Officer Reserve Recruitment for Peacekeeping Missions - which unit?

Good afternoon all.

New to this. Civilian with several degrees and considerable non-military experience. One of my long-term interests is in serving on peacekeeping missions and emergency response. I have ready everything I can find online. To make most of unit-level recruitment conversations I want to ensure I first understand my options, and would appreciate contributions on any of the following:

1. Which, if any, reserve units would maximise opportunities to deploy on emergency response/international peacekeeping missions (Monusco, Mali etc)?

2. I understand the RLC undertakes some work on facilitating peacekeeping/building missions and crisis response (Eg with Ebola), albeit not serving as an actual peacekeeper on patrol. Would joining as a reservist officer provide opportunities for deploying to such missions?

3. I speak other languages. Are there greater opportunities for multilingual officers to deploy to operations in regions speaking that language - and if so, would I be wise to apply to specific units that tend to send such officers?

With thanks in advance for taking the time to respond, and apologies if any of the above has been covered already.
 
Last edited:
In all honesty you'd be better off joining DfID
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
Good afternoon all.

New to this. Civilian with several degrees and considerable non-military experience. One of my long-term interests is in serving on peacekeeping missions. I have ready everything I can find online. To make most of unit-level recruitment conversations I want to ensure I first understand my options, and would appreciate contributions on any of the following:

1. Which, if any, reserve units would maximise opportunities to deploy on international peacekeeping missions (Monusco, Mali etc)?

2. I understand the RLC undertakes some work on facilitating peacekeeping/building missions, albeit not serving as an actual peacekeeper on patrol. Would joining as a reservist officer provide opportunities for deploying to such missions?

3. I speak other languages. Are there greater opportunities for multilingual officers to deploy to operations in regions speaking that language - and if so, would I be wise to apply to specific units that tend to send such officers?

With thanks in advance for taking the time to respond, and apologies if any of the above has been covered already.
Officer-wise, any of the specialist units if they still exist, largely because they have skills that the Regs don't have, at least to the same degree. Medics, Info Ops, Media Ops and Civil Affairs used to rate lots of playtime - I suspect that's also true of Int types, particularly with languages.
 

Dr Death

Old-Salt
RAMC as a Medical Support Officer.
BUT if you really want to do good in devastated areas of the world then the UNCHR & Medical Dept
 
RAMC as a Medical Support Officer.
BUT if you really want to do good in devastated areas of the world then the UNCHR & Medical Dept
If you really want to do good import their products / produce
 

Dr Death

Old-Salt
If you really want to do good import their products / produce
Easier said than done.
Aid is often siphoned off by a corrupt government, so feet on ground better to give directly where aid is needed.
 
Sorry to burst your ballon here mate, but I worked for years in the aid and development field and found it to be a soul destroying waste of my time.

I was in Indonesia when the 2004 Tsunami hit. The behaviour of NGOs and government bodies was disgusting to say the least.

Day one the Jakarta hotels booked out with emergency response “tourists” and the bars and bar girls did a roaring time. That first day one stupid NGO hired the only heavy lift helicopter in the area, and used it to make a donations promotional video clip at Banda Aceh. That afternoon the locals tried to hire it to move life saving medicines and it had gone.

Less than 10% of those NGO tourists ever left the cities to actually see what was going on. I saw them every night in seedy bars with a hooker on their arm. Hundreds, HUNDREDS, of them.

It was an NGO bonanza.

And those NGOs? Almost all were completely useless. Toys for children. Books for people who cannot read. shit like that.

Then there were the agenda driven NGOs - providing feminine rights advice etc.

At one stage NGOs stood in what remained of ruined villages fighting over the placement of signs.

It was a disgusting and embarrassing spectacle.

It has got no better. Now every project or activity has to be accompanied by a “gender advisor”....
 
Good afternoon all.

New to this. Civilian with several degrees and considerable non-military experience. One of my long-term interests is in serving on peacekeeping missions and emergency response. I have ready everything I can find online. To make most of unit-level recruitment conversations I want to ensure I first understand my options, and would appreciate contributions on any of the following:

1. Which, if any, reserve units would maximise opportunities to deploy on emergency response/international peacekeeping missions (Monusco, Mali etc)?

2. I understand the RLC undertakes some work on facilitating peacekeeping/building missions and crisis response (Eg with Ebola), albeit not serving as an actual peacekeeper on patrol. Would joining as a reservist officer provide opportunities for deploying to such missions?

3. I speak other languages. Are there greater opportunities for multilingual officers to deploy to operations in regions speaking that language - and if so, would I be wise to apply to specific units that tend to send such officers?

With thanks in advance for taking the time to respond, and apologies if any of the above has been covered already.
You don't day what degrees you have.

I would suggest 170 works group if you're civil engineering.

RLC and medics are ok, but again specialist skills may make you more employable.

Int corps is a good option.

Once in under any capbadge) you could volunteer for anything that came your way, or ask to move to 77x for the info ops piece and continue volunteering.

You might not get to go on a humanitarian relief effort but I can assure you of useful, and stimulating work in both 170 and the int corps reserve.
 
Sorry to burst your ballon here mate, but I worked for years in the aid and development field and found it to be a soul destroying waste of my time.

I was in Indonesia when the 2004 Tsunami hit. The behaviour of NGOs and government bodies was disgusting to say the least.

Day one the Jakarta hotels booked out with emergency response “tourists” and the bars and bar girls did a roaring time. That first day one stupid NGO hired the only heavy lift helicopter in the area, and used it to make a donations promotional video clip at Banda Aceh. That afternoon the locals tried to hire it to move life saving medicines and it had gone.

Less than 10% of those NGO tourists ever left the cities to actually see what was going on. I saw them every night in seedy bars with a hooker on their arm. Hundreds, HUNDREDS, of them.

It was an NGO bonanza.

And those NGOs? Almost all were completely useless. Toys for children. Books for people who cannot read. shit like that.

Then there were the agenda driven NGOs - providing feminine rights advice etc.

At one stage NGOs stood in what remained of ruined villages fighting over the placement of signs.

It was a disgusting and embarrassing spectacle.

It has got no better. Now every project or activity has to be accompanied by a “gender advisor”....
I suppose when you have a ring fenced inflation proof aid budget, the money has to be spent somehow before the end of the financial year.
 
Good afternoon all.

New to this. Civilian with several degrees and considerable non-military experience. One of my long-term interests is in serving on peacekeeping missions and emergency response. I have ready everything I can find online. To make most of unit-level recruitment conversations I want to ensure I first understand my options, and would appreciate contributions on any of the following:

1. Which, if any, reserve units would maximise opportunities to deploy on emergency response/international peacekeeping missions (Monusco, Mali etc)?

2. I understand the RLC undertakes some work on facilitating peacekeeping/building missions and crisis response (Eg with Ebola), albeit not serving as an actual peacekeeper on patrol. Would joining as a reservist officer provide opportunities for deploying to such missions?

3. I speak other languages. Are there greater opportunities for multilingual officers to deploy to operations in regions speaking that language - and if so, would I be wise to apply to specific units that tend to send such officers?

With thanks in advance for taking the time to respond, and apologies if any of the above has been covered already.
Have you thought about the Defence Cultural Specialist Unit? Its a national unit so shouldn't be location dependent.

Others may know but are they what used to be called something else and based in Surrey? I forget the name but they were some sort of intelligence / cultural / linguistics / civil affairs unit and always sounded very interesting albeit fairly below the radar.
 
Officer-wise, any of the specialist units if they still exist, largely because they have skills that the Regs don't have, at least to the same degree. Medics, Info Ops, Media Ops and Civil Affairs used to rate lots of playtime - I suspect that's also true of Int types, particularly with languages.
Good insight, cheers. I may well end up applying to one of the specialist units, but I have one query. I'm interested in a lot of the things the army does and one of the things that attracts me to the army is the breadth of opportunities for contributing in areas I'm not presently specialised in. Is it fair to assume that joining a specialist unit upon commissioning would tend to restrict my participation to training opportunities relevant to that particular unit, or is that not the case?
 
Good insight, cheers. I may well end up applying to one of the specialist units, but I have one query. I'm interested in a lot of the things the army does and one of the things that attracts me to the army is the breadth of opportunities for contributing in areas I'm not presently specialised in. Is it fair to assume that joining a specialist unit upon commissioning would tend to restrict my participation to training opportunities relevant to that particular unit, or is that not the case?
The army is a broad church and there are opportunities to do all sorts of things if you keep your eyes open, and one of the more specialist units is probably a good place to find them. However, I would worry more about getting in and getting trained first.
 
Have you thought about the Defence Cultural Specialist Unit? Its a national unit so shouldn't be location dependent.

Others may know but are they what used to be called something else and based in Surrey? I forget the name but they were some sort of intelligence / cultural / linguistics / civil affairs unit and always sounded very interesting albeit fairly below the radar.
Sounds like 77 Brigade based at Hermitage in Berkshire. They include things like psyops, cultural property protection and other ‘niche‘ stuff.
 
Good insight, cheers. I may well end up applying to one of the specialist units, but I have one query. I'm interested in a lot of the things the army does and one of the things that attracts me to the army is the breadth of opportunities for contributing in areas I'm not presently specialised in. Is it fair to assume that joining a specialist unit upon commissioning would tend to restrict my participation to training opportunities relevant to that particular unit, or is that not the case?
Go local first. You can transfer when in.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
Good insight, cheers. I may well end up applying to one of the specialist units, but I have one query. I'm interested in a lot of the things the army does and one of the things that attracts me to the army is the breadth of opportunities for contributing in areas I'm not presently specialised in. Is it fair to assume that joining a specialist unit upon commissioning would tend to restrict my participation to training opportunities relevant to that particular unit, or is that not the case?
The first thing to do is to become a trained soldier and then get commissioned. While you're doing that you'll get a better idea of what's out there and what appeals.
 
The first thing to do is to become a trained soldier and then get commissioned. While you're doing that you'll get a better idea of what's out there and what appeals.
Ok, thanks for this. I had thought I would need to arrive at a final choice much earlier in the process.
 
Ok, thanks for this. I had thought I would need to arrive at a final choice much earlier in the process.
You have to pick a unit to join but you aren't locked into it.

In fact I'd say you have more mobility as a reserve than a regular.

As long as you aren't an admin case and they have a vacancy for you at your destination unit.
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
A big factor in your choice of unit, should be geographical location.

It’s all well and good joining the 5th Glasgow Disaster Relief Regiment, but f you live in London it’s all largely pointless.

Best to speak to your local unit and see what sort of stuff they get up to.

I would suggest that the bigger and more diverse the unit, the more opportunities there will be to deploy with different units, in different roles.

Of course if you’re in London then there can be only one.

HAC all the way.

The HAC is a big unit (in Army Reserve terms) with a lot of fingers in different pies. When I was there HAC soldiers deployed with the Guards, 4/73 battery RA, RLC, REME, 29 Commando, 7 Para RHA, PWRR, RAMC plus a few others.

Not many other Army Reserve units have the contacts and clout to get soldiers into such a wide and varied range of units. It’s about casting your net wide and far. If someone is out there doing peacekeeping stuff, then they’re more likely to accept an AR soldier from a unit they know and have contacts with (never underestimate the power of inviting people to the best ball in town) than from a completely unrelated cap badge.
 

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