Officers clicking heels

#61
Late to the party, but.

Heh. My interpretation of that clip at the time was that the HCR Major clicked heels as he'd like to spur things on, rather than as acceptance of Trump as CO - wouldn't read it that way.
Superficially regarded by those watching as a sign of formal respect for station, as Jorrocks noted.

Either that or he was nervous and on best behaviour, with HRH and the media breathing down his neck and embraced the suck, and fell into accord.

(If it was me, it'd be a disguised insult in that I'd be spurring his wife/daughter on later, if they needed it)

In answer to the question to WM1965's question:

As I understand it: It's both feet at once, from shoulder-width [edit: brought together at "Habacht Stellung (make ready)" then heels out and in to make the cilck on "Achtung (attention)" - it isn't considered a salute - it's an "at attention" with audible signal. Salute comes from at attention (ie, after the click to signify).
In a drill, it should be a single click, any click out of sync is beasted.
I'm unsure of its origins, but have had a conversation about it a few times in North and South German (my German is pretty rusty, but I think I got the gist) with some old guard and new, who have their own takes.
I listened more to the old guard.
It would make more sense, from a martial perspective, to click left into right, but I've never found out why it is both at once - put it down to tradition.

Back when protocol and sync. mattered more, fire by rank, advance, bayonet, charge, rinse and repeat etc... was more important than it is today.


Rest is junk unless you're interested in more than 240 char. tweets.

Trump's one of those handshakes where he exagerrates the Yank's "clasp and yank" shake. Pulls and pushes as aggro display of strength and dominant control. "Puppetting" the reciever or the purposeful, social tactic.
Counter is to not place left on wrist (stable dominance, ain't a good idea with head of state), but place left on shoulder (solidarity, respectful, supportive) for that handshake - physically defeats in acceptable manner.
It's not his natural handshake, like most folk - it's calculated and, now, predictable, losing its initial value in gaining in the upper hand through an acceptable, athough aggressive posture, start to the encounter.

Prussian Click is going to place the recipient in a weaker stance thats ripe for the puppetering handshake (CoB very close in front, unless at 45-90 degrees, in which more stable), so I'd warrant the major was more on politico protocol than on guard - but what need is there to be on guard, when you're on allied soil, attending HRH, as a showpiece. NMP.

Additional:
USAn's drill emphasises precision and "snap" - might be he was versed in this and so Prussian Heels would be recognised by Pres. as "extra respect" and to watching USAn Mil. or civ as "decent", in which case - homework, good form and show. It was interesting at Fort Bliss [US' 1-3 ABCT's, inc. their Cav. reg.] to note that some habits of the higher-ups that had rolled down. Heel clicks were (when I was there) usually done behind higher-up's back, sometimes with, "ja, herr kommondant" in response to some ropy thing. You gotta fight authority, but I'm unusure if it's wise to promote dissent through behind the back insults (even though I've been guilty of that also...). One fella there would piroutte as he stepped on ninth pace (half tab?) to tenth, so as - appeared to me - to defeat this behaviour. I later learned he had been promoted from ranks, not entered in. Makes sense.

Supplemental:
I've spent too long observing social nuances, for abnormal, and handshakes are a whole book - I've only ever seen one man defeat Trump's handshake in the mentioned "strucutural" way: Justin Trudeau (Canadian HoS).
Marcello Rebello de Sousa (Portuguese HoS) went the simple martial way of pulling the push - simply body mechanics, but demonstrates how much effort Trump puts into it - pulled Trump a step forward (counter-timed, same technique) and also brought a look a shock on Trump's fizzog that a small guy would be able to shift him, and his technique was met the same - only with
 
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#63
I haven't seen the video of the Officer under discussion but if it is who I think it is ..... he would be the first black Prussian Officer in history and such an accolade would rather appeal to him!
Yes, I can imagine he would.
 
#64
How strange! Were you with a squadron? In my 25 RAF years I can't recall anyone standing up except when the CO came into a room.
No, not a squadron, I was on the staff at the Central Flying School in Shawbury, teaching experienced pilots to be instructors. I never used to jump up when they came into the room, just nod and say hello - they probably thought that was normal for the Army.
 
#66
[snip...]I took over in Belize from another Household Cavalryman who had pissed off the Air Commander by insisting on addressing him as Wing Commander instead of Sir because that is the custom in our regiment. [/snip]
On that basis I have a question.

If a respected civvy (Mayor or other official on formal business) meets a senior officer of the Navy or Air Force who has one of these strange ranks (Captain, Commodore//Wing Commander, Air Commodore, Air Vice Marshall etc.), how would the civvy address them? Would they use the rank or is there some other convention?

I always fell a little awkward in these cases, whereas with the army it is simple.
 
#67
On that basis I have a question.

If a respected civvy (Mayor or other official on formal business) meets a senior officer of the Navy or Air Force who has one of these strange ranks (Captain, Commodore//Wing Commander, Air Commodore, Air Vice Marshall etc.), how would the civvy address them? Would they use the rank or is there some other convention?

I always fell a little awkward in these cases, whereas with the army it is simple.
If he was RAF he’d probably just call him Wayne
 

Daxx

MIA
Book Reviewer
#69
You tube the changing of the guard ceremony at the tomb of the unknown soldier. Mucho clicking of the heels by the Sentinels.
 
#70
On a related note, a friend of mine once saluted the then PM, Gordon Brown. There then ensued a mass argument as to if you should salute the Prime Minister of the day.

Much checking of QRs later and the only reference we could find was:

Compliments in Special Cases

J8.054.
a. An officer of Her Majesty's diplomatic or other non military service is entitled to the honours and salutes appertaining to his office.

b. An officer holding a civil office who is also an officer of flag, general or air rank is entitled to the honours due to that rank if they are higher than those due to his civil office.

c. The compliments laid down in these regulations are to be paid to officers of corresponding rank in the service of any power formally recognised by Her Majesty


Part me of thinks yes, it’s a polite greeting but the other half of me shudders at the possibility of having to salute Jeremy Corbyn!
 
#71
On a related note, a friend of mine once saluted the then PM, Gordon Brown. There then ensued a mass argument as to if you should salute the Prime Minister of the day.

Much checking of QRs later and the only reference we could find was:

Compliments in Special Cases

J8.054.
a. An officer of Her Majesty's diplomatic or other non military service is entitled to the honours and salutes appertaining to his office.


b. An officer holding a civil office who is also an officer of flag, general or air rank is entitled to the honours due to that rank if they are higher than those due to his civil office.

c. The compliments laid down in these regulations are to be paid to officers of corresponding rank in the service of any power formally recognised by Her Majesty

Part me of thinks yes, it’s a polite greeting but the other half of me shudders at the possibility of having to salute Jeremy Corbyn!
The only salute that IRA supporting Jew hater would get from me would be of the two fingered variety.
 
#74
If he gets into No10 that's all you'll get and be thankful for it.
Only if you hit your tractor production targets. Otherwise it's cabbage soup (with a turnip added on Sundays if you're good) for you, my lad!
 
#75
Spent a bit of time attached to the KRH in Bosnia,they always called their CO Colonel. Being a grunt,I called him Sir. No one seemed to mind. I was told it was carry over from the 14/20th.
Bloody nice chaps, mind!
 
#78
New spuds are old now and I find them tasteless this time of year. Some of the ones I had this have been very poor this year. No union rings?
Like this one? ;)
240_F_79222566_mqLdoIqr8oJLSWRIevSCa96llEl0uafW.jpg
 
#79
On a related note, a friend of mine once saluted the then PM, Gordon Brown. There then ensued a mass argument as to if you should salute the Prime Minister of the day.

Much checking of QRs later and the only reference we could find was:

Compliments in Special Cases

J8.054.
a. An officer of Her Majesty's diplomatic or other non military service is entitled to the honours and salutes appertaining to his office.

b. An officer holding a civil office who is also an officer of flag, general or air rank is entitled to the honours due to that rank if they are higher than those due to his civil office.

c. The compliments laid down in these regulations are to be paid to officers of corresponding rank in the service of any power formally recognised by Her Majesty


Part me of thinks yes, it’s a polite greeting but the other half of me shudders at the possibility of having to salute Jeremy Corbyn!
I have just the salute.

He can choose between the English or American versions.
 

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