Officer with Asperger's syndrome?

Yup main problem is inconsistent parenting. Parents don't back each other up and talk things through when the kids aren't around.
Any weakness will be exploited and bedrooms are for sleeping in not for TV, computers etc.
Poor sleep, poor diet, can't study in school. Parents take them to a GP who refers to a psychiatrist.

i'd amplify that a bit, its not so much porr diet and giving in as it is from an early age abusing the poor buggers wiht no instructions as to the differnce between right and wrong or accetable behavious coupled wiht the strange obsession of shoving high e number containing sweets and cola down there throats then after a few years when they go to school and chuck a whirlwind hissey fit thats not exactly normal for his age group getting him assigned a lable and receving the incumbant cash support it entails, 1 x adhd brat = 500 smackers a week, free sky subscription, free games console. theres other benefits as well but thats just for starters, oh and you get assigned a social worker who can give you special holidays with lots for little johnny to see and do that combine with mum n dad getting a lazzy week poolside with the all inclusive bar.

every time a checkup is due and once or twice a week for good measure you overdose the poor defenceless idiot with e numbers to ensure the gravey train keeps flowing.

if i was in charge of the policy department my first reaction to an adhd notification would be removing the child from home and seeing if with proper controled dietary intake there condition evaporated, if it did charge the parets with child abuse and put the rescuded lil blighter into care where he might be recoverable.

if it didnt investigate a bit more and return him to his parents, clearly some kids are just wired up a bit differently.

as far as it goes as a child i was considered "special" i was fixated on guns bombs blood and guns, added ot which i was somewhat antisocial towards others of my own age but considered polite and well mannerd to adults, my only real problem is dyslexia and i joined a job which let me play wiht my earliest childhood fixations,

people are far to concerend wiht finding out why there kid is not the same as the rest instead of worrying about instilling a healthy fear of wrongdoing and ensuring a good intake of nutrients undoctored by dodgy chemicals.

if people were more intersted in the real jobs of being a parent then perhaps the shrinks could get on with looking after all the loonies insted of having scaring the comunity programs, sorry i mean uncared for in the comunity programs.

lock the dodgy ones up stick the rest in assisted living and make sure they get the necessary help.

whilst i understand kids with autsitic spectrum disorders (real ones not chemically induced ones) can be dificult ot look after, its not that hard ot find something they like and then use the carrot and stick method to teach them enough ot get by in wider society, if there not teachable then sad as it is perhaps they need to be in professional surroundings.
 
First of all, I would like to say a very big thank you to everyone who has replied to my original post: I think its says a lot both for the Army and for ARRSE that so many people have taken the time to help just one worried 16-year old.

I completely accept, as does my son, that the Army is not Marks & Spencer's, and that if he can't be effective on the battlefield then he shouldn't be allowed to join in any capacity, leave alone in a leadership position.

He was originally diagnosed at age six, and for sure he was a very difficult child, but he is now transformed and it's quite difficult to distinguish what might be considered Asperger's traits from the normal behaviour of a stroppy male teenager.

Two things seem apparent from analysing all your posts:

a) he might quite possibly be rejected for putting down Asperger's on his application form, without even getting to a Medical;

b) the original diagnosis may have been incorrect.

It also seems that there may be quite a lot of people in the Army who are somewhere on the autistic spectrum, and who are performing quite effectively in various roles.

To digress slightly (a good ARRSE tradition!) , if anyone were to read an introductory text on Asperger's, and then to read a biography of Field Marshal Montgomery, they might conclude that a mild form of the condition is no barrier to high command!

One of the problems with Asperger's is that, as far as I know there is no definitive physical diagnostic test. Another is that it is a complex and poorly-understood condition, and it may not be a single condition at all. As my son's original diagnosis is now over ten years old, and things have moved on in the interim, I think it would be reasonable to get another opinion, and depending on the outcome then he can continue to pursue his ambitions or look for another direction.

If the original diagnosis is found to be incorrect, he hopefully can continue with the ACF, go to Uni and do UOTC, and carry on with Outward Bound courses, voluntary work etc to build his self-confidence and leadership qualities If he can pass the Medical maybe he could do a year with the TA and a deployment before applying for RMAS. That should give him his best shot at officer selection, and if he fails AOSB at least he will know that he's been considered. He will also have had a good time, and he will emerge as a more mature, capable and rounded individual.

I would add that we have discussed this extensively, and it's not just me telling him what to do........


Once again, very many thanks for all your help,


Solent 5



For anyone reading this thread who may have a child, relative or friend with Asperger's, the common orthodoxy that Asperger's is untreatable may not be correct: there are now programmes which claim to at least ameliorate the effects of the condition, and if we were starting over I would certainly investigate them. This is due to the concept of "neuroplasticity", which proposes that the brain can build alternative neural pathways if the original ones are damaged or lackingin some way, but this is a theory and i am certainly n ot an expert.


The following stories may give you a better idea of what my son is like: you may also find them amusing.......

on cadet camp, after two nights in a basha in the pouring rain, stag, and being woken up wet-through at 3.00am to repel a company attack(not popular!), his group were tasked to do a 3.5km run in full kit and then climb a hill; the run was OK, but at the end one cadet was on his knees vomiting and another threw a strop and refused to climb the hill; an instructor told my son to "make" the stroppy one go up the hill: this was a problem, because neither his education nor experience have equipped him to compel chavvy inner-city kids to do what they really don't want to; however, observing that the kid was as hard as nails but really very small, he relieved him of his rifle, threw him over his shoulder and carried him kicking and screaming up the hill....

school hockey was always going to be difficult for him, because of poor co-ordination, so after a few weeks I asked him how it was going: "Oh, I really like it"...cue surprised parent... "Well, I know I can't dribble the ball, so I'm a defender. I run at the opposition screaming maniacally and waving my stick over my head, then I crash into the tackle with 150% commitment and I don't take no for an answer. If that doesn't work, I wait til the ref's not looking and hook the other guy's legs from under him, then give the ball to someone else!" ....don't you find you get hurt rather a lot?..... "Not nearly as much as you might think, and best of all EVERYONE ALWAYS WANTS ME TO BE ON THEIR TEAM!"

My 13 year old has just been dumped by Cadets because he has Aspergers despite his CO saying he's one of the best there.
Cadets/Army is perfect environment for Aspies, Discipline and order, their logical minds love it.
Didn't know kids could be excluded from cadets because of this, advise anyone.
He has fitted in well and was 'student of the year' in his Karate club.
I'm gutted, have no idea how my kid feels as he cannot express himself well emotionally and this is one problem he has worked so hard to deal with.
 
My 13 year old has just been dumped by Cadets because he has Aspergers despite his CO saying he's one of the best there.
Cadets/Army is perfect environment for Aspies, Discipline and order, their logical minds love it.
Didn't know kids could be excluded from cadets because of this, advise anyone.
He has fitted in well and was 'student of the year' in his Karate club.
I'm gutted, have no idea how my kid feels as he cannot express himself well emotionally and this is one problem he has worked so hard to deal with.

I think you should try to find out why. I am not familar with the rules, but have always understood that (within reason) the Cadets will take anyone who is not a danger to himself or others, is not disruptive etc.

If the Karate Club can handle him, I would expect the cadets to manage it, unless there are some real issues. At least ask the question.
 
I think you should try to find out why. I am not familar with the rules, but have always understood that (within reason) the Cadets will take anyone who is not a danger to himself or others, is not disruptive etc.

If the Karate Club can handle him, I would expect the cadets to manage it, unless there are some real issues. At least ask the question.

Just seen the cadets CO. He says that the higher ups have decided that my son 'might' need 1-1 care when on camp and they can't provide it so he can't be a cadet????.
He doesn't need 1-1 anything really except in his Russian lessons and I pay for them.
The CO is going to have another word with the 'bigger wigs' and the Padre at the weekend because the Maj who pased on the decision has refused to speak to me (says the CO). The cadets CO is great and very supportive, but as he says he follows orders and doesn't make the rules.
We'll see what happens on Sat. I'm not just going to take this sitting down, there are posts bu the hundred on the net all about Aspies in the army cadets.
Thanks for your reply.
 

Fang_Farrier

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My 13 year old has just been dumped by Cadets because he has Aspergers despite his CO saying he's one of the best there.
Cadets/Army is perfect environment for Aspies, Discipline and order, their logical minds love it.
Didn't know kids could be excluded from cadets because of this, advise anyone.
He has fitted in well and was 'student of the year' in his Karate club.
I'm gutted, have no idea how my kid feels as he cannot express himself well emotionally and this is one problem he has worked so hard to deal with.

Aspies tend to do well at sports such as Karate and rugby where discipline, Rules and Laws are strictly enforced and adhered to.
 
I have a nephew 21 years old with Aspergers or however the hell you spell it.

He is 6'1", built like a brick shithouse, would pass P Company and do it again the same day. Believe me.

He is also well turned out, able to be very well spoken and pulls really cracking birds.
Good on him.

What he cannot do is take in the training which enables you to be shouted at,insulted, spat at, petrol bombed etc. etc. without losing control and killing someone at an inappropriate time.

There are other areas they can succeed in - just not the military.

Good luck.
 
Could you tell me the source of this? My brother is not being offered an assessment

You tell em. The cleverest man in the universe had aspergers and he had it before it was even invented, same as Tropper.
 

Fang_Farrier

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You tell em. The cleverest man in the universe had aspergers and he had it before it was even invented, same as Tropper.

i_had_aspergers_before_it_was_cool_t_shirts-rc6f9edbb53c345f2b7f55d5f44de0825_jy59n_512.jpg
 

So did Isaac Newton. Quite a character. He also never had any mates, did alchemy and sat up doing sums for so long that he drove himself mad - started writing bizarre and insulting letters to people - more than once.

That's great if you're the up and coming master of the universe, but not really what you'd hope for in your platoon commander.
 

Fang_Farrier

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So did Isaac Newton. Quite a character. He also never had any mates, did alchemy and sat up doing sums for so long that he drove himself mad - started writing bizarre and insulting letters to people - more than once.

That's great if you're the up and coming master of the universe, but not really what you'd hope for in your platoon commander.

Never did Monty any harm!
 
Look, no expertise in this at all, just direct experience of Asberger's through my brother, but 'socially well-adjusted, has a wide circle of friends, is analytically intelligent, and is more than happy to engage in group discussions and presentations etc.'? Are you sure he may not have been misdiagnosed? My brother is classic Asberger's in virtually every conceivable way, but I've started to think that it is being massively over-diagnosed
I would be very grateful if anyone could help me with this issue.

My son, who is 16, suffers from Asperger's syndrome, an autistic spectrum disorder, but he is very keen to join the army as an infantry officer when he finishes Uni.

He has now been told by our local careers office that he cannot join with Asperger's, but since their advice generally has been less than clear, and in some respects is at odds with the information on the Army website, it would be very helpful if someone could confirm whether this is correct.

He is not a typical Asperger's personality, ie socially withdrawn, obsessive and intellectually rigid, but is socially well-adjusted, has a wide circle of friends, is analytically intelligent, and is more than happy to engage in group discussions and presentations etc. He is very bright and I am sure that he is intellectually capable of being an officer.

He has worked very hard to overcome his Asperger's, and he is working on his physical co-ordination, which is his primary remaining issue.

He is in the ACF, and loves exercises, camps and all the military stuff. His unit CO knows he has Asperger's, but if anyone else does I think they have forgotten, and he is treated just like any other member of his Company.

He understands that he might not be good enough to pass AOSB, and he accepts that, but if he is rejected purely on the account of a condition which he has largely overcome, through a huge amount of effort on his part, he will be absolutely devastated.

Any information would be much appreciated.

I have worked with many people younger than your son who have been diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome and other autism Spectrum Disorders, and with 2 older men. I have yet to meet a single one who resembles the description you offer of your son, or who even comes close.

As has been said already, have you ever questioned the diagnosis? People in all professions make errors. There is no blood test for the conditions you describe. Behaviours are rated against a checklist, ie the Connor's Rating Scale. Your description of your son is almost the opposite of many of the behaviours that would lead toward that diagnosis.
 
So did Isaac Newton. Quite a character. He also never had any mates, did alchemy and sat up doing sums for so long that he drove himself mad - started writing bizarre and insulting letters to people - more than once.

That's great if you're the up and coming master of the universe, but not really what you'd hope for in your platoon commander.
Most Arrsers have some of those traits , especially the insulting people bit .
 
I have a nephew 21 years old with Aspergers or however the hell you spell it.

He is 6'1", built like a brick shithouse, would pass P Company and do it again the same day. Believe me.

He is also well turned out, able to be very well spoken and pulls really cracking birds.
Good on him.

What he cannot do is take in the training which enables you to be shouted at,insulted, spat at, petrol bombed etc. etc. without losing control and killing someone at an inappropriate time.

There are other areas they can succeed in - just not the military.

Good luck.

I just found this thread browsing the net and made an account to reply, this pretty much hits the nail on the head in my situation. I'm a "sperg" and have learnt to deal with people socially etc, all that is fine now. I'm also very pragmatic and wouldn't have any issues with following orders due to morals etc. But I probably would do a Private Pyle if I was properly victimised, hence why I decided not to bother pursuing a career as a military engineer when I found aspergers was a major barrier. I'm sure people with aspergers could be of some use to certain sections of the army, but they are unconventional and to a degree unpredictable. I agree with a previous post he would do much better pursuing a career with somewhere like GCHQ.
 

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