Offshore Patrol Vessels

One thing you forget about the IRGC is that they may not be worried about that OPV, but if they mallet it, its bigger badder brother the T23 GP/T31/T26 comes along with the US 5th Fleet and ruins your day. So the force and ensign confers protection that way.
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I’m sure that will be a reassurance to the survivors bobbing about in the warm waters of the Gulf.

Better still, look the part and deter any silly ideas.
 
Published by: BAE SYSTMES' news room, on 12 Aug 2014.

New contract award for Royal Navy Offshore Patrol Vessels

We have been awarded a £348 million contract by the UK Ministry of Defence to construct three new Offshore Patrol Vessels (OPVs) for the UK Royal Navy.

The new 90 metre vessels will be built at our facilities in Glasgow and will provide additional capability for the Royal Navy. Based on a proven design, the ships will be used to support counter-terrorism, counter-piracy and anti-smuggling operations in the waters around the UK and will protect other UK interests abroad.

Mick Ord, Managing Director at BAE Systems Naval Ships, said: “This is a significant contract award which marks the beginning of a new and exciting chapter for the UK shipbuilding sector. We’re making major investments in our people, technology and facilities to create a world-class complex warship capability and the OPVs provide an opportunity to embed these new ways of working. This will ensure we remain competitive and are best placed to secure the Type 26 manufacturing contract, which together with the investments will sustain the long-term future of this highly skilled industry.”

Our engineers have adapted the proven OPV design already in-service with the Brazilian Navy and Royal Thai Navy, to ensure it meets the requirements of the Royal Navy. Today’s announcement builds on the contract for long lead items, such as gear boxes and engines, announced in March. Production will start in October, with the first of class expected to be delivered to the Royal Navy in 2017.

The ships will be larger and more efficient than the existing River Class OPVs, providing a step change in capability to the Royal Navy with more room for embarked personnel, the addition of a flight deck capable of landing Merlin helicopters and storage space. With a maximum speed of 24 knots and a range of 5,500 nautical miles, the ships will be globally deployable and capable of ocean patrol.

We delivered three OPVs to the Brazilian Navy in 2012-2013. Providing maritime security to Brazil, the ships recently performed a key role safeguarding the 2014 World Cup by patrolling the coastline close to Rio de Janeiro.

HTMS KRABI, in service with the Royal Thai Navy, is based on the same OPV design and was constructed under license in Thailand by Bangkok Dock.


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New contract award for Royal Navy Offshore Patrol Vessels | BAE Systems | United Kingdom

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HTMS Krabi is in service with the Royal Thai Navy. A second boat of this type was ordered in 2017. Photo: BAE Systems.

Five new ‘Batch 2’ boats . . . . The first – HMS Forth will be delivered in 2018. HMS Spey, the fifth and final ship of the class will be in service by 2021. Unlike other military vessels built in the UK, the River Class recorded two export sales – the sale of three Amazon Class boats to Brazil and one, built in Thailand, to the Thai Navy that has recently ordered a second boat of this type.

The 90 meter long, 2,000 tonnes OPV includes a modified flight deck capable of operating the latest Merlin helicopters, larger stores and more accommodation for embarked troops. As OPVs, these ocean-going boats have the size, capacity for mission endurance of 35 days, and operate at distance of 5,500 nautical miles from shore. It can develop a maximum speed of 24 knots. The ship’s flight deck supports medium helicopters up to a Merlin size, two RHIB boats and a 16-ton crane are also included. The vessel is armed with a gun turret mounting a 30mm cannon as its main armament.

HMS Forth is the first ship in the Royal Navy to employ the Shared Infrastructure architecture that integrates the sensors, weapons and management systems that operate on board. By replacing individual consoles and electronic racks designed specifically for each system, with common hardware, Shared Infrastructure will save space, reduces logistics complexity and cost and decrease through life costs streamline logistics and improve. The boat has a crew 34 and accommodation for up to 60.

River Class OPV - Defense Update:

Published by: Tamir Eshel, Defence Update, on 17 August 2017.
 
I’m sure that will be a reassurance to the survivors bobbing about in the warm waters of the Gulf.

Better still, look the part and deter any silly ideas.
You are missing my point. The other forces are the deterrent, the threat would have increased so that a full on Escort would be required and the OPV would be protected/withdrawn along with the MCMV's and other HVT's. If they are going to bounce the OPV to sink it with out warning then they are starting a war deliberately, and they could therefore bring up the kit required to sink your Corvette/light frigate anyway.

The OPV isn't there for full on conflict and that is the point the RN is trying to make by keeping heavy weapons off the OPV so it wont be misused. Oh and saving money so we can concentrate on equipping the actual escorts as best as we can afford.

The RN wants to be acting the part not just looking.
 
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...while ignoring the greater range of the Sukhois...
With respect, I also ignored your repeated incorrect claims that the Su-27 has greater payload when in actuality the Typhoon’s is double that of the FLANKER (which also has a slightly smaller range of weapons); even the updated Su-34 and Su-35 FLANKER variants have a lower payload!

Published by: BAE SYSTMES' news room, on 12 Aug 2014.

New contract award for Royal Navy Offshore Patrol Vessels

We have been awarded a £348 million contract by the UK Ministry of Defence to construct three new Offshore Patrol Vessels (OPVs) for the UK Royal Navy.

The new 90 metre vessels will be built at our facilities in Glasgow and will provide additional capability for the Royal Navy. Based on a proven design, the ships will be used to support counter-terrorism, counter-piracy and anti-smuggling operations in the waters around the UK and will protect other UK interests abroad.

Mick Ord, Managing Director at BAE Systems Naval Ships, said: “This is a significant contract award which marks the beginning of a new and exciting chapter for the UK shipbuilding sector. We’re making major investments in our people, technology and facilities to create a world-class complex warship capability and the OPVs provide an opportunity to embed these new ways of working. This will ensure we remain competitive and are best placed to secure the Type 26 manufacturing contract, which together with the investments will sustain the long-term future of this highly skilled industry.”

Our engineers have adapted the proven OPV design already in-service with the Brazilian Navy and Royal Thai Navy, to ensure it meets the requirements of the Royal Navy. Today’s announcement builds on the contract for long lead items, such as gear boxes and engines, announced in March. Production will start in October, with the first of class expected to be delivered to the Royal Navy in 2017.

The ships will be larger and more efficient than the existing River Class OPVs, providing a step change in capability to the Royal Navy with more room for embarked personnel, the addition of a flight deck capable of landing Merlin helicopters and storage space. With a maximum speed of 24 knots and a range of 5,500 nautical miles, the ships will be globally deployable and capable of ocean patrol.

We delivered three OPVs to the Brazilian Navy in 2012-2013. Providing maritime security to Brazil, the ships recently performed a key role safeguarding the 2014 World Cup by patrolling the coastline close to Rio de Janeiro.

HTMS KRABI, in service with the Royal Thai Navy, is based on the same OPV design and was constructed under license in Thailand by Bangkok Dock.


View attachment 403362

New contract award for Royal Navy Offshore Patrol Vessels | BAE Systems | United Kingdom

+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +

View attachment 403364
HTMS Krabi is in service with the Royal Thai Navy. A second boat of this type was ordered in 2017. Photo: BAE Systems.

Five new ‘Batch 2’ boats . . . . The first – HMS Forth will be delivered in 2018. HMS Spey, the fifth and final ship of the class will be in service by 2021. Unlike other military vessels built in the UK, the River Class recorded two export sales – the sale of three Amazon Class boats to Brazil and one, built in Thailand, to the Thai Navy that has recently ordered a second boat of this type.

The 90 meter long, 2,000 tonnes OPV includes a modified flight deck capable of operating the latest Merlin helicopters, larger stores and more accommodation for embarked troops. As OPVs, these ocean-going boats have the size, capacity for mission endurance of 35 days, and operate at distance of 5,500 nautical miles from shore. It can develop a maximum speed of 24 knots. The ship’s flight deck supports medium helicopters up to a Merlin size, two RHIB boats and a 16-ton crane are also included. The vessel is armed with a gun turret mounting a 30mm cannon as its main armament.

HMS Forth is the first ship in the Royal Navy to employ the Shared Infrastructure architecture that integrates the sensors, weapons and management systems that operate on board. By replacing individual consoles and electronic racks designed specifically for each system, with common hardware, Shared Infrastructure will save space, reduces logistics complexity and cost and decrease through life costs streamline logistics and improve. The boat has a crew 34 and accommodation for up to 60.

River Class OPV - Defense Update:

Published by: Tamir Eshel, Defence Update, on 17 August 2017.
To my non-maritime eye, that looks a useful vessel approaching what some may even describe as a (whisper it) corvette (what is the objection to that nomenclature by the way?)!

One of the most positive aspects I would suggest is that it will be able to carry a Merlin or Wildcat. For those of a nervous disposition, these can of course carry a useful offensive punch themselves to augment the 30mm.

While acknowledging other funding priorities, it would be nice if this Class acted as a catalyst for the RN to procure a small VTOL UAV to augment the vessel’s ISR capabilities. To me, that’s the real benefit of these OPVs, providing presence and ISR with the potential to apply limited kinetic effect with the 30mm or an embarked aviation asset.

If things look a little more serious, you call in an FFG or something bigger (just as the RN have done this week in the Gulf to excellent effect) or air assets.

Regards,
MM
 
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George Zambellas loathed the "c word"...
 
Because it was the back end of herrick and the vinegar strokes of QE being built.

He didn't want CGS to claim Corvettes = FF/DD and try and take the EP profile and give it to FRES. Hence the line "corvettes are the snatch land rovers in the maritime" that was trotted out...
 
To my non-maritime eye, that looks a useful vessel approaching what some may even describe as a (whisper it) corvette (what is the objection to that nomenclature by the way?)!

One of the most positive aspects I would suggest is that it will be able to carry a Merlin or Wildcat. For those of a nervous disposition, these can of course carry a useful offensive punch themselves to augment the 30mm.

While acknowledging other funding priorities, it would be nice if this Class acted as a catalyst for the RN to procure a small VTOL UAV to augment the vessel’s ISR capabilities. To me, that’s the real benefit of these OPVs, providing presence and ISR with the potential to apply limited kinetic effect with the 30mm or an embarked aviation asset.

If things look a little more serious, you call in an FFG or something bigger (just as the RN have done this week in the Gulf to excellent effect) or air assets.

Regards,
MM
The trouble is that in the mind of those who Sir Roger Scruton would describe as 'not being in the habit of thinking' Corvette = Frigate = Destroyer = Escort.

I would be nice to have more Wildcats HM2s and Merlin HM2s, but the priority would still be the carrier(s), frigates and destroyers, and RFAs. If we had a suitable UAV it could be embarked, but the 30mm is for self defence.

When these extra vessels were announced, I wondered if they were a bit of a White Elephant, particularly regarding manpower. I started this thread in good faith, for reason connected to my own career and the possibility of being involved in manning (particularly with the batch 1s being kept in service). I am not going to openly go into details, but some of the decision making seems barmy - given they they do need personnel from one of the RN's pinch points.
 
You are missing my point. The other forces are the deterrent, the threat would have increased so that a full on Escort would be required and the OPV would be protected/withdrawn along with the MCMV's and other HVT's. If they are going to bounce the OPV to sink it with out warning then they are starting a war deliberately, and they could therefore bring up the kit required to sink your Corvette/light frigate anyway.

The OPV isn't there for full on conflict and that is the point the RN is trying to make by keeping heavy weapons off the OPV so it wont be misused. Oh and saving money so we can concentrate on equipping the actual escorts as best as we can afford.

The RN wants to be acting the part not just looking.
Upgunned OPVs raise the tripwire the other side have to be willing to cross.

The Iranian Navy is keeping its arms carefully folded in all this, it’s the IRGC in their Boston Whalers as usual being the regional pest.
 
Upgunned OPVs raise the tripwire the other side have to be willing to cross.

The Iranian Navy is keeping its arms carefully folded in all this, it’s the IRGC in their Boston Whalers as usual being the regional pest.
No it doesn't, the trip wire is still the same, its a Coalition "warship". Doesn't matter what it is fitted with. To attack it is to bring down the wrath of the combined arms of that coalition. That's the tripwire.

The IRGN have plenty of assets above and beyond basic FIAC's with which to attack your "light Frigate" and swamp it with missiles and so on. Add a 76mm gun they just bring up some ASHM's to the party.

And if the threat is that bad it would be withdrawn or screened by a better armed asset.
 
No it doesn't, the trip wire is still the same, its a Coalition "warship". Doesn't matter what it is fitted with. To attack it is to bring down the wrath of the combined arms of that coalition. That's the tripwire.

The IRGN have plenty of assets above and beyond basic FIAC's with which to attack your "light Frigate" and swamp it with missiles and so on. Add a 76mm gun they just bring up some ASHM's to the party.

And if the threat is that bad it would be withdrawn or screened by a better armed asset.

You're getting it.
Bigger weapons requires them to escalate.
Lt Jafarrian got carried away and fired some 107 rockets is one thing, Lt Syerdolleh being despatched to target it with a salvo of C802's is quite another. Even the IRGC keeps a tighter leash on its bigger weapons.

Back in the day we ''got it', our previous stab at a Light Frigate for patrolling the Gulf.
Cheap and easy to man, enough teeth to look after itself and require a substantial effort to confront it.

T31 was meant to be a modern version - small, cheap, affordable, credible, but seems to have grown legs and morphed into a near 7,000 tonne proper and very expensive frigate.

And so… with T31 now much bigger than a T23 - the backstop 'solution' to the lack of a cheap 'Patrol Frigate' will be back at the door of the B2 OPV's


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Right now - the thing the RN needs more than anything else is a manpower uplift as expected in 2010. This is actually one of my concerns about OPVs - are they talking people (including those we are short of such Senior rate ME/WE, CIS, Warfare Officers) from the proper fleet of war fighting ships?

The more frigate like the B2 RCOPVs become, the greater the danger that one that is the nearest RN ship will get sent into the firing line.
 
We're not getting any manpower uplift, and in the main, we've got roughly the right number of people. What we have got completely out of whack is where they serve, and their length of time at sea.
 
The more frigate like the B2 RCOPVs become, the greater the danger that one that is the nearest RN ship will get sent into the firing line.
So what do you do if a forward deployed B2 OPV is the nearest or only ensign to be found in the region?
Decline the dance?

That’s the problem there. Once was a time when the OPV de jour, usually an old sweeper would run away bravely and let the nearby Frigate or Destroyer throw its weight around.
But now, the ‘muscle’ may be a days away. Your OPV May have no option but to go forth bravely.

And the point has been raised. A B2 OPV is as big as former Frigates, and now expected to do the same guardship duties, but without a Frigates bite.
‘Big enough to get into trouble, not enough teeth to get out of it’.

The OPV label needs to go away. They are as big as a major warship, and sold as such to other Navy’s. After all, the defanged Leanders weren't touted as OPVs.
 
We're not getting any manpower uplift, and in the main, we've got roughly the right number of people. What we have got completely out of whack is where they serve, and their length of time at sea.

That’s the truth.
Why are so many desks full of clearly fed up RN types doing jobs that formerly were done by much cheaper MoD CS?

Delete D grade admin manager, £24k p/a, replace with engineering WO1, double that and then some. Complain bitterly about a shortage of Engineers and budget.
 
Right now - the thing the RN needs more than anything else is a manpower uplift as expected in 2010. This is actually one of my concerns about OPVs - are they talking people (including those we are short of such Senior rate ME/WE, CIS, Warfare Officers) from the proper fleet of war fighting ships?

The more frigate like the B2 RCOPVs become, the greater the danger that one that is the nearest RN ship will get sent into the firing line.
Plus while all the Batch 2s may not buy 1 Type 26.... the Manpower and maintenance etc is also an additional cost
 
Of course, optics are important as well.

If you send an OPV as opposed to a Frigate/destroyer, the potential enemy can portray it as a sign of weakness
 
So what do you do if a forward deployed B2 OPV is the nearest or only ensign to be found in the region?
Decline the dance?

That’s the problem there. Once was a time when the OPV de jour, usually an old sweeper would run away bravely and let the nearby Frigate or Destroyer throw its weight around.
But now, the ‘muscle’ may be a days away. Your OPV May have no option but to go forth bravely.

And the point has been raised. A B2 OPV is as big as former Frigates, and now expected to do the same guardship duties, but without a Frigates bite.
‘Big enough to get into trouble, not enough teeth to get out of it’.

The OPV label needs to go away. They are as big as a major warship, and sold as such to other Navy’s. After all, the defanged Leanders weren't touted as OPVs.
What has size got to do with it? Size means the ship has longer endurance, better ability to handle rough sea states, larger flightdeck for safer helicopter operations and better accommodation for crews. Every class of ship the RN has grown in tonnage. Destroyers with the displacement of light cruisers! How it is equipped for the role defines how it is used and then how much trouble it could get into. I.E. with defensive armament and basic sensors. Easily able to say well this ship can't do that threat area. In the show case we are using the of the Gulf there is plenty of muscle already there.

But there is a perfectly reasonable case that certain areas like the Caribbean, West Africa and the Falklands could easily be dealt with by a B2 on its own with the planned armament and systems..
 

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