Officers vs Common Soldiers... what exactly IS the difference...

Given the camp had Avn, Log, Sig, RE, REME, RMP and various other "lodger" units, Station responsibilities sat with the Garrison HQ, and the CO looked a lot like Ronnie Corbitt. He was v keen that YO's played an active role in the life of the mess, which was code for "paid for the rump of mess activities they had no say in organising".

Then came a cohort that included our very own young and intrepid astronaught, "Ovlov the crab" who was so mental the RAF wanted nothing to do with him any more, and "Mick the Marine" amongst others who, whenever the keys for the Keller Bar got signed out, you knew it was going to get messy. In a matter of months the breakages bill went stratospheric which led to a very testy mess meeting in which views were "robustly aired and shared" about the way in which the spending of mess funds on social activities were skewed towards the interests of the "grown ups" with little on offer for the younger/jnr officers who made up about 60% of the membership given the number of units on camp which were seen as ideal first postings.
What can I say.

Mess rules (and the regulations which enshrine them) are based on the historical assumption that an officers mess will be a facility serving a small, tight-knit community whose members' interests (by which I mean, being decently fed, watered and accommodated) overlap - as they did in (say) the Napoleonic era.

It takes a complete failure of imagination to think that's the perfect template to overlay on the kind of mess you have described.

Such failures of imagination, sadly, are pretty much a given - it would seem - of our military culture.
 
I'm picturing you with a cloth cap, whippet, Northern accent and a shop steward's "in the workplace" manual clutched in your other hand.

Go on, I'm right aren't I? :p

Youre FTRS? One of those "career" soldiers who is to scared to let go?
 
Correct. But try telling that to Wolfie Smith above .... :rolleyes:

Look at you pretending that the juniors get a say where the PRI money gets spent. How cute.
 

Stibbon

Old-Salt
Youre FTRS? One of those "career" soldiers who is to scared to let go?

Ah!

Is that Trade Union speak for "doesn't look a gift horse in the mouth?". If so, then yes, absolutely. :)
 

Stibbon

Old-Salt
Look at you pretending that the juniors get a say where the PRI money gets spent. How cute.

You're an interesting character aren't you? (No really).

Tell me, are you still serving or did you get ejected or did you jump ship?
 
You're an interesting character aren't you? (No really).

Tell me, are you still serving or did you get ejected or did you jump ship?

I left after 24 years.

Tell us about these juniors who say what the PRI money gets spent on.
 

Stibbon

Old-Salt
I left after 24 years.

Tell us about these juniors who say what the PRI money gets spent on.

Well, it's not difficult to be honest.

Cpl Bloggins decides to organise a week away with the unit rugby team he helps coach and thinks to himself "I know, I'll fill out a PRI Funds request and ask for £300 from the PRI to help offset the cost of the end-of tour meal/piss up for all 20 of us. (The team is mainly junior ranks with a handful of seniors and a couple of officers).

He goes to his Sqn office/FSA gets the form, fills it out and sticks it in the OC PRI's pigeon hole in RHQ. Capt Spoonhead, the OC PRI asks the Regtl Accountant (SSgt) if the fund can afford it. "Of course it can Sir" is his written response. "Excellent" says Capt Spoonhead, I'll tell Cpl Bloggins to come and see you and collect the cash the day before they leave".

Well, there it is.

This of course, may or may not have happened in your fascist-led dictatorship of a unit mate, but it sure as hell happened in mine. It's only an example and is by no means an isolated one.

You must have been living in cave ....
 
Well, it's not difficult to be honest.

Cpl Bloggins decides to organise a week away with the unit rugby team he helps coach and thinks to himself "I know, I'll fill out a PRI Funds request and ask for £300 from the PRI to help offset the cost of the end-of tour meal/piss up for all 20 of us. (The team is mainly junior ranks with a handful of seniors and a couple of officers).

He goes to his Sqn office/FSA gets the form, fills it out and sticks it in the OC PRI's pigeon hole in RHQ. Capt Spoonhead, the OC PRI asks the Regtl Accountant (SSgt) if the fund can afford it. "Of course it can Sir" is his written response. "Excellent" says Capt Spoonhead, I'll tell Cpl Bloggins to come and see you and collect the cash the day before they leave".

Well, there it is.

This of course, may or may not have happened in your fascist-led dictatorship of a unit mate, but it sure as hell happened in mine. It's only an example and is by no means an isolated one.

You must have been living in cave ....

So to clarify, a cpl asks someone for something and the CO/OC is under no obligation to allow it.

That would probably explain why some regiments contributed to certain sports and not others.

Except in your area of course.
 

Stibbon

Old-Salt
So to clarify, a cpl asks someone for something and the CO/OC is under no obligation to allow it.

That would probably explain why some regiments contributed to certain sports and not others.

Except in your area of course.

Of course. It's called hierarchy. Did you not learn about that when you served?

So, just to clarify, you think that in a fund, funded mainly by Officers and Senior ranks, (outside of PRI shop sales) that it's the juniors who should preside over how the money gets spent?

To be honest, it's just dawned on me (it should have dawned on me a bit quicker to be honest :rolleyes:) but you don't really get any of this do you? My guess is that most of what I've posted tonight has gone straight over your head. That's fine.

You crack on ...
 
Sorry.
Every day's a school day eh?
No need to apologise.
I've been treating every day as a school day since I was 18, shit, nearly 60 years ago and I still don't know it all. Unlike some on here, I'm quite happy to admit to not knowing everything. That way, unlike those who do know everything, I'm still learning. Simples, a bit like me.
 

CrazyLegs!

War Hero
An officer will excuse himself to go to the toilet, a solider will excuse himself and tell you what he intends to do when he gets there.
 
The "Day's Pay" Scheme was - and probably still is - quite different. It relates to a contribution to the Regimental/Corps Association. There was an Army Form which you signed to authorise the deduction, and an amount equal to one quarter of a day's pay was charged to your pay account by the pay system once a quarter.
Normally this form was put in front of you in your first few days of service when you didn't know whether it was ********* or breakfast time.
The deduction was deemed legal because you had signed the form. The fact that was done by a mixture of subterfuge and duress was overlooked.

(Something is in my mind like Army Form A9038 . . . . something like that . . . . not that it matters.)
Not different at all in that it is another example where a lot of people talk brave but when they think it will be used against them pay up.
 

Fat POM

Old-Salt
This of course, may or may not have happened in your fascist-led dictatorship of a unit mate, but it sure as hell happened in mine. It's only an example and is by no means an isolated one.

You must have been living in cave ....
Good example. I spent much of my military career plundering thr PRI to help pay for expeditions, entry fees and sports equipment. It was my belief that in return for sending me to unpleasant places, the army, should help to fund overseas jollies disguised as valuable exercises in personal enhancement and team building. There was a lot of bureaucracy but well worth the effort.
 
Good example. I spent much of my military career plundering thr PRI to help pay for expeditions, entry fees and sports equipment. It was my belief that in return for sending me to unpleasant places, the army, should help to fund overseas jollies disguised as valuable exercises in personal enhancement and team building. There was a lot of bureaucracy but well worth the effort.
No one is disputing the value of PRI but the fact that people are still threatened if they don't pay into it (see FYB post). It's also worth noting that the only reason you get to plunder it was because others that paid into it didn't.
 

Fat POM

Old-Salt
No one is disputing the value of PRI but the fact that people are still threatened if they don't pay into it (see FYB post). It's also worth noting that the only reason you get to plunder it was because others that paid into it didn't.
Yet they had the same opportunity?
 
Top