Official WW2 Photographs

If you can ever find them again. Museums never put as much emphasis on a collection as an individual can, thankfully the internet is allowing collections to be published.
Except perhaps when the collection is on loan from say Lord Ashcroft? I know his specialism is VC's but he may know other collectors that can put the care and attention to such things while making them accessible.
 
Post 1, first picture. The full screw is presumably an MP by the webbing and cap. The Krauts have an entertaining mix of clothing, including puttees, which I didn't think they started wearing until much later. The shades of clothing seem to be a mix of the Indiana Jones stuff they ware at first and conventional stuff as worn later. And finally, the piping that can be seen on some of the shoulder straps is of different colours: some is white (far right) so infantry, some looks like pink (second right) so tankies and some darker (third right) that might be green and so panzergrenadiers

Post 7, first picture. The puttees indicate British infantry in an Indian division. As might the machetes?

Post 8, first and fourth pictures. Grants weren't used until May 1942 (Gazala) and Monty didn't arrive until the August. The sign for a spare parts store indicates sometime during the advance after Alamein and the shot of Monty was probably during the training for it, after Alam Halfa.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
I wonder whether the chap had been considering writing a book, a mix of personal and official photos .... ?
I doubt it, you could buy released prints from our Bn Int Cell after a tour. Some folk just collect stuff.
 
1569508620978.png


The PoW guard is a Frog. Some of his prisoners were evidently well-prepared - the one to his right rear is carrying more luggage than I take for a fortnight's holiday!

There was a small Frog force in the desert made up of a brigade of two legion battalions (who wore British battledress) and two brigades of Colonial units from as far away as the Pacific Islands. As the guard is wearing Frog uniform he's probably from one of those.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
1569508620978.png


The PoW guard is a Frog. Some of his prisoners were evidently well-prepared - the one to his right rear is carrying more luggage than I take for a fortnight's holiday!

There was a small Frog force in the desert made up of a brigade of two legion battalions (who wore British battledress) and two brigades of Colonial units from as far away as the Pacific Islands. As the guard is wearing Frog uniform he's probably from one of those.
13 DBLE didnt it go in the bag at Bir El Hackeim with 1DCLI?
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
I read an interesting book on water supply in the desert. It was amazing how well we did this (no puns intended) and laid miles of pipes to sustain millions of troops.
20190926_165348.jpg
 
13 DBLE didnt it go in the bag at Bir El Hackeim with 1DCLI?
No, they were still plodding on in Italy, the Champagne Campaign and Alsace.
 
Outstanding photos, some real peaches. IWM I am sure would go for them, but might be worth trying the National Army Museum. They are not ones I have seen before.
 
Some of those ones of Brit and knocked out Jerry armour, would be appreciated by any tank museum.
But, no that collection should be kept together. It'd be brilliant to get the collection made into a book, before donating to a museum. Once in the system it'll disappear.
Good example, 2RTR had its own museum that travelled with the Regt. Collated by a member of the Provost staff (The Sheriff RIP) over 22 years. When 1 and 2 RTR were amalgamated, the collection was donated to The Tank Museum. They cherry picked the best stuff, then auctioned the rest.
 
Outstanding photos, some real peaches. IWM I am sure would go for them, but might be worth trying the National Army Museum. They are not ones I have seen before.
...because donating them to a museum is guaranteed to prevent them seeing the light of day ever again.

Subject to copyright, their best fate (imho) would be to publish them, initially as an e-book to garner more information from readers about date, location and anecdotes then as a hard-back coffee table book.

Then donate the originals to a museum for safe-keeping.
 
Last edited:
1569508389888.png


A Skoda about to fail its MOT. A Marder III, a 7.5cm Pak 40 on a Pz38t chassis.

1569508436689.png


In 8th Army speak a Mk III Special (PzIIIJ to M with a 5cm L60 gun). Shades of the Italian Job...
 
No. Eight roadwheels. It's a Panzer IV, probably after an internal explosion that blew off the cupola and displaced the main gun, whose muzzle brake is also missing.
 
No. Eight roadwheels. It's a Panzer IV, probably after an internal explosion that blew off the cupola and displaced the main gun, whose muzzle brake is also missing.
Right you are! A MkIV Special (PzIVF2).
 
All of you talking about the vagaries of Museum collections have identified the major problem facing museums today. Storing stuff costs money and isn’t sexy so most are struggling to keep what they already have safe, let alone take in more. Making what they already have visible and available; even indexing, scanning and making photographs available on the web costs money they don’t have.
 
All of you talking about the vagaries of Museum collections have identified the major problem facing museums today. Storing stuff costs money and isn’t sexy so most are struggling to keep what they already have safe, let alone take in more. Making what they already have visible and available; even indexing, scanning and making photographs available on the web costs money they don’t have.
That's a fair point, which is why I mentioned private collections, the problem with which is making them available. There are many virtual museums, although as you point out that still costs money and effort. Quality also varies and does depend on resources.
 
That's a fair point, which is why I mentioned private collections, the problem with which is making them available. There are many virtual museums, although as you point out that still costs money and effort. Quality also varies and does depend on resources.
The problem with private collections is that understandably they often want to make their assets pay for themselves and so charge to view or download.
 

Latest Threads

Top