Officer commission without A Levels or UCAS points (Soldier entry to Sandhurst)

Instead, should I just do Sixth Form and attempt to become an Officer?

  • Yes

    Votes: 10 62.5%
  • No

    Votes: 2 12.5%
  • Consider more options

    Votes: 4 25.0%

  • Total voters
    16
#21
Up to you, mucker. Just bear in mind that you won't be put in said position at 18 (realistically closer to 19 or 20) unless many, many very well qualified people (selection boards / officer trg / Phase 2 trg staff) think you're up to it, and whilst you are in said junior leadership post in your late teens / early 20s you will be EXTREMELY closely mentored by elder / better / more experienced people than you, namely WOs, Coy / Sqn Cdrs and COs. It's the way the system has been for generations, it's probably right.

Ultimately though, if your outlook is that "people-shouldn't-be-officers-at-18-because-soldiers-are-older-than-them", then don't look to join as an officer at that age. You've got to be true to yourself.
Very true, I always guessed young Officers would receive at least some advice from men and women more experienced than them. It still is a huge responsibility to undertake and the Army promotes individualism as well as responsibility. It's a question of "Who can lead better? A young Officer fresh out of training or a Warrant Officer with a spotless record, decades of service and clear ability to succeed?" That's how I see it anyways.
 
#22
As someone who joined as an officer aged 18 and has survived a further 17 years without being sacked (yet) my view is you are overthinking this. My take is:

The forces are geared towards growing young officers. That system is founded on mutual respect - your sncos will generally seek to look after and mentor you and understand that relationship. They will not usually stand by and watch you fail for the sake of it. They will protect you if needs be (assuming you aren’t a complete tool of course)

Your young soldiers won’t put the same amount of thought in you are. You will simply be another new officer to them. There will be lots of other young officers knocking around and don’t forget - even a 21 year old graduate is still young and will worry about commanding respect.

You will have a training system and a peer group that will support you as you gain experience.

And don’t forget that to become an officer straight from civvy street has less barriers than once you are in as a soldier.

My advice for what it’s worth is get some decent a levels. Then if you still want to join up either go to a (decent) uni or attempt officer when you are 18 and do a degree inside the military.

You may reason that a few years as a soldier will ‘earn’ you that elusive thing called respect. I would disagree and argue that all you will do is lose the pay and seniority you could have earned by commissioning from day 1. You will make mistakes along the way (we all do) but do not self select yourself out before the army has had a chance to do it for you!

Lastly don’t forget the navy... :). We aren’t just about bum and baccy (though clearly there is a bit of that).
 
#23
Very true, I always guessed young Officers would receive at least some advice from men and women more experienced than them. It still is a huge responsibility to undertake and the Army promotes individualism as well as responsibility. It's a question of "Who can lead better? A young Officer fresh out of training or a Warrant Officer with a spotless record, decades of service and clear ability to succeed?" That's how I see it anyways.
As a young officer you will be reliant on other more senior officers, your troop staffy and some of your more experienced Sgts/Cpls.

You won’t be making decisions on your own for a while after you commission. At least none that will break anything or ruin anyone’s career.

You might be allowed to choose the biscuits for tea & toast in the mess occasionally.
 
#24
Christ, I suppose being an Officer isn’t as responsible as I thought. Any know how to cancel an Army application? If the training can make me capable and independent enough not to shit my kegs when the recruits ask “So what now?” then I’ll go for it.
 
#27
It’s very responsible, just not til you find your feet and have a bit of experience.

It’s also a great life/job.
I was exaggerating. Just since I’ll receive support from my peers and senior Officers, I could definetly attempt to become an Officer. I originally wanted to when considering the Army (at about 13/14) but the A Levels requirement and, of course, immediate responsibilities kind of threw me off.
 
#29
If I had the grades to of done A Levels then I would’ve done them lad and joined adult entry rather than junior entry
 
#30
But do what you think is right for you and what you would enjoy the most
 
#31
Also..
If you’re worried about the responsibility remember that they train you at sandhurst how to deal with that. I didn’t join the army knowing how to strip a sa80 or know 6 section battle orders it comes as you learn kiddo
 
#32
Well, looking at the requirements for commissioning, everyone except an LE (that's an old and bold guy who's gone right through to (normally) Warrant Officer and then being offered a commission) will require 35 ALIS points
In addition a score of 180 UCAS Tariff points acquired in separate subjects at AS and A level, or equivalent. These must include a minimum of two passes at A level, or equivalent, at grades A-E. Note that the General Studies paper does not qualify for UCAS Tariff points.

The attainment of a degree will normally override the requirement for UCAS Tariff points.
Not quite.

Albertous Junior went to Harrogate now in 6 year of adult service in 29 Commando and he has passed his briefing board at Westbury and (like most serving soldiers going pips up) starts his Potential Officer Development Course at Worthy Down in April. He has got limited GCSE and certainly no A or A/S levels.
 
#33
Not quite.

Albertous Junior went to Harrogate now in 6 year of adult service in 29 Commando and he has passed his briefing board at Westbury and (like most serving soldiers going pips up) starts his Potential Officer Development Course at Worthy Down in April. He has got limited GCSE and certainly no A or A/S levels.
You are quite correct. Just 5 GCSEs or an assessment at ASE for serving soldiers. The PODC at ASE is designed to give him an equal chance as a civilian coming to Main Board. He will have spent his soldier career thus far 'doing', mostly directed by others. His civilian counterparts will have been honing their intellect in various ways, but mostly in tertiary education, allowing them to think freely and express themselves and their ideas. AOSB Main Board is a test of ability to think, analyse, come up with a solution and then direct. That tends to get hidden away - or beaten out of you - as a young Tom. ASE is designed to make it reemerge.

(Edited for spelling)

Halloumikid
 
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