narcotics in the Indian Ocean? Their was talk of one at Gibraltar but I cannot see it.

On the forward basing note, what of the plans to base the Batch 1s in ports near the rivers they are named after?
 

Mr._Average

Old-Salt
Nice clip from Medway. Looks like they've manoeuvred that container into a slightly more convenient spot so they can use the flight deck.

 
Nice clip from Medway. Looks like they've manoeuvred that container into a slightly more convenient spot so they can use the flight deck.

Were the heli crew offered a tot of rum, or just took the bottle... Merlin can land on that flight deck?
 
Where exactly? I know there was talk of Singapore and having one for engagement in South East Asia and FPDA type things but where else? The Arabian Gulf is too high a threat level, but could one be used for Counter Piracy/Narcotics in the Indian Ocean? Their was talk of one at Gibraltar but I cannot see it.

On the forward basing note, what of the plans to base the Batch 1s in ports near the rivers they are named after?
1. Mediterranean (Gibraltar/Cyprus)

2. Caribbean

3. Falklands (South Atlantic)

4. (Transiting/repositioning)

5. REFIT



Originally published by: Keith Campbell, THINK DEFENCE, on 17 June 2016 . . .
 
Where exactly? I know there was talk of Singapore and having one for engagement in South East Asia and FPDA type things but where else? The Arabian Gulf is too high a threat level, but could one be used for Counter Piracy/Narcotics in the Indian Ocean? Their was talk of one at Gibraltar but I cannot see it.

On the forward basing note, what of the plans to base the Batch 1s in ports near the rivers they are named after?
well yes indeed, places East can be a bit more ‘exciting’, see the conversation about uparming them.

so it’s an easy option

one based in the FI
one based in WI
one based in Gib
one based in Juffair covering NAG/Horn of Africa
one based in Singapore

the last 3 Basings put a permanent RN presence on the 3 strategic choke points along which the vast percentage of UK Bound trade flows.
 

Yokel

LE
Surely basing one in Bahrain will just be inviting disaster - a small frigate sized warship that the politicians will try to use as a proper frigate or destroyer, and might be seen as an easy target by the IRGCN etc?

Not sure what an OPV can do to protect shipping in a choke point. They are just to small to be adequately armed for submarine, missile, and air threats.

Could Phalanx be fitted? Not that it offers much help to vessels being escorted...
 
Surely basing one in Bahrain will just be inviting disaster - a small frigate sized warship that the politicians will try to use as a proper frigate or destroyer, and might be seen as an easy target by the IRGCN etc?

Not sure what an OPV can do to protect shipping in a choke point. They are just to small to be adequately armed for submarine, missile, and air threats.

Could Phalanx be fitted? Not that it offers much help to vessels being escorted...

Bahrains the base port… they be ideal for swanning around flag wagging and provide presence outside the Gulf and keeping an eye on things as long at they stay away from properly unfriendly shores.

Think more here

One covers Med
One covers east of Suez to Hindia
t'other covers Hindia to South China Sea
Screenshot 2020-01-21 at 14.44.52.png
 
One you consider this map the worlds strategic maritime chokepoints, the logic is obvious

1-s2.0-S2210539517300172-gr5.jpg
 

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